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coin shrapnel

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  • Mike Diamond
    If a piece of coin shrapnel can bring this kind of money, I m rather curious what a true struck fragment will bring. So will I put one up for auction. I
    Message 1 of 11 , May 3, 2005
      If a piece of coin shrapnel can bring this kind of money, I'm rather
      curious what a true struck fragment will bring. So will I put one up
      for auction. I won't post a link, since I don't want people to think
      I'm promoting one of my coins on the message board.


      --- In errorcoininformationexchange@yahoogroups.com, "Mike Diamond"
      <mdia1@a...> wrote:

      > $800 for a piece of bonded coin shrapnel is wildly excessive, in my
      > opinion. It's possible that the high bidder has no clue that it
      broke
      > away from a larger pile-up.
      >
      > I wonder what it would have sold for had it been accurately described.
    • Mike Diamond
      The coin is still in its slab. This is one coin I don t want to crack out because people are justifiably suspicious of full thickness, full diameter off-metal
      Message 2 of 11 , May 4, 2005
        The coin is still in its slab. This is one coin I don't want to
        crack out because people are justifiably suspicious of full
        thickness, full diameter off-metal errors. If I ever decided to sell
        it, it would take a serious hit in its raw state.

        I actually saw the coin before it was slabbed. It was discovered in
        my home town, and one of my local dealers showed it to me. It was
        apparently found in a newspaper vending machine by the fellow who
        gathers up the change at the end of the week. It made quite a
        circuit from the local coin shop, to a Heritage auction, to Fred's
        site, onto eBay, and back home to my collection. It didn't
        appreciate much in price through that circuit. I guess it doesn't
        have "eye appeal". But I like it for what it represents.

        I'm curious where you're getting your information about foreign coins
        struck at the Mint post-1980. Anything I can tap into?

        --- In errorcoininformationexchange@yahoogroups.com, "mrlindy2000"
        <adkinstone@a...> wrote:
        > ahhh, that was solid color 25c. No sandwich metal. That IS a more
        > intersting wrong planchet 25c.
        >
        > You had to crack that out of it's slab to see the bonus.
        >
        > ;^)
        >
        > Those solid metal planchets were produced for the Dominican in 1982
        > also. That is asumming they didn't switch to sandwich clad.
        >
        > My bu blow hole 83 cent is so incredibly nice I cannot $450 for it.
        >
        > It's gotta be MS67, if being flawless and bright red matters?
        >
        > I think this error collector mindset contributes to the ever
        > increasing error values.
        >
        > When errors find a new home they remain for years or decades.
        >
        > Lindy
      • Kevin
        Mike, I just looked at the photo. It looks like the fragment looks eliptical on two sides. Could it have been a clean football shape going into the press and
        Message 3 of 11 , May 4, 2005
          Mike,

          I just looked at the photo. It looks like the fragment looks
          eliptical on two sides. Could it have been a clean football shape
          going into the press and the present irregularity merely do to the
          spreading of the metal during minting?

          Kevin


          --- In errorcoininformationexchange@yahoogroups.com, "Mike Diamond"
          <mdia1@a...> wrote:
          > If a piece of coin shrapnel can bring this kind of money, I'm rather
          > curious what a true struck fragment will bring. So will I put one up
          > for auction. I won't post a link, since I don't want people to think
          > I'm promoting one of my coins on the message board.
          >
        • Mike Diamond
          ... You might be right. Anyway, it s academic at this point since I plan to keep it for a long time. ... Do you have a link to the on-line Coin World article
          Message 4 of 11 , May 4, 2005
            --- In errorcoininformationexchange@yahoogroups.com, "mrlindy2000"
            <adkinstone@a...> wrote:

            > Since it's solid metal the sandwich-free I think seeing the
            >sandwich free reeding would be a big plus when you sold it.

            You might be right. Anyway, it's academic at this point since I plan
            to keep it for a long time.

            > Thats one of my best held secrets:
            > that "post-1980" info you slyly seek.

            Do you have a link to the on-line Coin World article that contains
            the post-1980 information? I only could find the article that goes
            up to 1926.

            I've seen a few other post-1984 U.S. coins on foreign coins or
            planchets. I know there are a few Sac dollars like this, and a few
            months back "paperchasesue" sold a recent nickel struck on a smaller
            steel planchet.

            I suspect that the Mint occasionally gets planchets from the Royal
            Canadian Mint and from private outside suppliers for denominations
            other than cents. Years ago some guys from my local coin club came
            back from a plant in Iowa that supplied dime blanks to the Mint, and
            they brought back chopped webbing to prove it.
          • Mike Diamond
            Another reason I like Fred s quarter is that overweight foreign planchet errors are tough to come by. The only similar error I have in my collection is a 1919
            Message 5 of 11 , May 4, 2005
              Another reason I like Fred's quarter is that overweight foreign
              planchet errors are tough to come by. The only similar error I have in
              my collection is a 1919 cent struck on a 3.4g Cu-Ni foreign planchet,
              presumably that of an Argentina 20 centavos.

              Man, I remember back around 1999/2000, the latter were selling for $80
              in VF condition. I saw three sell at that level (two 1919, one 1920),
              and I bought the last one. Good thing I did, as they've really
              skyrocketed. Wish I would've bought them all. But back then, the
              place to invest was high-tech and communications stocks. Too funny.

              --- In errorcoininformationexchange@yahoogroups.com, "mrlindy2000"
              <adkinstone@a...> wrote:
              > ahhh, that was solid color 25c. No sandwich metal. That IS a more
              > intersting wrong planchet 25c.
            • Mike Diamond
              Thanks. I ll just write Eric Von Klinger for a copy. When I get it, I ll share the data with the rest of you.
              Message 6 of 11 , May 4, 2005
                Thanks. I'll just write Eric Von Klinger for a copy. When I get it,
                I'll share the data with the rest of you.

                --- In errorcoininformationexchange@yahoogroups.com, "mrlindy2000"
                <adkinstone@a...> wrote:

                > Maybe the coinworld link is gone now. 2 or 3 years there I've
                > noticed links and features disappear as newer material gets
                > broadcast.
                >
                > It was published in the last few years. I did not note it's author,
                > but it was in coinworld for sure.
              • Mike Diamond
                It s definitely not an elliptical clip. There are a variety of edge textures, but you don t see the belly line or breakaway zone characteristic of
                Message 7 of 11 , May 6, 2005
                  It's definitely not an elliptical clip. There are a variety of edge
                  textures, but you don't see the "belly line" or "breakaway zone"
                  characteristic of blanking shear.

                  There's only a little bit of roughness on the edge, so I don't think
                  this one originated by the blanking die slicing through a region of
                  interlacing cracks and fissures. If that were the case, the entire
                  edge would look grainy.

                  The origin of this fragment is therefore a complete mystery. I have no
                  doubt it's real. There is subtle metal flow in some of the design
                  elements bordering the irregular edge. Also, there is no sign of
                  mechanical damage and no pressure ridges on either face next to the
                  irregular edge.


                  --- In errorcoininformationexchange@yahoogroups.com, "Kevin"
                  <Grimaldon@y...> wrote:

                  > Mike,
                  >
                  > I just looked at the photo. It looks like the fragment looks
                  > eliptical on two sides. Could it have been a clean football shape
                  > going into the press and the present irregularity merely do to the
                  > spreading of the metal during minting?
                  >
                  > Kevin
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