Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Re: Can anyone help me identify this odd looking nickel?

Expand Messages
  • Mike Diamond
    I haven t seen this design before. I don t think there s any possibility that it s a mint product, though. The ugly portrait of Jefferson would certainly
    Message 1 of 5 , Jun 26, 2013
    • 0 Attachment
      I haven't seen this design before. I don't think there's any possibility that it's a mint product, though. The ugly portrait of Jefferson would certainly never be acceptable to Mint officials.

      --- In errorcoininformationexchange@yahoogroups.com, "jdr_mcb" <jdr_mcb@...> wrote:
      >
      > I found this coin while sorting through a bulk foriegn coin lot I recently purchased in an online auction. It appears to be a 1938 U.S. Nickel with a different portrait of Thomas Jefferson facing left on the obverse and the reverse is similar to the original Monticello design , except for a few subtle changes including what appears to be smoke coming from the chimney and an outline of the state of Virginia added below the steps..
      > It IS NOT stamped as a "COPY" on either side, it has a smooth plain edge without lettering and it appears to be in medal alignment instead of coin alignment. I know 1938 was a transitional year for the design but I have yet to find anything as to the origin of this odd looking nickel!!! Any input, thoughts, or ideas would be greatly appreciated by this novice newbie!!!
      >
    • fred_weinberg
      I think you re describing a private piece, minted to commemorate the Jeff. Nickel, or some other purpose..... I recall seeing these, similar to your
      Message 2 of 5 , Jun 26, 2013
      • 0 Attachment
        I think you're describing a private piece, minted
        to commemorate the Jeff. Nickel, or some other purpose.....


        I recall seeing these, similar to your descripton, about
        5-6-7 years ago, maybe longer........they are private issues.


        Fred


        --- In errorcoininformationexchange@yahoogroups.com, "Mike Diamond" <mdia1@...> wrote:
        >
        > I haven't seen this design before. I don't think there's any possibility that it's a mint product, though. The ugly portrait of Jefferson would certainly never be acceptable to Mint officials.
        >
        > --- In errorcoininformationexchange@yahoogroups.com, "jdr_mcb" <jdr_mcb@> wrote:
        > >
        > > I found this coin while sorting through a bulk foriegn coin lot I recently purchased in an online auction. It appears to be a 1938 U.S. Nickel with a different portrait of Thomas Jefferson facing left on the obverse and the reverse is similar to the original Monticello design , except for a few subtle changes including what appears to be smoke coming from the chimney and an outline of the state of Virginia added below the steps..
        > > It IS NOT stamped as a "COPY" on either side, it has a smooth plain edge without lettering and it appears to be in medal alignment instead of coin alignment. I know 1938 was a transitional year for the design but I have yet to find anything as to the origin of this odd looking nickel!!! Any input, thoughts, or ideas would be greatly appreciated by this novice newbie!!!
        > >
        >
      • Travis
        It was designed by Frans Karel Hejda and submitted around 1938 in a design competition for the nickel but was rejected. The token is a more recently made
        Message 3 of 5 , Jun 26, 2013
        • 0 Attachment
          It was designed by Frans Karel Hejda and submitted around 1938 in a design competition for the nickel but was rejected. The token is a more recently made private strike. My understanding is that someone bought the original galvanos and used them to make dies that were then used to strike your token, presumably in a limited quantity.

          --- In errorcoininformationexchange@yahoogroups.com, "jdr_mcb" <jdr_mcb@...> wrote:
          >
          > I found this coin while sorting through a bulk foriegn coin lot I recently purchased in an online auction. It appears to be a 1938 U.S. Nickel with a different portrait of Thomas Jefferson facing left on the obverse and the reverse is similar to the original Monticello design , except for a few subtle changes including what appears to be smoke coming from the chimney and an outline of the state of Virginia added below the steps..
          > It IS NOT stamped as a "COPY" on either side, it has a smooth plain edge without lettering and it appears to be in medal alignment instead of coin alignment. I know 1938 was a transitional year for the design but I have yet to find anything as to the origin of this odd looking nickel!!! Any input, thoughts, or ideas would be greatly appreciated by this novice newbie!!!
          >
        • jdr_mcb
          ... Thanks for pointing me in the right direction guys!!! I was able to research it more once Travis was able to give me a name to work with. Apparently a
          Message 4 of 5 , Jul 1, 2013
          • 0 Attachment
            --- In errorcoininformationexchange@yahoogroups.com, "Travis" <travisbolton543@...> wrote:
            >
            > It was designed by Frans Karel Hejda and submitted around 1938 in a design competition for the nickel but was rejected. The token is a more recently made private strike. My understanding is that someone bought the original galvanos and used them to make dies that were then used to strike your token, presumably in a limited quantity.

            Thanks for pointing me in the right direction guys!!! I was able to research it more once Travis was able to give me a name to work with. Apparently a few of the original 390 plaster galvanos that were submitted to the mint for the contest to redesign the Buffalo Nickel in 1938 have been discovered intact and sold in various auctions over the years. From what I have gathered, the design of the pattern nickel I have in my collection was designed by Frans Karel Hejda and submitted to the mint for consideration in April of 1938. As most of you know, the winning design for what we know as the Jefferson Nickel, was submitted by Felix Schlag. Despite public outcry and protest concerning the decision made by tmint officials ,the Schlag galvanos were reportedly "revised" numerous times by the mint before they were reduced to working dies and production of the Jefferson Nickel began in late 1938. The plaster galvanos for the Fran's Karel Hejda Pattern Design were sold to an unknown individual at a Coin Galleries sale some 25 years ago (around 1988), who then had working dies made from them. From which, approx. 1938 coins were minted (actual mintage unknown) in .925 Sterling, to commemorate the 50th anniversary of the infamous Nickel Design Contest of 1938 and then, both the plaster galvanos AND the working dies were destroyed to preserve the limited mintage!!! I have only found one documented example of this coin for sale online.

            CLICK HERE--->http://coins.ha.com/c/item.zx?saleNo=267&lotNo=8420

            I would be VERY interested if anyone has one in their collection or knows of any that still exist!!!
            Any additional information about this unofficial pattern nickel would also be greatly appreciated!!!

            THANKS AGAIN GUYS!!!!
          Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.