Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.
 

Is this a Double struck half cent

Expand Messages
  • Doug Eckel Southern Calif.
    Hello, Any help would be great on this.  Would this be a double struck obv with a blockage on the reverse? Thanks Doug Hello, Any help would be great on this.
    Message 1 of 3 , Nov 27, 2012
    Hello,
    Any help would be great on this.  Would this be a double struck obv with a blockage on the reverse?
    Thanks
    Doug
  • Mike Diamond
    I see an extra mouth, chin, and neck on the obverse. If the extra profile was delivered by authentic dies, then this would be a double strike. But then the
    Message 2 of 3 , Nov 27, 2012
      I see an extra mouth, chin, and neck on the obverse. If the extra profile was delivered by authentic dies, then this would be a double strike. But then the question arises, which kind of double strike? There are three possibilities:

      1. A double strike in which the first strike was uniface on the reverse. Both coins would then have been removed from the press. The top coin would have been placed back into the press and struck again, leaving the obverse with two images and the reverse with one.

      2. A "one-sided" double strike with rotation of the obverse die between strikes. The incomplete bust would then be what's left of the first strike.

      3. A "one-sided" double strike with a rotation of the obverse die between strikes and with very weak second strike. The incomplete bust would then represent the second strike.

      The heavy wear probably prevents any secure determination of authenticity or etiology. I also don't know why the design is so uneven in its completeness. Is it due to uneven wear, an uneven (tilted) strike, or a tapered planchet? Hard to say with the evidence at hand.
      --- In errorcoininformationexchange@yahoogroups.com, "Doug Eckel Southern Calif." <scycads@...> wrote:
      >
      > Hello,
      > Any help would be great on this.  Would this be a double struck obv with a blockage on the reverse?
      > Thanks
      > Doug
      >
    • Doug Eckel Southern Calif.
      Thank you Mike for the clear info. I am thinking that the poor reverse is due to the pressure of the second strike with a blank planchet under the reverse. But
      Message 3 of 3 , Nov 28, 2012
        Thank you Mike for the clear info.
        I am thinking that the poor reverse is due to the pressure of the second strike with a blank planchet under the reverse. But this does not explain the uneven obliterating of the lower wreath.  I hand the reverse is almost like a die swelling and not so much wear maybe uneven pressure when stuck??.  There is one on ebay right now with almost the same rotation between strikes and while a much better coin it shows weakness on the lower wreath area also.  http://www.ebay.com/itm/1804-C-13-R1-Pl-4-w-out-Stems-Double-FACE-AND-DOUBLE-STRUCK-brockage-maker-DAVY-/290717317522?pt=Coins_US_Individual&hash=item43b01a3992
        Any further thoughts would be greatly appreciated.
        Thank you very much
        Doug

        --- On Tue, 11/27/12, Mike Diamond <mdia1@...> wrote:

        From: Mike Diamond <mdia1@...>
        Subject: [Error Coin Information Exchange] Re: Is this a Double struck half cent
        To: errorcoininformationexchange@yahoogroups.com
        Date: Tuesday, November 27, 2012, 8:26 PM

         

        I see an extra mouth, chin, and neck on the obverse. If the extra profile was delivered by authentic dies, then this would be a double strike. But then the question arises, which kind of double strike? There are three possibilities:

        1. A double strike in which the first strike was uniface on the reverse. Both coins would then have been removed from the press. The top coin would have been placed back into the press and struck again, leaving the obverse with two images and the reverse with one.

        2. A "one-sided" double strike with rotation of the obverse die between strikes. The incomplete bust would then be what's left of the first strike.

        3. A "one-sided" double strike with a rotation of the obverse die between strikes and with very weak second strike. The incomplete bust would then represent the second strike.

        The heavy wear probably prevents any secure determination of authenticity or etiology. I also don't know why the design is so uneven in its completeness. Is it due to uneven wear, an uneven (tilted) strike, or a tapered planchet? Hard to say with the evidence at hand.
        --- In errorcoininformationexchange@yahoogroups.com, "Doug Eckel Southern Calif." <scycads@...> wrote:
        >
        > Hello,
        > Any help would be great on this.  Would this be a double struck obv with a blockage on the reverse?
        > Thanks
        > Doug
        >

      Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.