Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Unusual shifted cap strike

Expand Messages
  • Mike Diamond
    This cent was struck through a shifted, late-stage die cap: http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&rd=1&item=3933507203 I don t see any evidence that
    Message 1 of 2 , Oct 3, 2004
    • 0 Attachment
      This cent was struck through a shifted, late-stage die cap:

      http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&rd=1&item=3933507203

      I don't see any evidence that this coin was struck more than once.

      The presence of normally oriented incuse design elements is typical
      of such errors, as is the crescentic "zone of collapse" next to it.
      This zone, marked by closely spaced curved lines, represents the
      collapsed wall of the die cap.

      One thing that is decidedly odd about this coin is that beyond the
      zone of collapse, the coin's surface is still struck through. You
      typically see die-struck metal beyond the zone of collapse.

      Perhaps the pattern of collapse was unusual, or perhaps another blank
      inserted itself between die and the dislodged cap. Hard to say.
    • Mike Diamond
      Here s an unusual shifted cap strike that seems to have slipped beneath the radar: http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&item=3964234793 The coin was
      Message 2 of 2 , Mar 20, 2005
      • 0 Attachment
        Here's an unusual shifted cap strike that seems to have slipped
        beneath the radar:

        http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&item=3964234793

        The coin was probably struck through a shifted and rotated late-stage
        die cap or perhaps a detached cap bottom. Other possibilities of
        course exist, such as a split-after-strike composite copper-and-
        zinc "shell".

        The usual normally-oriented incuse design elements are present as
        represented by Lincoln's bust and IN GOD WE TRUST. However, the date
        appears to show close, raised doubling that is out of register with
        the incuse elements. This is a very uncommon secondary effect that
        I've seen in only two other shifted/rotated cap strikes. I still
        don't have an explanation, but I continue to hope that additional
        specimens may provide the answer.

        There are several other unexplained forms of raised doubling seen in
        shifted cap strikes and that also beg explanation. But that, as they
        say, is another story.
      Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.