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Re: 1971-D nickel struck on odd, possibly clad planchet

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  • Mike Diamond
    As I mentioned in a previous post, none of the copper-colored edge is hidden by cladding dragged over from the bottom face of the blank. The copper-colored
    Message 1 of 10 , Jul 28, 2013
      As I mentioned in a previous post, none of the copper-colored edge is hidden by cladding dragged over from the bottom face of the blank. The copper-colored edge does have flecks of nickel-colored metal.

      This appearance is easily attributed to the rolling and squeezing the blank was subjected to. When ordinary dimes are rolled and squeezed you generally end up with an all-copper edge.

      --- In errorcoininformationexchange@yahoogroups.com, "Mike Diamond" <mdia1@...> wrote:
      >
      > I finally cracked this coin out of its NGC slab. I've learned never to trust weights printed on slab labels. However, in this case the printed weight matches the actual weight. The weight on the slab is 3.2 grams and on my analytical balance it comes out to 3.18 grams.
      >
      > This matches the expected weight of a nickel struck on clad dime stock (3.19 grams). However, I suspect that the coin was originally heavier, since a considerable amount of surface metal is missing.
      >
      > It's certainly possible that the precise match-up with dime stock is purely coincidental. Still, the appearance of the coin is consistent with some sort of clad composition. Wherever the surface cladding is disrupted, you only see red, grainy metal, which is presumably copper.
      >
      > If this nickel blank was truly struck on dime stock, it certainly went through the ringer afterward. The grainy, red metal strongly suggests it was subjected to excessive heat in the annealing oven. The blank was rolled and squeezed as well. I suspect the edge damage followed upon the annealing damage, because in many places the thin apron generated by the squeezing covers over the exposed red metal.
      >
      > It's also possible that the original blank was wider than a nickel blank. Despite being rolled and squeezed so that considerable metal was displaced from the edge, the coin shows collar contact all around. It's unexpected for a blank squeezed to a smaller-than-normal diameter to fully expand afterward when struck. However, it's not impossible, given that the strike was strong.
      >
      > I still plan on sending the coin to John Lorenzo for x-ray flourescence analysis of the nickel-colored and copper-colored areas.
      >
      > --- In errorcoininformationexchange@yahoogroups.com, "Mike Diamond" <mdia1@> wrote:
      > >
      > > I first saw this nickel on eBay somewhere around the year 2000 when it sold for $1500:
      > >
      > > http://www.ebay.com/itm/400521187761
      > >
      > > It has always puzzled me, so much so that I bought it today for a surprisingly low price.
      > >
      > > The weight seems in line with clad dime stock, but its appearance is so odd as to leave that diagnosis in question. The copper-nickel surface is interrupted on the obverse, exposing rusty-red metal. The red color and a fine grainness reminds me of some improper annealing errors, but the pattern of exposure and overall general appearance of the coin is not what I associate with conventional improper annealing errors. The edge of the planchet was rolled and squeezed before the strike, generating a thin apron of metal that was struck into both faces.
      > >
      > > I may crack it out and submit it for XRF analysis. I'm especiallly interested to see if the exposed copper core on the edge is truly 100% copper.
      > >
      > > In the end, I doubt I'll get to the bottom of this mystery, but I may be able to eliminate some possibilities. I'll certainly write it up at some point for Coin World.
      > >
      > > I suspect some bidders stayed away because of its odd appearance. If this had been unambigous clad dime stock, it would presumably been at least as desirable as the 1987-P nickels on clad quarter stock. In my experience, most collectors like diagnostic certainty instead of impenetrable mystery.
      > >
      >
    • dermestid
      The column devoted to this coin is in this week s Coin World. I ll let you know if and when the public domain version is released. ... I finally cracked this
      Message 2 of 10 , Sep 9, 2013

         The column devoted to this coin is in this week's Coin World.  I'll let you know if and when the public domain version is released.



        --- In errorcoininformationexchange@yahoogroups.com, <errorcoininformationexchange@yahoogroups.com> wrote:

        I finally cracked this coin out of its NGC slab. I've learned never to trust weights printed on slab labels. However, in this case the printed weight matches the actual weight. The weight on the slab is 3.2 grams and on my analytical balance it comes out to 3.18 grams.

        This matches the expected weight of a nickel struck on clad dime stock (3.19 grams). However, I suspect that the coin was originally heavier, since a considerable amount of surface metal is missing.

        It's certainly possible that the precise match-up with dime stock is purely coincidental. Still, the appearance of the coin is consistent with some sort of clad composition. Wherever the surface cladding is disrupted, you only see red, grainy metal, which is presumably copper.

        If this nickel blank was truly struck on dime stock, it certainly went through the ringer afterward. The grainy, red metal strongly suggests it was subjected to excessive heat in the annealing oven. The blank was rolled and squeezed as well. I suspect the edge damage followed upon the annealing damage, because in many places the thin apron generated by the squeezing covers over the exposed red metal.

        It's also possible that the original blank was wider than a nickel blank. Despite being rolled and squeezed so that considerable metal was displaced from the edge, the coin shows collar contact all around. It's unexpected for a blank squeezed to a smaller-than-normal diameter to fully expand afterward when struck. However, it's not impossible, given that the strike was strong.

        I still plan on sending the coin to John Lorenzo for x-ray flourescence analysis of the nickel-colored and copper-colored areas.

        --- In errorcoininformationexchange@yahoogroups.com, "Mike Diamond" <mdia1@...> wrote:
        >
        > I first saw this nickel on eBay somewhere around the year 2000 when it sold for $1500:
        >
        > http://www.ebay.com/itm/400521187761
        >
        > It has always puzzled me, so much so that I bought it today for a surprisingly low price.
        >
        > The weight seems in line with clad dime stock, but its appearance is so odd as to leave that diagnosis in question. The copper-nickel surface is interrupted on the obverse, exposing rusty-red metal. The red color and a fine grainness reminds me of some improper annealing errors, but the pattern of exposure and overall general appearance of the coin is not what I associate with conventional improper annealing errors. The edge of the planchet was rolled and squeezed before the strike, generating a thin apron of metal that was struck into both faces.
        >
        > I may crack it out and submit it for XRF analysis. I'm especiallly interested to see if the exposed copper core on the edge is truly 100% copper.
        >
        > In the end, I doubt I'll get to the bottom of this mystery, but I may be able to eliminate some possibilities. I'll certainly write it up at some point for Coin World.
        >
        > I suspect some bidders stayed away because of its odd appearance. If this had been unambigous clad dime stock, it would presumably been at least as desirable as the 1987-P nickels on clad quarter stock. In my experience, most collectors like diagnostic certainty instead of impenetrable mystery.
        >
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