Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Connecticut Quarter

Expand Messages
  • corkysr
    Have just found a Connecticut Quarter that seems to have a filled collar die error. Reeding is very small. I have read that filled die errors are somewhat
    Message 1 of 2 , Sep 9, 2003
    • 0 Attachment
      Have just found a Connecticut Quarter that seems to have a filled
      collar die error. Reeding is very small. I have read that filled die
      errors are somewhat common. Remainder of coin seems to be as it
      should. Is this type of filled die error common?

      Thanks

      Corky
    • Mike Diamond
      Filled collar errors are actually very rare, although weak reeding isn t. Weak reeding may be due to a slightly weak strike, a little bit of die tilt, or for
      Message 2 of 2 , Sep 9, 2003
      • 0 Attachment
        Filled collar errors are actually very rare, although weak reeding
        isn't. Weak reeding may be due to a slightly weak strike, a little
        bit of die tilt, or for reasons that aren't readily apparent.

        Filled collar errors are uncommon because any crud that gets lodged
        in the ridges on the working face of the collar tends to be pushed
        out every time a tightly fitting, newly struck coin is ejected.

        A true filled collar error will have the following characteristics:

        1. The diameter of the coin will be smaller than normal when measured
        between where the reeding is weak and the opposite pole. That's
        because the crud will be even with the tips of the ridges on the
        working face of the collar, which is equivalent to the floor of the
        grooves on the coin. The diameter would be similar to a coin in
        which the reeding in one spot was ground off to the level of the
        floor of the grooves. So that would shave off a significant fraction
        of a millimeter.

        2. The rim should be very strongly struck -- or even finned -- next
        to where the reeding is weak. That's because the metal is prevented
        from expanding laterally during the strike. It has nowhere to go
        except up into the rim gutter.

        3. The weak or absent reeding should come to a relatively abrupt stop
        where it meets normal reeding. If there is a gradual fade-out of
        reeding then it's probably not a filled collar.

        I actually don't have a single bona fide example of a filled collar
        in my collection. I have lots of examples of weak or absent reeding,
        but they owe their existence to other causes -- some known and some
        unknown.

        -- Mike Diamond


        --- In errorcoininformationexchange@yahoogroups.com, "corkysr"
        <corkysr@a...> wrote:
        > Have just found a Connecticut Quarter that seems to have a filled
        > collar die error. Reeding is very small. I have read that filled
        die
        > errors are somewhat common. Remainder of coin seems to be as it
        > should. Is this type of filled die error common?
        >
        > Thanks
        >
        > Corky
      Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.