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  • fjjwagner
    For those who have not visited VoegelinView this week: If only the Obama Administration had read this last Summer!-- We are pleased to offer Barry Cooper s
    Message 1 of 1 , Jan 11, 2010
      For those who have not visited VoegelinView this week:

      If only the Obama Administration had read this last Summer!--
      We are pleased to offer Barry Cooper's essay "History and the Holy Koran." The first part, published this week, reviews the Athens-Jerusalem debate, featuring of course, Voegelin and Strauss; but it does so in a way that is both clear and pertinent for thinking about the deep roots of Islamic terrorism. Rigidity that forbids philosophical inquiry is how Strauss viewed Christianity and Judaism; but it really applies to Islam. And the Western intelligentsia are paralyzed by "a tolerant neutral­ity with respect to the validity or veracity of the realities expressed by the terms Athens and Jerusalem . . ."

      A Meditation on the Death which awaits us all--
      Timor mortis conturbat me. This week's poem cuts to the bone. Read William Dunbar's "Lament for the Makers," composed at the beginning of the 16th century; and to assist with the more obscure words we include a glossary.

      If Scholasticism had said it all, what was left for a philosopher to do?--
      Francesca Murphy describes Étienne Gilson's quandary in the first decade of the 20th Century: How could one be a faithful Catholic in the face of the Church's broad condemnation of modern thought? Republicanism was held to be spiritually dangerous. Bergson was condemned while Action Française was rewarded. Yet Gilson was consoled by remembering ". . . the supreme philosophical question in my eyes was to know 'why there was something rather than nothing.' I had not just read it in Leibniz, I had rather made it my own. . ." This echoes Voegelin's own appreciation. Read the last part of "Art and Philosophy in the Life of Étienne Gilson."

      A New Year's question: How should we think about time?--
      This week Eric Voegelin considers conventional, linear time, notions of the "future" and "progress," and where we stand in relation to "the river of time." "You should be aware that you use symbolisms, why you use symbolisms..." Read: "Conceptions of History, the Mathematics of Progress and the Problem of Time."

      The URL is www.voegelinview.com


      Best,

      Fritz Wagner
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