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Error Grading

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  • bunchthomas
    Hello, I posted 4 different coins in this sites folder named error grading and would appreciate any information on these. Some photos have 2 coins which is
    Message 1 of 4 , Apr 4, 2005
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      Hello,
      I posted 4 different coins in this sites folder named "error grading"
      and would appreciate any information on these.
      Some photos have 2 coins which is done side by side with a normal coin
      to compare with.
      One is a quarter that looks all copper, with smudged letters and
      details under extremely thin silver plate. No reeds.
      One is a nickle with what appears to be flip over damage on both sides.
      One is a dime with a thick, cupped edge on both sides. No reeds.
      The last coin is a thin dime, also with no reeds.
      I've owned these for quite a while and would like to know if these
      could be fakes.
      Thank you.
    • Mike Diamond
      Regrettably, they are all fakes. The dime with the smooth edge was rolled through a device that squeezed it at the same time. The convex edge and high rim
      Message 2 of 4 , Apr 4, 2005
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        Regrettably, they are all fakes.

        The dime with the smooth edge was rolled through a device that squeezed
        it at the same time. The convex edge and high "rim" are characteristic.

        The nickel is a "sandwich job". Another nickel was pressed into it.

        The quarter is a struck counterfeit in which fake dies were used on a
        counterfeit planchet.

        The dime had its surface abraded outside the Mint.

        --- In errorcoininformationexchange@yahoogroups.com, "bunchthomas"
        <goldpans@i...> wrote:
        >
        > Hello,
        > I posted 4 different coins in this sites folder named "error grading"
        > and would appreciate any information on these.
        > Some photos have 2 coins which is done side by side with a normal
        coin
        > to compare with.
        > One is a quarter that looks all copper, with smudged letters and
        > details under extremely thin silver plate. No reeds.
        > One is a nickle with what appears to be flip over damage on both
        sides.
        > One is a dime with a thick, cupped edge on both sides. No reeds.
        > The last coin is a thin dime, also with no reeds.
        > I've owned these for quite a while and would like to know if these
        > could be fakes.
        > Thank you.
      • Mike Diamond
        ... Believe it or not, people apparently make these to spend. I suppose if you make enough of them, it could pay off. I ve got one of these fakes myself, and
        Message 3 of 4 , Apr 5, 2005
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          --- In errorcoininformationexchange@yahoogroups.com, "bunchthomas"
          <goldpans@i...> wrote:
          >
          > Thanks for the info Mr. Diamond.
          > I trust your judgement, but for the life of me cannot understand why
          > someone would go thru so much trouble to counterfiet an insignificant
          > quarter.

          Believe it or not, people apparently make these to spend. I suppose if
          you make enough of them, it could pay off. I've got one of these fakes
          myself, and have seen others. Silver (or silvery) plating over a
          copper planchet is a common composition in these counterfeits.

          > On what I called a "thin dime", if this was ground down, shouldn't
          > some clad or copper be visible.

          You'd be surprised at how much metal can be removed before the copper
          core shows. Occasionally it does peek through along the edge. The
          flattish appearance of the bust and the flat, slightly sloping
          periphery are characteristic of these sorts of alterations.

          Also there is what I've heard what is
          > called "filled dies". The mint mark is completely filled and some of
          > the leaves on the reverse side also look filled.

          A filled die error should show a pretty normal design rim. Yours is
          absent. I suspect the edge of your coin looks thinner than normal. A
          filled die error should show an edge of normal or greater-than-normal
          thickness.

          > Let me know what you think.
          > Thanks.
        • Mike Diamond
          Thickness appears the same. However, it s clear that the reeding on the weakly struck dime was obliterated outside the Mint. If this was a genuine case of
          Message 4 of 4 , Apr 5, 2005
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            Thickness appears the same. However, it's clear that the reeding on
            the "weakly struck" dime was obliterated outside the Mint. If this
            was a genuine case of a coin struck out-of-collar (a cause of absent
            reeding) 1) the diameter would be greater than a normal dime, and 2)
            the edge would be trapezoidal in vertical cross section, not flat.
            If this was a genuine weak strike, 1) there would be a
            recognizable "proto-rim" along the periphery of the coin, 2) the edge
            would be trapezoidal in cross-section, 3) the rim/edge junction would
            be beveled, 4) traces of reeding would be found in the middle of the
            edge, not along the margin, 5) there would be weakness on the reverse
            opposite Roosevelt's head.

            All signs of a genuine broadstrike and a genuine weak strike are
            absent. The featureless ring on each face is smooth and lacks
            tumbling marks. Yet another indicator of fakery. This coin is bad
            to the bone. :)

            --- In errorcoininformationexchange@yahoogroups.com, "bunchthomas"
            <goldpans@i...> wrote:
            >
            > I included a picture of this "thin dime" (no reeding)along side a
            > normal dime leaning on edge supported by a soda cap.
            > They look the same thickness to me, but I'm 3/4 blind.
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