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News: Almost one in three mothers suffers mental health problems

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  • Robert Karl Stonjek
    Almost one in three mothers suffers mental health problems April 29, 2010 by Jennifer Trueland Almost a third of mothers suffer poor mental health at some
    Message 1 of 6 , Apr 29, 2010

      Almost one in three mothers suffers mental health problems

      April 29, 2010  by Jennifer Trueland

      Almost a third of mothers suffer poor mental health at some point in the first four or five years of their child’s life, according to a study which aims to show what it is like being a child in Scotland today.

      Growing Up in Scotland (GUS) – which tracks the experiences of 8,000 families – also shows that around three in ten young Scottish children are classified in living in poverty and that health inequalities are seen from the earliest point in life.

      Remarkably, given the gloomy picture in the reports, most children (over 80 per cent) do not display any difficulties with their social, emotional and behavioural difficulties when they start primary school.

      But it says that children who do not experience “smacking and shouting” and who have more social interaction with their parents and others, are less at risk of having problems with conduct and hyperactivity.

      The fourth set of findings of the study, which began in 2005, looks at issues faced by children in the first five years of their lives, including poverty, child health, behavioural development and maternal mental health.

      Maternal mental health is one of the specific areas investigated because it is believed to have a significant impact on a child’s early development.

      The report shows that almost a third of all the mothers interviewed experienced poor mental health at some point in the four years after the survey baby’s birth – at any one point, up to 16 per cent of mothers was experiencing mental health difficulties.

      Mental health was associated with a mother’s social circumstances, with those who experienced poverty, and those living in more deprived areas, more likely to experience brief and repeated mental health problems.

      Importantly, the study found that children whose mothers were emotionally well throughout the survey period had better social, behavioural and emotional development than those whose mothers had brief mental health problems, and they in turn had better development than those whose mothers had repeated mental health problems. This was the case even when socio-economic factors were taken into account.

      “By age four, children who experienced prolonged (repeated) exposure to a mother with mental health problems were particularly likely to have poor behavioural, emotional and social outcomes. At the point when they are about to start formal education, these early deficits may affect their transition to school and their subsequent development and attainment,” the report says.

      Although they cannot say how or why maternal mental health had an impact on children’s outcomes, the authors “postulate that deficits in attachment may play a role by disrupting the mother-child relationship, inhibiting the nature and quality of their interactions”.

      They call for better support for mothers with mental health problems, saying it may have a direct impact on young children’s development and well-being – and could improve their early experiences of school.

      A separate report (also part of the GUS study) on children’s social, emotional and behavioural characteristics when starting primary school, shows that while the vast majority report no problems, around 20 per cent do. This was highest for problems related to conduct, where 27 per cent did not score in the accepted “normal” range.

      While conduct problems were most prevalent, emotional problems were the least so, the report says.

      Children who suffered poorer health between the ages of two and five were consistently more likely to have greater behavioural difficulties when they started school than those with better health.

      Children who experienced no shouting or smacking, higher levels of social interaction with their parents, and a higher frequency of social visits were less likely to have problems with conduct and hyperactivity, the report says.

      The Scottish government said that action was being taken across departments and agencies to improve children’s lives in the early years. Shona Robison, the public health minister said: “No-one should be condemned to a life of ill health because of where they live or their family’s background. Poor health is not inevitable and we should not accept it.”

      She said health in Scotland is improving but not quickly enough, but that strategies such as Equally Well, the Report of the Ministerial Task Force on Health Inequalities, had shifted the emphasis from dealing with the consequences of health inequalities to tackling the underlying causes such as poverty, employment, support for families and improving physical and social environments.

      “Supporting women to have as healthy a pregnancy as possible is vitally important. That is why the Maternity Services Action Group is refreshing the framework for maternity services in reducing health inequalities and improving health – particularly amongst women with the greatest needs,” she added.

      Source: Caledonian Mercury
      http://health.caledonianmercury.com/2010/04/29/almost-one-in-three-mothers-suffers-mental-health-problems/00587

      Posted by
      Robert Karl Stonjek

    • Martin Swain
      Hi Robert, This is a rather ridiculous claim. I suppose the criteria used to evaluate poor mental health is the DSM or something like it. I m not certain
      Message 2 of 6 , Apr 29, 2010
        Message
        Hi Robert,
          This is a rather ridiculous claim. I suppose the criteria used to evaluate 'poor mental health' is the DSM or something like it. I'm not certain what the basis there is for deciding what's 'normal', but clearly it's arbitrary and not a little bit wrong.
         
          Rather than creating some idealistic idea of 'normal' that only the very few can ever manage to conform to, wouldn't it make better sense to use a statistical method, such that only people who fell more than 3 standard deviations from the statistical mean would be diagnosed as 'abnormal'?
         
          They way they've phrased it it seems as though motherhood, which is undoubtably the most fundamental of all human enterprises, is somehow the cause of mental illness. I can't imagine a more nonsensical idea. Of course the kids all come out ok, but I guess that's the Scottish for you.
         
        Best Regards,
         
        Martin Swain
         
         
         

        Martin Swain

        Software Developer, Spartek Systems

         

        -----Original Message-----
        From: evolutionary-psychology@yahoogroups.com [mailto:evolutionary-psychology@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Robert Karl Stonjek
        Sent: April 29, 2010 8:23 AM
        To: Psychiatry-Research; Evolutionary-Psychology; Evolutionary Psychology News
        Subject: [evol-psych] News: Almost one in three mothers suffers mental health problems

         

        Almost one in three mothers suffers mental health problems

        April 29, 2010  by Jennifer Trueland

        Almost a third of mothers suffer poor mental health at some point in the first four or five years of their child’s life, according to a study which aims to show what it is like being a child in Scotland today.

        Growing Up in Scotland (GUS) – which tracks the experiences of 8,000 families – also shows that around three in ten young Scottish children are classified in living in poverty and that health inequalities are seen from the earliest point in life.

        Remarkably, given the gloomy picture in the reports, most children (over 80 per cent) do not display any difficulties with their social, emotional and behavioural difficulties when they start primary school.

        But it says that children who do not experience “smacking and shouting” and who have more social interaction with their parents and others, are less at risk of having problems with conduct and hyperactivity.

        The fourth set of findings of the study, which began in 2005, looks at issues faced by children in the first five years of their lives, including poverty, child health, behavioural development and maternal mental health.

        Maternal mental health is one of the specific areas investigated because it is believed to have a significant impact on a child’s early development.

        The report shows that almost a third of all the mothers interviewed experienced poor mental health at some point in the four years after the survey baby’s birth – at any one point, up to 16 per cent of mothers was experiencing mental health difficulties.

        Mental health was associated with a mother’s social circumstances, with those who experienced poverty, and those living in more deprived areas, more likely to experience brief and repeated mental health problems.

        Importantly, the study found that children whose mothers were emotionally well throughout the survey period had better social, behavioural and emotional development than those whose mothers had brief mental health problems, and they in turn had better development than those whose mothers had repeated mental health problems. This was the case even when socio-economic factors were taken into account.

        “By age four, children who experienced prolonged (repeated) exposure to a mother with mental health problems were particularly likely to have poor behavioural, emotional and social outcomes. At the point when they are about to start formal education, these early deficits may affect their transition to school and their subsequent development and attainment,” the report says.

        Although they cannot say how or why maternal mental health had an impact on children’s outcomes, the authors “postulate that deficits in attachment may play a role by disrupting the mother-child relationship, inhibiting the nature and quality of their interactions” .

        They call for better support for mothers with mental health problems, saying it may have a direct impact on young children’s development and well-being – and could improve their early experiences of school.

        A separate report (also part of the GUS study) on children’s social, emotional and behavioural characteristics when starting primary school, shows that while the vast majority report no problems, around 20 per cent do. This was highest for problems related to conduct, where 27 per cent did not score in the accepted “normal” range.

        While conduct problems were most prevalent, emotional problems were the least so, the report says.

        Children who suffered poorer health between the ages of two and five were consistently more likely to have greater behavioural difficulties when they started school than those with better health.

        Children who experienced no shouting or smacking, higher levels of social interaction with their parents, and a higher frequency of social visits were less likely to have problems with conduct and hyperactivity, the report says.

        The Scottish government said that action was being taken across departments and agencies to improve children’s lives in the early years. Shona Robison, the public health minister said: “No-one should be condemned to a life of ill health because of where they live or their family’s background. Poor health is not inevitable and we should not accept it.”

        She said health in Scotland is improving but not quickly enough, but that strategies such as Equally Well, the Report of the Ministerial Task Force on Health Inequalities, had shifted the emphasis from dealing with the consequences of health inequalities to tackling the underlying causes such as poverty, employment, support for families and improving physical and social environments.

        “Supporting women to have as healthy a pregnancy as possible is vitally important. That is why the Maternity Services Action Group is refreshing the framework for maternity services in reducing health inequalities and improving health – particularly amongst women with the greatest needs,” she added.

        Source: Caledonian Mercury
        http://health. caledonianmercur y.com/2010/ 04/29/almost- one-in-three- mothers-suffers- mental-health- problems/ 00587

        Posted by
        Robert Karl Stonjek

      • Edgar Owen
        Martin, I agree with you on this one. To me it sounds like one more typical PC pseudo-scientific attempt to confirm the victim status of one of the supposed
        Message 3 of 6 , Apr 30, 2010
          Martin,

          I agree with you on this one. To me it sounds like one more typical PC pseudo-scientific attempt to confirm the victim status of one of the supposed victims of evil white male dominated society....

          There is no doubt that US society exploits and causes psychological problems for people of ALL genders and ethnicities but that is a much different issue....

          Edgar



          On Apr 29, 2010, at 10:55 AM, Martin Swain wrote:

          >
          > Hi Robert,
          > This is a rather ridiculous claim. I suppose the criteria used to evaluate 'poor mental health' is the DSM or something like it. I'm not certain what the basis there is for deciding what's 'normal', but clearly it's arbitrary and not a little bit wrong.
          >
          > Rather than creating some idealistic idea of 'normal' that only the very few can ever manage to conform to, wouldn't it make better sense to use a statistical method, such that only people who fell more than 3 standard deviations from the statistical mean would be diagnosed as 'abnormal'?
          >
          > They way they've phrased it it seems as though motherhood, which is undoubtably the most fundamental of all human enterprises, is somehow the cause of mental illness. I can't imagine a more nonsensical idea. Of course the kids all come out ok, but I guess that's the Scottish for you.
          >
          > Best Regards,
          >
          > Martin Swain
          >
          >
          >
          > Martin Swain
          >
          > Software Developer, Spartek Systems
          <Snip>
        • Helga V
          I agree that this is a rather high estimate. But i disagree that the kids all come out okay. I am married to a Scot, and what i see in his family is the very
          Message 4 of 6 , Apr 30, 2010
            I agree that this is a rather high estimate. But i disagree that the kids all come out okay. I am married to a Scot, and what i see in his family is the very opposite of okay. And this is nor unusual within Scotland as a whole. Drinking, smoking, swearing, bullying, belittling, and other forms of abuse are passed down through the generations in many families... the Scots have similar statistics in terms of life expectancy, rates of delinquency, incomplete education, unemployment, health, rates of divorce etc compared to the British norms as do the First Nations peoples on reservations compared to the norms for the rest of Canada.

            The effects of early neglect and abuse can cause life-long changes in stress hormones and vulnerability to depression and anxiety... and a host of other problems. this is of course not just a problem in Scotland! regards, Helga

            http://pediatrics.aappublications.org/cgi/content/abstract/peds.2009-2678v1
            http://www.physorg.com/news186330465.html
            http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/06/090610124424.htm
            http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/02/100223154342.htm
            http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2007/03/070305202905.htm
            http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2007/10/071001172845.htm
            http://researchnews.osu.edu/archive/healthcosts.htm
            http://news.discovery.com/human/abuse-brain-mother-child.html
            http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/09/090922132844.htm
            http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/04/100405174940.htm
            http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2007/06/070613071205.htm
            http://www.nature.com/neuro/journal/vaop/ncurrent/full/nn.2468.html
            http://www.physorg.com/news184402270.html
            http://www.physorg.com/news180015329.html
            http://www.physorg.com/news155240528.html
            http://www.physorg.com/news183659936.html

            --- In evolutionary-psychology@yahoogroups.com, "Martin Swain" <martin.swain@...> wrote:
            >
            > Hi Robert,
            > This is a rather ridiculous claim. I suppose the criteria used to evaluate
            > 'poor mental health' is the DSM or something like it. I'm not certain what
            > the basis there is for deciding what's 'normal', but clearly it's arbitrary
            > and not a little bit wrong.
            >
            > Rather than creating some idealistic idea of 'normal' that only the very
            > few can ever manage to conform to, wouldn't it make better sense to use a
            > statistical method, such that only people who fell more than 3 standard
            > deviations from the statistical mean would be diagnosed as 'abnormal'?
            >
            > They way they've phrased it it seems as though motherhood, which is
            > undoubtably the most fundamental of all human enterprises, is somehow the
            > cause of mental illness. I can't imagine a more nonsensical idea. Of course
            > the kids all come out ok, but I guess that's the Scottish for you.
            >
            > Best Regards,
            >
            > Martin Swain
            >
            >
            >
            >
            > Martin Swain
            >
            > Software Developer, Spartek Systems
            >
            >
            >
            > -----Original Message-----
            > From: evolutionary-psychology@yahoogroups.com
            > [mailto:evolutionary-psychology@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Robert Karl
            > Stonjek
            > Sent: April 29, 2010 8:23 AM
            > To: Psychiatry-Research; Evolutionary-Psychology; Evolutionary Psychology
            > News
            > Subject: [evol-psych] News: Almost one in three mothers suffers mental
            > health problems
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >
            > Almost one in three mothers suffers mental health problems
            >
            >
            > April 29, 2010 by Jennifer Trueland
            >
            > Almost a third of mothers suffer poor mental health at some point in the
            > first four or five years of their child's life, according to a study which
            > aims to show what it is like being a child in Scotland today.
            >
            > Growing Up in Scotland (GUS) - which tracks the experiences of 8,000
            > families - also shows that around three in ten young Scottish children are
            > classified in living in poverty and that health inequalities are seen from
            > the earliest point in life.
            >
            > Remarkably, given the gloomy picture in the reports, most children (over 80
            > per cent) do not display any difficulties with their social, emotional and
            > behavioural difficulties when they start primary school.
            >
            > But it says that children who do not experience "smacking and shouting" and
            > who have more social interaction with their parents and others, are less at
            > risk of having problems with conduct and hyperactivity.
            >
            > The fourth set of findings of the study, which began in 2005, looks at
            > issues faced by children in the first five years of their lives, including
            > poverty, child health, behavioural development and maternal mental health.
            >
            > Maternal mental health is one of the specific areas investigated because it
            > is believed to have a significant impact on a child's early development.
            >
            > The report shows that almost a third of all the mothers interviewed
            > experienced poor mental health at some point in the four years after the
            > survey baby's birth - at any one point, up to 16 per cent of mothers was
            > experiencing mental health difficulties.
            >
            > Mental health was associated with a mother's social circumstances, with
            > those who experienced poverty, and those living in more deprived areas, more
            > likely to experience brief and repeated mental health problems.
            >
            > Importantly, the study found that children whose mothers were emotionally
            > well throughout the survey period had better social, behavioural and
            > emotional development than those whose mothers had brief mental health
            > problems, and they in turn had better development than those whose mothers
            > had repeated mental health problems. This was the case even when
            > socio-economic factors were taken into account.
            >
            > "By age four, children who experienced prolonged (repeated) exposure to a
            > mother with mental health problems were particularly likely to have poor
            > behavioural, emotional and social outcomes. At the point when they are about
            > to start formal education, these early deficits may affect their transition
            > to school and their subsequent development and attainment," the report says.
            >
            > Although they cannot say how or why maternal mental health had an impact on
            > children's outcomes, the authors "postulate that deficits in attachment may
            > play a role by disrupting the mother-child relationship, inhibiting the
            > nature and quality of their interactions".
            >
            > They call for better support for mothers with mental health problems, saying
            > it may have a direct impact on young children's development and well-being -
            > and could improve their early experiences of school.
            >
            > A separate report (also part of the GUS study) on children's social,
            > emotional and behavioural characteristics when starting primary school,
            > shows that while the vast majority report no problems, around 20 per cent
            > do. This was highest for problems related to conduct, where 27 per cent did
            > not score in the accepted "normal" range.
            >
            > While conduct problems were most prevalent, emotional problems were the
            > least so, the report says.
            >
            > Children who suffered poorer health between the ages of two and five were
            > consistently more likely to have greater behavioural difficulties when they
            > started school than those with better health.
            >
            > Children who experienced no shouting or smacking, higher levels of social
            > interaction with their parents, and a higher frequency of social visits were
            > less likely to have problems with conduct and hyperactivity, the report
            > says.
            >
            > The Scottish government said that action was being taken across departments
            > and agencies to improve children's lives in the early years. Shona Robison,
            > the public health minister said: "No-one should be condemned to a life of
            > ill health because of where they live or their family's background. Poor
            > health is not inevitable and we should not accept it."
            >
            > She said health in Scotland is improving but not quickly enough, but that
            > strategies such as Equally Well, the Report of the Ministerial Task Force on
            > Health Inequalities, had shifted the emphasis from dealing with the
            > consequences of health inequalities to tackling the underlying causes such
            > as poverty, employment, support for families and improving physical and
            > social environments.
            >
            > "Supporting women to have as healthy a pregnancy as possible is vitally
            > important. That is why the Maternity Services Action Group is refreshing the
            > framework for maternity services in reducing health inequalities and
            > improving health - particularly amongst women with the greatest needs," she
            > added.
            >
            > Source: Caledonian Mercury
            > http://health.
            > <http://health.caledonianmercury.com/2010/04/29/almost-one-in-three-mothers-
            > suffers-mental-health-problems/00587>
            > caledonianmercury.com/2010/04/29/almost-one-in-three-mothers-suffers-mental-
            > health-problems/00587
            >
            > Posted by
            > Robert Karl Stonjek
            >
          • mark hubey
            The whole point of the excess-feminism is exactly that e.g. why do they have to become mothers. In other words, just by being mothers they are already cheated.
            Message 5 of 6 , May 1, 2010
              The whole point of the excess-feminism is exactly that e.g. why do they have to become mothers. In other words, just by being mothers they are already cheated. In other words, evolution already cheated them and they are cheated when they get pregnant. When the fetus was conceived female they were cheated.

              They think being male all these millenia was nothing but privilige. For example being chosen to be sacrified (e.g. David) was a privilige. Being born strong enough to be a killer so you can be drafted is a privilige. And on and on and on...

              One must read some of the literature and look deeply to see the roots of discontent. All this talk is for nothing. Only a quota system will create enough data so that it can be used in the future. It does not matter if Europeans go extinct. Others will not make the same mistake. 

              That may be necessary so that one can say "do you think we went thru 6,000,000 years of evolution, and created modern civilization so that people who can barely do fractions can take over the country, and drive it extinct?" 

              That argument can only work if there is such a thing in the historical record because the people doing the "thinking" (!) do not have enough knowledge to be able to comprehend 20th century scientific thinking. In other words they are pre-Newtonians. They need either at least scientific knowledge or data.
              On Fri, Apr 30, 2010 at 6:30 AM, Edgar Owen <edgarowen@...> wrote:
              Martin,

              I agree with you on this one. To me it sounds like one more typical PC pseudo-scientific attempt to confirm the victim status of one of the supposed victims of evil white male dominated society....

              There is no doubt that US society exploits and causes psychological problems for people of ALL genders and ethnicities but that is a much different issue....

              Edgar

              On Apr 29, 2010, at 10:55 AM, Martin Swain wrote:

              >
              > Hi Robert,
              >   This is a rather ridiculous claim. I suppose the criteria used to evaluate 'poor mental health' is the DSM or something like it. I'm not certain what the basis there is for deciding what's 'normal', but clearly it's arbitrary and not a little bit wrong.
              >
              >   Rather than creating some idealistic idea of 'normal' that only the very few can ever manage to conform to, wouldn't it make better sense to use a statistical method, such that only people who fell more than 3 standard deviations from the statistical mean would be diagnosed as 'abnormal'?
              >
              >   They way they've phrased it it seems as though motherhood, which is undoubtably the most fundamental of all human enterprises, is somehow the cause of mental illness. I can't imagine a more nonsensical idea. Of course the kids all come out ok, but I guess that's the Scottish for you.
              >
              > Best Regards,
              >
              > Martin Swain
              >
              >
              >
              > Martin Swain
              >
              > Software Developer, Spartek Systems

              <Snip>

              --
              Regards,
              Mark Hubey
            • R A Fonda
              ... Well, it matters to some of us, but it does look as if too many of our kindred are delusional, genetically maladapted to promiscuous altruism, intent on
              Message 6 of 6 , May 1, 2010

                On 5/1/2010 8:24 AM, mark hubey wrote: It does not matter if Europeans go extinct.

                Well, it matters to some of us, but it does look as if too many of our kindred are delusional, genetically maladapted to promiscuous altruism, intent on suicide, and likely to take the rest of us down with them, though I cherish the hope that a purged remnant will survive. But, as to whether it will "matter" to the rest of humanity, I suggest that the world will be an even nastier, more brutish place without us; time will tell.

                RAF

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