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Re: interesting strike-thru

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  • rjpike2000
    I won this nickel and it looks like the strike thru wraps around the edge (but not the reverse). Could this indicate that the obverse die was the anvil die?
    Message 1 of 8 , May 10 9:23 AM
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      I won this nickel and it looks like the strike thru wraps
      around the edge (but not the reverse). Could this indicate
      that the obverse die was the anvil die? Otherwise, how
      would the strike thru get caught between the collar and edge?

      Images of the obverse and edge are here:

      http://mywebpages.comcast.net/rpike1/NickelObverse.jpg

      http://mywebpages.comcast.net/rpike1/NickelEdge.jpg

      Thanks,
      Russ

      --- In errorcoininformationexchange@yahoogroups.com, "Mike Diamond"
      <mdia1@a...> wrote:
      > Check out this nickel:
      >
      > http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&item=3021240545
      >
      > I'd wager that it was struck through a thin, split planchet. Or
      > perhaps a very large lamination peel. Either way, it's an unusual
      > error.
    • Rafael Delgado
      Could this be a lamination peel caused by an incomplete punch at the blank producing stage? Rafael ... http://mywebpages.comcast.net/rpike1/NickelObverse.jpg
      Message 2 of 8 , May 10 12:34 PM
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        Could this be a lamination peel caused by an
        incomplete punch at the blank producing stage?
        Rafael
        --- rjpike2000 <no_reply@yahoogroups.com> wrote:
        > I won this nickel and it looks like the strike thru
        > wraps
        > around the edge (but not the reverse). Could this
        > indicate
        > that the obverse die was the anvil die? Otherwise,
        > how
        > would the strike thru get caught between the collar
        > and edge?
        >
        > Images of the obverse and edge are here:
        >
        >
        http://mywebpages.comcast.net/rpike1/NickelObverse.jpg
        >
        > http://mywebpages.comcast.net/rpike1/NickelEdge.jpg
        >
        > Thanks,
        > Russ
        >
        > --- In errorcoininformationexchange@yahoogroups.com,
        > "Mike Diamond"
        > <mdia1@a...> wrote:
        > > Check out this nickel:
        > >
        > >
        >
        http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&item=3021240545
        > >
        > > I'd wager that it was struck through a thin, split
        > planchet. Or
        > > perhaps a very large lamination peel. Either way,
        > it's an unusual
        > > error.
        >
        >


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      • Mike Diamond
        Wierd. It s possible that the item that the coin was struck through was somehow rolled into the edge of the coin during the upsetting process. Or perhaps it
        Message 3 of 8 , May 10 1:24 PM
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          Wierd. It's possible that the item that the coin was struck through
          was somehow rolled into the edge of the coin during the upsetting
          process. Or perhaps it was folded over onto the edge during the
          planchet's passage through the feeder tube.

          I don't recall many strike-thrus that continue over onto the edge. I
          have to hedge my bets on what this item was. I don't really know if
          it was a large lamination peel. The area of the strike-thru seems to
          show the impressions of striations, which would lend some weight to
          the idea that this was what it was.

          --- In errorcoininformationexchange@yahoogroups.com, rjpike2000
          <no_reply@y...> wrote:
          > I won this nickel and it looks like the strike thru wraps
          > around the edge (but not the reverse). Could this indicate
          > that the obverse die was the anvil die? Otherwise, how
          > would the strike thru get caught between the collar and edge?
          >
          > Images of the obverse and edge are here:
          >
          > http://mywebpages.comcast.net/rpike1/NickelObverse.jpg
          >
          > http://mywebpages.comcast.net/rpike1/NickelEdge.jpg
          >
          > Thanks,
          > Russ
          >
        • Mike Diamond
          The coin wouldn t have been struck with inverted dies. It s from 1989, which is three years before the first documented example of inverted dies among
          Message 4 of 8 , May 10 1:27 PM
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            The coin wouldn't have been struck with inverted dies. It's from
            1989, which is three years before the first documented example of
            inverted dies among modern-era US coins.

            --- In errorcoininformationexchange@yahoogroups.com, rjpike2000
            <no_reply@y...> wrote:
            > I won this nickel and it looks like the strike thru wraps
            > around the edge (but not the reverse). Could this indicate
            > that the obverse die was the anvil die? Otherwise, how
            > would the strike thru get caught between the collar and edge?
            >
            > Images of the obverse and edge are here:
            >
            > http://mywebpages.comcast.net/rpike1/NickelObverse.jpg
            >
            > http://mywebpages.comcast.net/rpike1/NickelEdge.jpg
            >
            > Thanks,
            > Russ
            >
            > --- In errorcoininformationexchange@yahoogroups.com, "Mike Diamond"
            > <mdia1@a...> wrote:
            > > Check out this nickel:
            > >
            > > http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&item=3021240545
            > >
            > > I'd wager that it was struck through a thin, split planchet. Or
            > > perhaps a very large lamination peel. Either way, it's an
            unusual
            > > error.
          • Mike Diamond
            An incomplete punch would show up on both faces. This does not look like a split-after-strike lamination peel. The ridges in the struck-thru area are too soft
            Message 5 of 8 , May 10 1:29 PM
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              An incomplete punch would show up on both faces.

              This does not look like a split-after-strike lamination peel. The
              ridges in the struck-thru area are too soft and muted for that, in my
              opinion. I also don't see any striations on the edge.

              --- In errorcoininformationexchange@yahoogroups.com, Rafael Delgado
              <my_errors@y...> wrote:
              > Could this be a lamination peel caused by an
              > incomplete punch at the blank producing stage?
              > Rafael
            • rjpike2000
              Wouldn t that be the simplest explanation though?
              Message 6 of 8 , May 10 6:57 PM
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                Wouldn't that be the simplest explanation though?

                --- In errorcoininformationexchange@yahoogroups.com, "Mike Diamond"
                <mdia1@a...> wrote:
                > The coin wouldn't have been struck with inverted dies. It's from
                > 1989, which is three years before the first documented example of
                > inverted dies among modern-era US coins.
                >
                > --- In errorcoininformationexchange@yahoogroups.com, rjpike2000
                > <no_reply@y...> wrote:
                > > I won this nickel and it looks like the strike thru wraps
                > > around the edge (but not the reverse). Could this indicate
                > > that the obverse die was the anvil die? Otherwise, how
                > > would the strike thru get caught between the collar and edge?
                > >
                > > Images of the obverse and edge are here:
                > >
                > > http://mywebpages.comcast.net/rpike1/NickelObverse.jpg
                > >
                > > http://mywebpages.comcast.net/rpike1/NickelEdge.jpg
                > >
                > > Thanks,
                > > Russ
                > >
                > > --- In errorcoininformationexchange@yahoogroups.com, "Mike Diamond"
                > > <mdia1@a...> wrote:
                > > > Check out this nickel:
                > > >
                > > > http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&item=3021240545
                > > >
                > > > I'd wager that it was struck through a thin, split planchet. Or
                > > > perhaps a very large lamination peel. Either way, it's an
                > unusual
                > > > error.
              • Mike Diamond
                It s a straightforward explanation, but I can t accept it as a possibility until such time as someone presents convincing evidence that inverted dies were in
                Message 7 of 8 , May 11 5:39 AM
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                  It's a straightforward explanation, but I can't accept it as a
                  possibility until such time as someone presents convincing evidence
                  that inverted dies were in use this early. I'd need to see a coin
                  dated 1989 or earlier with, say, a reversed partial collar or an off-
                  center strike featuring a collar scar on the obverse.

                  --- In errorcoininformationexchange@yahoogroups.com, rjpike2000
                  <no_reply@y...> wrote:
                  > Wouldn't that be the simplest explanation though?
                  >
                  > --- In errorcoininformationexchange@yahoogroups.com, "Mike Diamond"
                  > <mdia1@a...> wrote:
                  > > The coin wouldn't have been struck with inverted dies. It's from
                  > > 1989, which is three years before the first documented example of
                  > > inverted dies among modern-era US coins.
                  > >
                  > > --- In errorcoininformationexchange@yahoogroups.com, rjpike2000
                  > > <no_reply@y...> wrote:
                  > > > I won this nickel and it looks like the strike thru wraps
                  > > > around the edge (but not the reverse). Could this indicate
                  > > > that the obverse die was the anvil die? Otherwise, how
                  > > > would the strike thru get caught between the collar and edge?
                  > > >
                  > > > Images of the obverse and edge are here:
                  > > >
                  > > > http://mywebpages.comcast.net/rpike1/NickelObverse.jpg
                  > > >
                  > > > http://mywebpages.comcast.net/rpike1/NickelEdge.jpg
                  > > >
                  > > > Thanks,
                  > > > Russ
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