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Re: 1970D Die Cap Cent: how many strikes to create it?

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  • Mike Diamond
    I agree that this is a bona fide die cap and that it was struck numerous times. Those high, sheer, vertical walls are unmistakable. Since there is no trace of
    Message 1 of 4 , Dec 1, 2004
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      I agree that this is a bona fide die cap and that it was struck
      numerous times. Those high, sheer, vertical walls are unmistakable.

      Since there is no trace of a design (raised or incuse) on the side
      walls, it most likely started out as a uniface cent.

      --- In errorcoininformationexchange@yahoogroups.com, "mrlindy2000"
      <adkinstone@a...> wrote:
      >
      > I remember seeing this style die cap in the early 80's at a couple
      > coin shows I attended. Persaonally I like the classic thimbal shape
      > cap as opposed to gun shell cap. I am wondering how many strikes it
      > took to create it. I'd guess more than 25.
      >
      > http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&item=3943805493
      >
      > Lindy
    • Mike Diamond
      I really couldn t say how many strikes were involved. Since it appears that there was no lateral expansion of the cap (i.e. it has retained the diameter of a
      Message 2 of 4 , Dec 1, 2004
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        I really couldn't say how many strikes were involved. Since it
        appears that there was no lateral expansion of the cap (i.e. it has
        retained the diameter of a normal cent), this would imply that the
        coins it struck were all in-collar.

        Since expansion of the cap is largely dependent on expansion of the
        underlying coin (remember, no sliding is permitted), the cap could
        only have creeped upward by a very small amount with each strike.

        Considering how high the walls are, I expect there was a very large
        number of strikes involved. I'd guess that 25 strikes is a minimum
        number.

        --- In errorcoininformationexchange@yahoogroups.com, "mrlindy2000"
        <adkinstone@a...> wrote:
        >
        > I am glad we agree on this being multi-multistruck bullet shell
        cap. I
        > think this took 300 strikes to create it and not just "25": my
        super
        > low end guess. Is "300" too high a strike thru number for you? If
        its
        > too high, what is your strike count guess Mike?
        >
        > Lindy
      • Mike Diamond
        I have one die cap like this, a 1999 cent. It s walls are almost half an inch high, but may have been higher as there is some telescoping. The cap is not
        Message 3 of 4 , Dec 1, 2004
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          I have one die cap like this, a 1999 cent. It's walls are almost
          half an inch high, but may have been higher as there is some
          telescoping. The cap is not laterally expanded at all and is bonded
          to another cent which was struck fully within the collar, as would be
          expected of this sort of die cap.

          It only cost me $200 on eBay (ah, those were the good old days), and
          came from Alan Levy. Its only flaw is some dried glue on the
          reverse. According to Alan, someone glued another cent to the bottom
          of the bonded pair to create a fake bonded trio. A feeble attempt at
          an "enhanced error". Alan simply pulled the added cent off.

          I can't tell whether the die cap started with a normal reverse, a
          brockaged reverse, or a uniface reverse. There's no design on the
          side walls, but those side walls have totally lost their copper
          plating, suggesting any design may have been erased during the many
          strikes it took to create this cap.

          --- In errorcoininformationexchange@yahoogroups.com, "Mike Diamond"
          <mdia1@a...> wrote:
          >
          > I really couldn't say how many strikes were involved. Since it
          > appears that there was no lateral expansion of the cap (i.e. it has
          > retained the diameter of a normal cent), this would imply that the
          > coins it struck were all in-collar.
          >
          > Since expansion of the cap is largely dependent on expansion of the
          > underlying coin (remember, no sliding is permitted), the cap could
          > only have creeped upward by a very small amount with each strike.
          >
          > Considering how high the walls are, I expect there was a very large
          > number of strikes involved. I'd guess that 25 strikes is a minimum
          > number.
          >
          > --- In errorcoininformationexchange@yahoogroups.com, "mrlindy2000"
          > <adkinstone@a...> wrote:
          > >
          > > I am glad we agree on this being multi-multistruck bullet shell
          > cap. I
          > > think this took 300 strikes to create it and not just "25": my
          > super
          > > low end guess. Is "300" too high a strike thru number for you? If
          > its
          > > too high, what is your strike count guess Mike?
          > >
          > > Lindy
        • Mike Diamond
          In summary, the rate of growth of the cap wall is largely dependent on whether the coins it strikes are confined by the collar. If the coins being struck are
          Message 4 of 4 , Dec 1, 2004
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            In summary, the rate of growth of the cap wall is largely dependent
            on whether the coins it strikes are confined by the collar. If the
            coins being struck are confined by the collar, then the height of the
            cap wall can only increase by small increments. It will take many
            strikes to create a cap like the 1970-D cent.

            If the bottom coin is not confined by the collar, then growth of the
            cap wall will be very rapid. The cupped broadstrikes with reverse
            brockages we spoke of earlier were struck out-of-collar as was the
            coin each of them struck. As a result, a moderately high, cap-like
            wall was created instantaneously.

            If the bottom coin is partly confined by the collar, then growth of
            the cap wall will be intermediate.

            It's possible that the collar itself gives a slight assist to cap
            wall growth, if the edge of the die cap has trouble fitting into the
            collar. However, since I seldom see collar scars on the outer wall
            of tall die caps, this is probably not an important factor.
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