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Re: die fatigue

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  • Mike Diamond
    There s a small premium on severe cases of die fatigue. I ve paid as much as $10 for really severe cases, and even more for unusual manifestations of die
    Message 1 of 2 , Mar 29, 2005
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      There's a small premium on severe cases of die fatigue. I've paid as
      much as $10 for really severe cases, and even more for unusual
      manifestations of die fatigue. When the design is a blobby mess, then
      people take notice.

      Higher prices are warranted for premature, accelerated, and localized
      die distortion -- so-called "soft die errors". The best known and most
      readily available example is the 1943-S "goiter neck" quarter where IN
      GOD WE TRUST looks to have been written in italics. I've heard tell of
      a 1926-D buffalo nickel with a soft die error on the reverse, but I've
      not seen a photo. There are other examples. I wrote an article on the
      topic some years back for Errorscope.

      Die subsidence errors -- another form of localized die distortion --
      are also worth a bit of money. But these are usually found in
      association with split dies, and the value is related to the latter
      error.

      It sounds like you've got quite a nice example of conventional die
      deterioration.

      --- In errorcoininformationexchange@yahoogroups.com, "Kevin L. Stewart"
      <Grimaldon@y...> wrote:
      > Is there any premium put on coins that evidence substantial die
      fatigue? I've
      > got a quarter where the lines of the letters are nearly triple
      width. It's
      > about the most fatigued I've seen.
      >
      > Kevin
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