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Re: Another strange error that crossed my desk.

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  • Mike Diamond
    Here s a link to the public access version: http://www.coinworld.com/articles/printarticle/planchet-crack-with-odd-edges-leads-to-type-i
    Message 1 of 9 , Aug 17, 2013
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      Here's a link to the public access version:

      http://www.coinworld.com/articles/printarticle/planchet-crack-with-odd-edges-leads-to-type-i

      --- In errorcoininformationexchange@yahoogroups.com, "Mike Diamond" <mdia1@...> wrote:
      >
      > My analysis of Matt's off-center dime with a Type III stutter strike is in this week's Coin World. I'll let you know when the public access version comes out (usually on Sunday afternoon).
      >
      > --- In errorcoininformationexchange@yahoogroups.com, "Mike Diamond" <mdia1@> wrote:
      > >
      > > Until this o/c dime showed up, I had always assumed that any stutter strike would involve the hammer die's design. That's certainly true of Type I and Type II and I don't expect that to change. But I hadn't anticipated the unique circumstances that led to the appearance of a stutter strike on the reverse face of Matt's dime.
      > >
      > > I'll have to amend the definition of a Type III stutter strike on error-ref.com.
      > >
      > > --- In errorcoininformationexchange@yahoogroups.com, "Mike Diamond" <mdia1@> wrote:
      > > >
      > > > I do have a Mexico 20 centavos struck on a planchet with a deep fissure. The edges are telescoped where the coin protruded beyond the striking chamber. I suppose this telescoping can happen during upsetting as well as other points in the coin's progression through the production stream. So there is a precedent for the proposed shape of the dime planchet prior to the strike. The 20 centavos does not have a stutter strike, however.
      > > >
      > > > --- In errorcoininformationexchange@yahoogroups.com, "Mike Diamond" <mdia1@> wrote:
      > > > >
      > > > > To be more specific, the edge of the obverse die more-or-less coincided with the tear in the coin, and the tear coincided with the edge of the striking chamber. When the hammer die contacted the top side of the telescoped edges, it generated some die-struck design on the reverse face. As it continued its descent, it forced the edges apart (and into aligment in the horizontal plane), and pushed the design on the reverse face out beyond the limits of the striking chamber. This preserved these elements as the hammer die completed its downstroke.
      > > > >
      > > > > So this error really depended on a concatenation of fortunate events.
      > > > >
      > > > > --- In errorcoininformationexchange@yahoogroups.com, "Mike Diamond" <mdia1@> wrote:
      > > > > >
      > > > > > I now have the dime in front of me. It appears that the split on the left side was not caused by the strike but was present before the strike. One clue is that the obverse clad layer has been smeared onto the exposed core within the split. This would not be the case had the split been caused by tensile forces generated within the strike.
      > > > > >
      > > > > > I suspect that at the site of the split the upper portion of the of the planchet was initially slightly telescoped over the lower portion. When the hammer die contacted this area of overlap, it generated a Type III stutter strike on the reverse face. The main strike was generated during the later stages of the hammer die's desecent.
      > > > > >
      > > > > > --- In errorcoininformationexchange@yahoogroups.com, "Mike Diamond" <mdia1@> wrote:
      > > > > > >
      > > > > > > This is indeed an interesting specimen. I agree that there is some post-strike damage. For the damage that occurs in the unstruck portion of the coin, there's no way to determine if it's pre-strike or post-strike. The coin seems to have split on the left side during the main off-center strike. There is an additional strike clearly visible on the reverse. It almost certainly was generated before the main off-center strike. What I'd like to know is if this strike lies a significant distance beyond the internal margin of the slide zone of the main strike. If it does, so that it's only opposed on the opposite face by an unstruck surface, then this may be a Type III stutter strike. That's a very rare striking error that occurs when a bent planchet or coin enters the striking chamber.
      > > > > > >
      > > > > > > If it's possible, I'd like to examine it up close. You have my home address.
      > > > > > >
      > > > > > > --- In errorcoininformationexchange@yahoogroups.com, "matt_dinger1793" <matt@> wrote:
      > > > > > > >
      > > > > > > > Hi gang!
      > > > > > > >
      > > > > > > > I have uploaded a picture of a dime I have come across. I'd like to hear some preliminary thoughts on it. The coin looks to have spent a little time stuck in a coin counter on the obverse.. but what do you make of the line on the reverse? Also it appears to be multiply struck as well.
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