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Suspect double denomination error

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  • dermestid
    Anybody else besides me have reservations about this 5c/10c double denomination error? http://www.ebay.com/itm/151162456353 It s certainly possible for a dime
    Message 1 of 5 , Nov 10, 2013
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      Anybody else besides me have reservations about this 5c/10c double denomination error?


      http://www.ebay.com/itm/151162456353

      It's certainly possible for a dime to receive an unusually weak strike provided the minimum die clearance is greater than normal.  But what bothers me is the discrepancy between the strength of the peripheral nickel letters and the weakness of the central design.  I would also have expected the field portion of the nickel dies to more strongly flatten the dime design.
    • dermestid
      I just noticed another clue. The dime was struck in Denver while the nickel was struck in Philadelphia. This is exceedingly unlikely, although not
      Message 2 of 5 , Nov 10, 2013
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        I just noticed another clue.  The dime was struck in Denver while the nickel was struck in Philadelphia.  This is exceedingly unlikely, although not impossible.
         
        In a message dated 11/10/2013 7:44:40 A.M. Central Standard Time, mdia1@... writes:
         

        Anybody else besides me have reservations about this 5c/10c double denomination error?


        http://www.ebay.com/itm/151162456353

        It's certainly possible for a dime to receive an unusually weak strike provided the minimum die clearance is greater than normal.  But what bothers me is the discrepancy between the strength of the peripheral nickel letters and the weakness of the central design.  I would also have expected the field portion of the nickel dies to more strongly flatten the dime design.

      • oldsubguru
        Is it possible that the nickel dies were concave? If that was the case then I would think it possible. But, how many cases have there been where a US coin
        Message 3 of 5 , Nov 10, 2013
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          Is it possible that the nickel dies were concave? If that was the case then I would think it possible. But, how many cases have there been where a US coin was struck with concave dies?
           
          Other than that, I have no clue as to how this dual denomination would occur.
           
          In a message dated 11/10/2013 8:47:19 A.M. Eastern Standard Time, mdia1@... writes:
           

          I just noticed another clue.  The dime was struck in Denver while the nickel was struck in Philadelphia.  This is exceedingly unlikely, although not impossible.
           
          In a message dated 11/10/2013 7:44:40 A.M. Central Standard Time, mdia1@... writes:
           

          Anybody else besides me have reservations about this 5c/10c double denomination error?


          http://www.ebay.com/itm/151162456353

          It's certainly possible for a dime to receive an unusually weak strike provided the minimum die clearance is greater than normal.  But what bothers me is the discrepancy between the strength of the peripheral nickel letters and the weakness of the central design.  I would also have expected the field portion of the nickel dies to more strongly flatten the dime design.

        • dermestid
          Nickel dies of this period are more convex than recent dies. So you would expect much greater flattening of the field given the strength of the peripheral
          Message 4 of 5 , Nov 10, 2013
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            Nickel dies of this period are more convex than recent dies.  So you would expect much greater flattening of the field given the strength of the peripheral letters.
             
            In a message dated 11/10/2013 7:57:57 A.M. Central Standard Time, innff@... writes:
             

            Is it possible that the nickel dies were concave? If that was the case then I would think it possible. But, how many cases have there been where a US coin was struck with concave dies?
             
            Other than that, I have no clue as to how this dual denomination would occur.
             
            In a message dated 11/10/2013 8:47:19 A.M. Eastern Standard Time, mdia1@... writes:
             

            I just noticed another clue.  The dime was struck in Denver while the nickel was struck in Philadelphia.  This is exceedingly unlikely, although not impossible.
             
            In a message dated 11/10/2013 7:44:40 A.M. Central Standard Time, mdia1@... writes:
             

            Anybody else besides me have reservations about this 5c/10c double denomination error?


            http://www.ebay.com/itm/151162456353

            It's certainly possible for a dime to receive an unusually weak strike provided the minimum die clearance is greater than normal.  But what bothers me is the discrepancy between the strength of the peripheral nickel letters and the weakness of the central design.  I would also have expected the field portion of the nickel dies to more strongly flatten the dime design.

          • dermestid
            It s certainly possible that a pair of counterfeit dies developed a concave cross-sectional profile. In a message dated 11/10/2013 8:00:13 A.M. Central
            Message 5 of 5 , Nov 10, 2013
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              It's certainly possible that a pair of counterfeit dies developed a concave cross-sectional profile.
               
              In a message dated 11/10/2013 8:00:13 A.M. Central Standard Time, mdia1@... writes:
               

              Nickel dies of this period are more convex than recent dies.  So you would expect much greater flattening of the field given the strength of the peripheral letters.
               
              In a message dated 11/10/2013 7:57:57 A.M. Central Standard Time, innff@... writes:
               

              Is it possible that the nickel dies were concave? If that was the case then I would think it possible. But, how many cases have there been where a US coin was struck with concave dies?
               
              Other than that, I have no clue as to how this dual denomination would occur.
               
              In a message dated 11/10/2013 8:47:19 A.M. Eastern Standard Time, mdia1@... writes:
               

              I just noticed another clue.  The dime was struck in Denver while the nickel was struck in Philadelphia.  This is exceedingly unlikely, although not impossible.
               
              In a message dated 11/10/2013 7:44:40 A.M. Central Standard Time, mdia1@... writes:
               

              Anybody else besides me have reservations about this 5c/10c double denomination error?


              http://www.ebay.com/itm/151162456353

              It's certainly possible for a dime to receive an unusually weak strike provided the minimum die clearance is greater than normal.  But what bothers me is the discrepancy between the strength of the peripheral nickel letters and the weakness of the central design.  I would also have expected the field portion of the nickel dies to more strongly flatten the dime design.

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