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mated perhaps, but not bonded

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  • dermestid
    I ve posted in the mated and bonded pairs album an image of a coin that is being offered as a bonded pair. I don t think so. The obverse and reverse
    Message 1 of 1195 , Feb 1, 2002
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      I've posted in the "mated and bonded pairs" album
      an image of a coin that is being offered as a bonded
      pair. I don't think so.<br><br>The obverse and reverse
      designs created by the final strike are not aligned with
      each other. That violates a cardinal and inescapable
      rule of bonded pairs.<br><br>I suspect that this is a
      mated pair in which an enterprising individual has
      inexpertly glued the bottom coin to the top coin. I've seen
      this before. People will take valuable errors and try
      to make them even more valuable. I've heard of cases
      in which a person will take a deep obverse die cap
      and cram as many normal cents into the cup as they
      can so as to make it as heavy as possible. Then they
      try to sell it as 5 or 6 bonded coins. I have a
      bonded pair in which a third coin was loosely glued to
      the bottom member of the pair.<br><br>This coin is
      still a very nice and a very unusual error, but it
      ain't what it's purported to be.
    • Mike Diamond
      It s not often that I address a post this old (8/24/2001). However, I did get to see once again the 1962 cent that I thought had four sets of raised, parallel
      Message 1195 of 1195 , Nov 10, 2003
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        It's not often that I address a post this old (8/24/2001). However,
        I did get to see once again the 1962 cent that I thought had four
        sets of raised, parallel profiles of Lincoln. My initial impression
        based on a brief examination at a coin show was wrong. It actually
        had four sets of INCUSE images. It was a shifted cap strike. The
        coin had been struck through a die cap that had experienced three
        previous shift-and-strike events.

        So now I'm back to two sets of expansion ripples as the maximum I've
        yet come across. I still don't have an explanation that I'm
        comfortable with, though.

        --- In errorcoininformationexchange@yahoogroups.com, dermestid wrote:
        > You'll find in the "oddball errors" album an
        > image of 10c capped die strike with one set of
        > "expansion ripples" extending out from the head of
        > Roosevelt. Expansion ripples are a set of vague raised
        > outlines that parallel large central design elements such
        > as busts and buildings. I have one other example in
        > my collection -- a nickel.<br><br>I wrote a short
        > article on this phenomenon some time back in Errorscope.
        > In that article I presented I plausible theory to
        > explain this phenomenon. At least it was plausible at the
        > time. There's no need to go into the details, except to
        > say that this theory can, at best, explain the
        > existance of two sets of nested expansion
        > ripples.<br><br>However, at a coin show in Chicago about a year
        ago, I saw
        > a Lincoln cent from the early '60s that showed FOUR
        > sets of expansion ripples extending out from the front
        > of Lincoln's bust. They became progressively fainter
        > the farther out from the bust you went.
        > Unfortunately, the owner wouldn't sell it at even $125. Maybe I
        > should have offered more.<br><br>Has anyone out there
        > seen multiple expansion ripples like this?
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