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Re: "die subsidence"

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  • Mike Diamond
    By the way, I borrowed the term subsidence from geology, where it means a sinking in . However, it has broader usage. It has the same root as the word
    Message 1 of 5 , Apr 19, 2004
      By the way, I borrowed the term "subsidence" from geology, where it
      means a "sinking in". However, it has broader usage. It has the
      same root as the word "subside".

      My best example is still that India 25 paise I bought from Neal
      McElroy. About 80% of the obverse (or whichever face carries the
      number) is affected by subsidence.

      Once you know what to look for, these errors start popping out at
      you. Still, they're very rare in both US and foreign issues. An
      exception may exist among India 25 paise, where I may have seen one
      or two other examples in auction photos. I suspect the die steel is
      substandard, and striking stainless steel planchets doesn't help.

      --- In errorcoininformationexchange@yahoogroups.com, fred_weinberg
      <no_reply@y...> wrote:
      > Yea Mike, you're right - all of them are about the
      > same condition.......I can't wait to see photos of
      > Lindy's high grade piece.........and your article....
      >
      > Fred
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