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Re: Lost items

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  • Mike Diamond
    I just went on the U.S. Mint website (www.usmint.gov) and looked over their instructions to customers who wish to return their items. Here s what it says For
    Message 1 of 6 , Feb 5, 2004
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      I just went on the U.S. Mint website (www.usmint.gov) and looked over
      their instructions to customers who wish to return their items.
      Here's what it says"

      "For your protection, we strongly recommend that you return your
      order by insured mail and save the receipt for your records. The U.S.
      Mint is not responsible for lost return shipments."

      So evidently the U.S. Mint itself is under the impression (correct?)
      that the post office will insure coins. If that is the case, there
      must be some unstated exception to the rule that the USPS doesn't
      insure money.


      --- In errorcoininformationexchange@yahoogroups.com, "Jerry"
      <snooker73@c...> wrote:
      > Perhaps we should check with PCGS or NGC on the shipping matter.
      Its their business to ship and insure coins they sell to their
      customers. The answer and safest way to ship will probably be the
      route they take. I would'nt doubt if a new and expensive shipping
      cost chart was made by the post office to cover any losses. Keep us
      informed please.
    • TheOcean1@aol.com
      Don t know about this years rules, but last year they lost a Certified/Insured package to me. That s when I learned that insurance isn t quite the same when
      Message 2 of 6 , Feb 5, 2004
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        Don't know about this years rules, but last year they lost a Certified/Insured package to me. That's when I learned that insurance isn't quite the same when it's purchased from the US Postal Serice.

        Their tracking system stinks. All it ever said is that it departed the sending post office. They take forever to decide that the item is lost and not likely to arrive at the incoming Post Office. They lost the item, it was insured, they cut a check for the insurance amount, right? Wrong?

        You now need to prove the value of the item was at least equal to the amount it was insured for. Ever try to explain the value of a cent struck on a dime planchet to a postal employee?

        I've heard that Fed Ex doesn't lose stuff, wonder what the USPS statistics are for lost mail.

        Ocean

      • yczavala
        Lindy, I was just telling Mike the other day that it is EXTREMELY rare for the post office to lose items. They have lost 2 items out of 6000+ shipments I have
        Message 3 of 6 , Feb 5, 2004
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          Lindy,

          I was just telling Mike the other day that it is EXTREMELY rare for
          the post office to lose items. They have lost 2 items out of 6000+
          shipments I have made in the last 3-4 years. One of them was a Greek
          gold coin I sold for $125. Of course, I needed to show proof of
          insurance (my insured receipt). You also have to fill out an
          insurance claim form. There is also a section on this form that is
          to be completed by the addressee. In that section, they have to state
          how much they paid for the item. However, I also had to produce some
          sort of proof of what I was paid. A photocopy of my receipt book
          sufficed without a problem. It took 75 days for them to pay my claim
          and of course I lost the customer because he was not going to be paid
          until I was paid.

          If your claim is on the up and up on both ends, I see no problem with
          buying a $2 receipt book to produce that proof. Please note, they
          will not refund the postage on the claim. Very ironic, since they
          charged you for a service that was not provided.

          I hope this helps y'all!

          Ynes




          --- In errorcoininformationexchange@yahoogroups.com, "mrlindy2000"
          <adkinstone@e...> wrote:
          > SO, Did the post office pay your claim after you proved its value?
          I heard(rumor) that ebay price realized is not usale as an estimate
          > for value and you cannot use it as proof of value. As far as the
          mint insuring coins it sells, don't they use registered mail only?
          Lindy
          >
          > TheOcean1@a... wrote:
          > >
          > > Don't know about this years rules, but last year they lost a
          > > Certified/Insured package to me. That's when I learned that
          insurance isn't quite the same
          > > when it's purchased from the US Postal Serice.
          > >
          > > Their tracking system stinks. All it ever said is that it
          departed the
          > > sending post office. They take forever to decide that the item is
          lost and not
          > > likely to arrive at the incoming Post Office. They lost the item,
          it was insured,
          > > they cut a check for the insurance amount, right? Wrong?
          > >
          > > You now need to prove the value of the item was at least equal
          to
          the amount
          > > it was insured for. Ever try to explain the value of a cent
          struck
          on a dime
          > > planchet to a postal employee?
          > >
          > > I've heard that Fed Ex doesn't lose stuff, wonder what the USPS
          statistics
          > > are for lost mail.
          > >
          > > Ocean
        • TheOcean1@aol.com
          Actually, Lindy, it s a long story. It was complicated by a story told to me by our city s post master, about a package he had lost. It was only insured for
          Message 4 of 6 , Feb 6, 2004
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            Actually, Lindy, it's a long story.
            It was complicated by a story told to me by our city's post master, about a package he had lost. It was only insured for $150, yet he collected it's value of $700 from insurance.

            Your observation about e-bay sales prices not being acceptable, was the point in my mentioning this experience. Kinda hard to prove the value of something you've never seen, if the price you paid won't suffice.

            And where you can easily sue FedEx, for your actual damages, the USPS is immune. They hold all the cards.
            Ocean
          • TheOcean1@aol.com
            Lindy, Fully agree, I wouldn t have even tried to collect full value, instead of the amount it was insured for, were it not for the post master volunteering
            Message 5 of 6 , Feb 6, 2004
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              Lindy,

              Fully agree, I wouldn't have even tried to collect full value, instead of the amount it was insured for, were it not for the post master volunteering his experience. So I gave it a try.

              But if the airline loses your bag, and it was insured for $200, they wouldn't ask you to prove it was worth that. And if you only insured it for $200, but lost your $1000 lap top in it, you might sue for a higher amount than the amount insured. And in many cases you'd win, because those are the actual damages caused by their negligence.

              Might have done a poor job explaining, but I see a clear difference in the rules USPS operate under, when compared to non-governmental industry.

              O
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