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re: Tolkien (was: This news may interest you)

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  • Bill McClain
    On Sun, 31 Aug 2003 15:36:11 -0400 ... That deserves emphasis. In one of his stories (I don t recall the title, but it is in the volume of fragments,
    Message 1 of 3 , Sep 2, 2003
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      On Sun, 31 Aug 2003 15:36:11 -0400
      Maxim Faust <maxim.faust@...> wrote:

      > Tolkien, though, was much more cautious in his expression of his faith
      > than was his closest friend, C.S. Lewis.

      That deserves emphasis. In one of his stories (I don't recall the title,
      but it is in the volume of fragments, "Morgoth's Ring", edited by his
      son) Tolkien presents a dialog on the nature of the world between a
      mortal and an immortal. They conclude that the world can only be
      redeemed by an Incarnation that still lies in (their) future.

      Tolkien decided not to publish it because "it reads too much like a
      parody of Christianity." He was quite diffident about fictional
      expositions of faith and disliked metaphor of all sorts.

      The notion that his fiction takes place in an unfallen world is just not
      true; the world has been corrupted since the beginning. The stories in
      "The Silmarillion" often show the elves in a bad light.

      -Bill
      --
      Sattre Press Tales of War
      http://sattre-press.com/ by Lord Dunsany
      info@... http://tow.sattre-press.com/
    • Dan Knauss
      Tolkien hated Lewis s Narnian books for how they jammed different mythical entities together and probably for the parodic Christianity. On Tue, 2 Sep 2003
      Message 2 of 3 , Sep 3, 2003
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        Tolkien hated Lewis's Narnian books for how they jammed different
        mythical entities together and probably for the "parodic" Christianity.

        On Tue, 2 Sep 2003 13:52:37 -0500 Bill McClain <wmcclain@...>
        writes:
        > On Sun, 31 Aug 2003 15:36:11 -0400
        > Maxim Faust <maxim.faust@...> wrote:
        >
        > > Tolkien, though, was much more cautious in his expression of his
        > faith
        > > than was his closest friend, C.S. Lewis.
        >
        > That deserves emphasis. In one of his stories (I don't recall the
        > title,
        > but it is in the volume of fragments, "Morgoth's Ring", edited by
        > his
        > son) Tolkien presents a dialog on the nature of the world between a
        > mortal and an immortal. They conclude that the world can only be
        > redeemed by an Incarnation that still lies in (their) future.
        >
        > Tolkien decided not to publish it because "it reads too much like a
        > parody of Christianity." He was quite diffident about fictional
        > expositions of faith and disliked metaphor of all sorts.
        >
        > The notion that his fiction takes place in an unfallen world is just
        > not
        > true; the world has been corrupted since the beginning. The stories
        > in
        > "The Silmarillion" often show the elves in a bad light.
        >
        > -Bill
        > --
        > Sattre Press Tales of War
        > http://sattre-press.com/ by Lord Dunsany
        > info@... http://tow.sattre-press.com/
        >
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