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Freestanding interior die break

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  • Mike Diamond
    This die chip is large enough to qualify as a freestanding interior die break: http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&item=3949769330 This is the second
    Message 1 of 4 , Jan 2, 2005
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      This die chip is large enough to qualify as a freestanding interior
      die break:

      http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&item=3949769330

      This is the second example I've seen of this particular die break, so
      I'm pretty sure it's the real thing, rather than a drop of solder.

      I must say, though, that it's occurring in a very odd location -- the
      field. Most die chips occur where there is an intrinsic weakness in
      the die face, e.g., where the design creates a pedestal that is
      susceptible to breaking off. In fact, I just got a Mass quarter with
      a nice sized die chip in the ribbon that ties up Washington's pony
      tail. That's a more sensible location for a die chip.

      It's possible that the die struck some hard object which knocked a
      flake off.

      I know these things don't bring much money, but I have always been
      willing to pay more than market price for errors that interest me.
      So if any of you have some especially large die chips or interior die
      breaks, let's talk turkey.
    • Jason
      I was looking at this coin, but because of it s unusual location (the field) it seemed to me that it was more likely a bubble in the layers. I was also
      Message 2 of 4 , Jan 3, 2005
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        I was looking at this coin, but because of it's unusual location (the field)
        it seemed to me that it was more likely a bubble in the layers. I was also
        looking for an area of weakness on the reverse. I didn't see it. I would
        love to hear the update on this one. Next time I won't pass.

        -Jason

        -----Original Message-----
        From: Mike Diamond [mailto:mdia1@...]
        Sent: Sunday, January 02, 2005 8:16 PM
        To: errorcoininformationexchange@yahoogroups.com
        Subject: [Error Coin Information Exchange] Freestanding interior die break



        This die chip is large enough to qualify as a freestanding interior
        die break:

        http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&item=3949769330

        This is the second example I've seen of this particular die break, so
        I'm pretty sure it's the real thing, rather than a drop of solder.

        I must say, though, that it's occurring in a very odd location -- the
        field. Most die chips occur where there is an intrinsic weakness in
        the die face, e.g., where the design creates a pedestal that is
        susceptible to breaking off. In fact, I just got a Mass quarter with
        a nice sized die chip in the ribbon that ties up Washington's pony
        tail. That's a more sensible location for a die chip.

        It's possible that the die struck some hard object which knocked a
        flake off.

        I know these things don't bring much money, but I have always been
        willing to pay more than market price for errors that interest me.
        So if any of you have some especially large die chips or interior die
        breaks, let's talk turkey.






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      • Mike Diamond
        I have never seen a bubble such as you describe, except in coins that have been heat-treated outside the mint. I think the first time I saw this error I
        Message 3 of 4 , Jan 3, 2005
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          I have never seen a "bubble" such as you describe, except in coins
          that have been heat-treated outside the mint.

          I think the first time I saw this error I passed on it, because I was
          suspicious. This time I figured that an identical specimen is pretty
          good evidence that it's legit. I don't think the deficit is large
          enough to create any weakness on the reverse face.

          I have seen a much larger freestanding interior die break on the
          reverse of a 1999 cent. That one did show a featureless hollow on
          the opposite face. I sure wish I had grabbed it when I had the
          chance, as I've not seen another example.

          --- In errorcoininformationexchange@yahoogroups.com, "Jason"
          <jason@k...> wrote:
          > I was looking at this coin, but because of it's unusual location
          (the field)
          > it seemed to me that it was more likely a bubble in the layers. I
          was also
          > looking for an area of weakness on the reverse. I didn't see it.
          I would
          > love to hear the update on this one. Next time I won't pass.
          >
          > -Jason
        • Mike Diamond
          I now have the coin and can confirm that it is a freestanding interior die break. I see no surrounding die damage, so there is no evidence to support an
          Message 4 of 4 , Jan 11, 2005
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            I now have the coin and can confirm that it is a freestanding
            interior die break. I see no surrounding die damage, so there is no
            evidence to support an impact as the cause of the die break. Then
            again, I also can't prove that it was entirely spontaneous. The die
            break did carry away the tip of Washington's chin, but otherwise it
            is confined to the field.

            I'm quite happy with it.

            --- In errorcoininformationexchange@yahoogroups.com, "Mike Diamond"
            <mdia1@a...> wrote:
            >
            > I have never seen a "bubble" such as you describe, except in coins
            > that have been heat-treated outside the mint.
            >
            > I think the first time I saw this error I passed on it, because I
            was
            > suspicious. This time I figured that an identical specimen is
            pretty
            > good evidence that it's legit. I don't think the deficit is large
            > enough to create any weakness on the reverse face.
            >
            > I have seen a much larger freestanding interior die break on the
            > reverse of a 1999 cent. That one did show a featureless hollow on
            > the opposite face. I sure wish I had grabbed it when I had the
            > chance, as I've not seen another example.
            >
            > --- In errorcoininformationexchange@yahoogroups.com, "Jason"
            > <jason@k...> wrote:
            > > I was looking at this coin, but because of it's unusual location
            > (the field)
            > > it seemed to me that it was more likely a bubble in the layers.
            I
            > was also
            > > looking for an area of weakness on the reverse. I didn't see
            it.
            > I would
            > > love to hear the update on this one. Next time I won't pass.
            > >
            > > -Jason
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