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Re: I hate Western Digital external hard drives

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  • Mike Diamond
    I back up my hobby and work-related stuff onto CDs as well. After this fiasco, I m going to do it more often. Files belonging to my wife and daughter were
    Message 1 of 8 , Jun 9, 2013
      I back up my hobby and work-related stuff onto CDs as well. After this fiasco, I'm going to do it more often.

      Files belonging to my wife and daughter were backed up only on the external hard drive (and now currently reside on my wife's laptop). So while I haven't lost any files (to my knowledge), it's been a close call. Why Western Digital hasn't designed a setup to protect files from casual computer users is a mystery to me.

      I guess the next logical step is to get a dedicated external hard drive for each computer and not stick the USB connection into multiple computers, like a bee sucking nectar from several flowers.


      --- In errorcoininformationexchange@yahoogroups.com, jylitalo <no_reply@...> wrote:
      >
      > That is always scary.
      >
      > I have both a Seagate and a Western digital (externals).
      >
      > I know CD's are a pain in the keester to burn these days but about every 6 months I go thru the motions to back stuff up I've created onto them as well.
      >
      > Maybe I should trash can the WD I have...it's got to be 10 years old by now!
      >
      >
      > --- In errorcoininformationexchange@yahoogroups.com, "Mike Diamond" <mdia1@> wrote:
      > >
      > > After my computer power supply failed last Monday, I attempted to download the files I backed up on my external hard drive onto my wife's laptop. I managed to do so successfully, but only after I took both to a Geek Squad consultant at Best Buy. It took her 15 minutes to locate the file, which was located in a folder buried inside a folder buried inside a folder buried inside a folder. All these nested files had inscrutable names. A real Russian doll organization.
      > >
      > > After my old computer was back up and running, I hooked up my WD external hard drive and the WD software proceeded to overwrite all of my old files, destroying those I'd saved on the external hard drive but previously deleted from my internal hard drive to save space.
      > >
      > > I'm switching to Seagate in the hopes that it's more user-friendly and less destructive.
      > >
      >
    • Steven Mills
      Mike, I hope you are using CD generically and are actually using DVDs, as they hold 6 or 7 times the data and cost about the same. Anyway, if you are redoing
      Message 2 of 8 , Jun 9, 2013
        Mike,

        I hope you are using "CD" generically and are actually using DVDs, as they hold 6 or 7 times the data and cost about the same.

        Anyway, if you are redoing your backup system, you ought to consider a box attached to your network. Synology makes a fine 2 disk RAID box that sells for $200 and you can add 2 2 Tb drives for about the same. So for about $400 you have a fully redundant 2 tb system accessible to everyone on the network. Just plug it into your router. Installation is straight forward and everyone has their own folder for backup.

        The Synology software is OK, but I've never been a fan of included software. Something like the free Cobian software i think is preferable. Make an initial image using something like Driveimage XML or Acronis so you can do a bare meal restore and let Cobian or something similar handle the daily tasks. Refresh the image every 3-6 months.

        AND - the most important thing I tell my customers - make sure the backups are actually happening. They have a way of bombing out.

        Just some thoughts.

        Steve

        Sent from my iPad, so please excuse the inevitable glitches.

        On Jun 9, 2013, at 1:56 PM, "Mike Diamond" <mdia1@...> wrote:

         

        I back up my hobby and work-related stuff onto CDs as well. After this fiasco, I'm going to do it more often.

        Files belonging to my wife and daughter were backed up only on the external hard drive (and now currently reside on my wife's laptop). So while I haven't lost any files (to my knowledge), it's been a close call. Why Western Digital hasn't designed a setup to protect files from casual computer users is a mystery to me.

        I guess the next logical step is to get a dedicated external hard drive for each computer and not stick the USB connection into multiple computers, like a bee sucking nectar from several flowers.

        --- In errorcoininformationexchange@yahoogroups.com, jylitalo <no_reply@...> wrote:
        >
        > That is always scary.
        >
        > I have both a Seagate and a Western digital (externals).
        >
        > I know CD's are a pain in the keester to burn these days but about every 6 months I go thru the motions to back stuff up I've created onto them as well.

        > Maybe I should trash can the WD I have...it's got to be 10 years old by now!
        >
        >
        > --- In errorcoininformationexchange@yahoogroups.com, "Mike Diamond" <mdia1@> wrote:
        > >
        > > After my computer power supply failed last Monday, I attempted to download the files I backed up on my external hard drive onto my wife's laptop. I managed to do so successfully, but only after I took both to a Geek Squad consultant at Best Buy. It took her 15 minutes to locate the file, which was located in a folder buried inside a folder buried inside a folder buried inside a folder. All these nested files had inscrutable names. A real Russian doll organization.
        > >
        > > After my old computer was back up and running, I hooked up my WD external hard drive and the WD software proceeded to overwrite all of my old files, destroying those I'd saved on the external hard drive but previously deleted from my internal hard drive to save space.
        > >
        > > I'm switching to Seagate in the hopes that it's more user-friendly and less destructive.
        > >
        >

      • Howard Spindel
        That is scary, but the fault lies with WD software not the drives. WD drives are as robust any other manufacturer, in my experience. I don t use any backup
        Message 3 of 8 , Jun 9, 2013
          That is scary, but the fault lies with WD software not the drives.  WD drives are as robust any other manufacturer, in my experience.

          I don't use any backup software that comes with external drives.  I prefer more robust solutions. 

          Currently I have two Seagate 2TB USB drives.  I use Norton Ghost software to create backups.  I have a batch file that makes a duplicate copy of everything on the first external drive to the second external drive.  I also have two smaller USB drives (portable) to which I daily copy my most important files.  I rotate those two drives day to day.  When I leave the house, the most recent of the two leaves with me.

          Norton Ghost has been quite reliable in recovering files when I've needed it.  With two copies of backup files plus the smaller drive filled with the most essential files I would have to have multiple simultaneous failure before I lost anything of major importance.  The worst would be a house file while I'm away, and the disk I take away with me would protect against that.  In case of a fire while home, I'd grab one of the smaller drives on the way out of the house.

          In addition to all of this, all of the internal drives on my computer are RAID 1 mirrored, so when I lose a drive I pop in a new one and have no down time.  "When I lose a drive" is the correct phrasing - it's guaranteed I will lose drives.  Has happened to me multiple times. 

          Yes, this is all fairly paranoid.  But paranoia in backups is a good strategy.  Despite multiple system failures in 40 years of dealing with computers (30 of them professionally) I've lost work only once.  And that was on a mainframe where the mainframe backup operator screwed up.

          The cost of lots of storage is very cheap compared to the hassle and cost of recovering/restoring important data.  Be paranoid.

          Howard

          At 08:35 AM 6/9/2013, Mike Diamond wrote:
           

          After my computer power supply failed last Monday, I attempted to download the files I backed up on my external hard drive onto my wife's laptop. I managed to do so successfully, but only after I took both to a Geek Squad consultant at Best Buy. It took her 15 minutes to locate the file, which was located in a folder buried inside a folder buried inside a folder buried inside a folder. All these nested files had inscrutable names. A real Russian doll organization.

          After my old computer was back up and running, I hooked up my WD external hard drive and the WD software proceeded to overwrite all of my old files, destroying those I'd saved on the external hard drive but previously deleted from my internal hard drive to save space.

          I'm switching to Seagate in the hopes that it's more user-friendly and less destructive.


        • RHJ_Jr
          I don t use the soft ware that comes with the WD either. I back up photos once a month in a directory labeled as such. For instance I will have a directory
          Message 4 of 8 , Jun 10, 2013
            I don't use the soft ware that comes with the WD either.
            I back up photos once a month in a directory labeled as such. For instance I will have a directory for 2013 with 12 monthly subdirectories. I have been doing this for years, but is mostly for travel photos so it is easy to find what Im looking for.
            But buy away on the Seagate hard drives as I have some of their stock!
            Regards,
            Bob
          • Mike Diamond
            I didn t know I had the option of not using their software. I will certainly go that route. On a bright note, I found the missing files today on my WD
            Message 5 of 8 , Jun 10, 2013
              I didn't know I had the option of not using their software. I will certainly go that route.

              On a bright note, I found the missing files today on my WD external hard drive. They weren't there yesterday (as far as I could tell), but today they are. Finding my way through their layout is like negotiating the Minotaur's labyrinth.

              --- In errorcoininformationexchange@yahoogroups.com, RHJ_Jr <no_reply@...> wrote:
              >
              >
              >
              > I don't use the soft ware that comes with the WD either.
              > I back up photos once a month in a directory labeled as such. For instance I will have a directory for 2013 with 12 monthly subdirectories. I have been doing this for years, but is mostly for travel photos so it is easy to find what Im looking for.
              > But buy away on the Seagate hard drives as I have some of their stock!
              > Regards,
              > Bob
              >
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