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1928 Lincoln

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  • gandara58
    What would be called?
    Message 1 of 4 , Jan 30, 2014
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    What would be called? 
  • theocean1ataol
    If I might be so bold as to suggest that this isn t the best way to learn about error coins. Buying a book, or going online to websites is a better place to
    Message 2 of 4 , Jan 30, 2014
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      If I might be so bold as to suggest that this isn't the best way to learn about error coins.
      Buying a book, or going online to websites is a better place to start.
       
      You'll be surprised how quickly you'll gain a working knowledge, and then turn to our group for more insight.
       
      By reading a book first, you are likely to find an area that interests you more so than just general errors. In my case, that's off metal Lincoln cents.
       
      What you are trying to gain is a foundation of basic knowledge, which would take you years to gain the way you are trying currently. When you send a photo of post strike damage (something happened to the coin after it left the mint), and we explain you simply have a damaged coin worth only face value - that might satisfy your curiosity about that one coin, but you gain no more understanding about the minting process, and all the other fun stuff associated with our niche area of numismatics.
       
      Starting with the book first will save you the trouble of scanning a bunch of damaged coins, and get you on the fast track of really learning about errors!  

      Bill
       
      In a message dated 1/30/2014 4:41:52 P.M. Eastern Standard Time, mdia1@... writes:
       

      Your 1928 cent appears to have a lamination crack extending down from the E of E PLURIBUS.  I can't discern what the other arrows might be pointing to.  Lamination cracks are common and are devoid of value.
       
      In a message dated 1/30/2014 2:11:08 P.M. Central Standard Time, gandara58@... writes:
       

      What would be called? 

    • dermestid
      I agree with you. Unfortunately, all of the standard references are out-of-print. I did direct gandara to _www.error-ref.com_ (http://www.error-ref.com) ,
      Message 3 of 4 , Jan 30, 2014
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        I agree with you.  Unfortunately, all of the standard references are out-of-print.  I did direct gandara to www.error-ref.com, but I don't know if he's delved deeply into its contents.  I have been trying to interest some publishers in a new, encyclopedic reference, but I've made no headway so far.
         
        In a message dated 1/30/2014 4:00:27 P.M. Central Standard Time, TheOcean1@... writes:
         

        If I might be so bold as to suggest that this isn't the best way to learn about error coins.
        Buying a book, or going online to websites is a better place to start.
         
        You'll be surprised how quickly you'll gain a working knowledge, and then turn to our group for more insight.
         
        By reading a book first, you are likely to find an area that interests you more so than just general errors. In my case, that's off metal Lincoln cents.
         
        What you are trying to gain is a foundation of basic knowledge, which would take you years to gain the way you are trying currently. When you send a photo of post strike damage (something happened to the coin after it left the mint), and we explain you simply have a damaged coin worth only face value - that might satisfy your curiosity about that one coin, but you gain no more understanding about the minting process, and all the other fun stuff associated with our niche area of numismatics.
         
        Starting with the book first will save you the trouble of scanning a bunch of damaged coins, and get you on the fast track of really learning about errors!  

        Bill
         
        In a message dated 1/30/2014 4:41:52 P.M. Eastern Standard Time, mdia1@... writes:
         

        Your 1928 cent appears to have a lamination crack extending down from the E of E PLURIBUS.  I can't discern what the other arrows might be pointing to.  Lamination cracks are common and are devoid of value.
         
        In a message dated 1/30/2014 2:11:08 P.M. Central Standard Time, gandara58@... writes:
         

        What would be called? 

      • Art G
        On thanks for the heads up I understand. I m about half way in the info. About the errors. Web site. I even bought the book. Reading both. Don t want to miss
        Message 4 of 4 , Feb 1, 2014
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          On thanks for the heads up I understand. 
          I'm about half way in the info. About the errors. Web site. I even bought the book. Reading both. Don't want to miss anything. Thanks again 
          Sent from my iPhone

          On Jan 30, 2014, at 2:21 PM, mdia1@... wrote:

           

          I agree with you.  Unfortunately, all of the standard references are out-of-print.  I did direct gandara to www.error-ref.com, but I don't know if he's delved deeply into its contents.  I have been trying to interest some publishers in a new, encyclopedic reference, but I've made no headway so far.
           
          In a message dated 1/30/2014 4:00:27 P.M. Central Standard Time, TheOcean1@... writes:
           

          If I might be so bold as to suggest that this isn't the best way to learn about error coins.
          Buying a book, or going online to websites is a better place to start.
           
          You'll be surprised how quickly you'll gain a working knowledge, and then turn to our group for more insight.
           
          By reading a book first, you are likely to find an area that interests you more so than just general errors. In my case, that's off metal Lincoln cents.
           
          What you are trying to gain is a foundation of basic knowledge, which would take you years to gain the way you are trying currently. When you send a photo of post strike damage (something happened to the coin after it left the mint), and we explain you simply have a damaged coin worth only face value - that might satisfy your curiosity about that one coin, but you gain no more understanding about the minting process, and all the other fun stuff associated with our niche area of numismatics.
           
          Starting with the book first will save you the trouble of scanning a bunch of damaged coins, and get you on the fast track of really learning about errors!  

          Bill
           
          In a message dated 1/30/2014 4:41:52 P.M. Eastern Standard Time, mdia1@... writes:
           

          Your 1928 cent appears to have a lamination crack extending down from the E of E PLURIBUS.  I can't discern what the other arrows might be pointing to.  Lamination cracks are common and are devoid of value.
           
          In a message dated 1/30/2014 2:11:08 P.M. Central Standard Time, gandara58@... writes:
           

          What would be called? 

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