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2008 D dime

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  • gandara58
    Hi, I know I m not welcome here to be posting. But the lettering and the bottom of the torch it s missing. The two images. And the right tree branch the
    Message 1 of 6 , Mar 25, 2014
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    Hi, I know I'm not welcome  here to be posting. But the lettering and the bottom of the torch it's missing. The two images. And the right tree branch the bottom it's missing. I've been reading looking for the something similar, well now if I'm wrong with this one. I won't be back. And I know some of you will be happy with that.  This is my last post. If this ends up being a worn coin.  

    If you take a look at "in good we trust" the "date" and the edge of the coin on the obverse. 

    On the reverse side. In the word "UNITED" the "D" has a slight partial at the top. The word "STATES" both "S's","T", and "A", seem there not a full lettering? At the bottom of the torch it's missing the two images as well. And the word " E PLURIBUS  UNUM the " P" might be DD,

    ONE OF THE DOTS between the S and the U looks like a "-" and the two dots next to the word "One Dime" and at the bottom of the branch right side It's missing. 
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  • fred_weinberg
    Your coin isn t a worn coin, but is struck from minor filled dies, and probably from overused/worn dies. Coin production is a manufacturing process. There are
    Message 2 of 6 , Mar 25, 2014
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      Your coin isn't a worn coin, but is struck
      from minor filled dies, and probably from
      overused/worn dies.

      Coin production is a manufacturing process.
      There are bound to be very minor anomalies
      when tens of thousands of metal objects are
      struck in rapid order, and machine grease or
      other material finds itself into the dies.

      If the filled die area is significant, the coin can
      have some premium value, but this particular
      dime would be, in my opinion, 'as struck', and
      not be considered an error coin.

      You're looking closely, which is good, but the
      anomalies you're finding with a glass are just
      normal wear and tear of making metal discs
      at the rate of 500 or 600 pcs.in a minute.

      Just because a coin looks a bit different doesn't
      mean it's an error coin - but that's the way to
      learn - looking and learning about what you see.

      As a suggestion, I'd say if you're using a glass
      that's more than 10X or 12X, you'll almost always
      finding something that looks 'different'.

      Hope this helps a little bit.

      Fred

    • mpara5521
      I m no expert, and I hate to be the one to break it to you, but the missing elements you are point out just seem like circulation wear to me. I know it can be
      Message 3 of 6 , Mar 25, 2014
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        I'm no expert, and I hate to be the one to break it to you, but the missing elements you are point out just seem like circulation wear to me.


        I know it can be frustrating, and I haven't been doing this for very long, but I think you are giving up too easily.  You should really stick around and read and listen and learn as much as you can.


        There are some really interesting reads at the following link:  http://error-ref.com/  If you haven't read through all of the pages there, you should.  The one thing that I think would be helpful for me anyway is some kind of reference to what is considered a valuable find.  I have the latest edition of the Cherry Pickers Guide (Vol 1 &2) and the latest edition of the Red Book which has a little chart showing the going rate for major mint errors.  And I know just from reading different articles and posts that machine doubling, deterioration doubling, minor die chips, etc. are not considered valuable by collectors.  What would be cool is if each of the pages at http://error-ref.com/ would say "this type of error is (or is not) considered valuable".


        I recently went through an entire new box of nickels.  Two thousand 2013-P Jefferson Nickels.  I looked at every one under a microscope.  I identified every different die pairing in that box and sorted all of them by their die pairings.  That was an amazing experience, although I don't think I'll be doing that again for a while.  But I learned a lot.  I could tell by comparing several coins from the same die pairing what differences there were between coins struck by the same dies.  I was able to recognize a type of machine doubling that I have never even seen pictures of before.  I'll post some tonight when I get home.  It was very intriguing.  After all of that, I didn't even find a single coin that I knew was worth more than 5 cents.


        I'll probably pick up another box of nickels this week but I don't think I will look at it as closely.


        My point is, don't be discouraged.  And don't let yourself get frustrated.  This is a hobby that people do for enjoyment, not to get rich.  So enjoy yourself.

      • mpara5521
        I stand corrected. Pay no attention to me, I m a novice. :D
        Message 4 of 6 , Mar 25, 2014
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          I stand corrected.  Pay no attention to me, I'm a novice.  :D
        • mpara5521
          Here are those pictures by the way. I know this is some form of strike doubling but I have never seen it like this before. I looked at http://error-ref.com/
          Message 5 of 6 , Mar 25, 2014

          Here are those pictures by the way.  I know this is some form of strike doubling but I have never seen it like this before.  I looked at http://error-ref.com/ but I didn't see any types of strike doubling that resembled this.  Any ideas?

        • gandara58
          Yes it did. Thank you.
          Message 6 of 6 , Mar 25, 2014
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            Yes it did. Thank you. 
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