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  • Wes <aihacker@yahoo.com>
    I am new to the group. I m amazed at how many coin errors there are, looking through the photos in this group. I ve only come across one coin error, but don t
    Message 1 of 5 , Feb 6, 2003
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      I am new to the group. I'm amazed at how many coin errors there are,
      looking through the photos in this group. I've only come across one
      coin error, but don't know how to find out how much it's worth. The
      coin is a dime. It doesn't appear to have any defects until you look
      at the edge, there is a groove that goes all the way around the edge
      of it. I will take a picture and post it to the group. Maybe someone
      else has a similar dime.

      Thanks,
      Wes
    • Mike Diamond <mdia1@aol.com>
      Welcome to the group. Grooved edges may be found on nickels and quarters as well. Arnie Margolis investigated this phenomenon some years ago and his contacts
      Message 2 of 5 , Feb 6, 2003
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        Welcome to the group.

        Grooved edges may be found on nickels and quarters as well. Arnie
        Margolis investigated this phenomenon some years ago and his contacts
        at the mint told him that the grooves in the edge were created by
        worn grooves in the upset mill. That makes sense for quarters, where
        the harder outer clad layers may cause accelerated wear in the floor
        of the grooves, producing parallel ruts. However, it makes less
        sense for nickels, where the coin is composed of a solid alloy.

        I have seen blank nickel and quarter planchets with grooves, which
        would seem to add some support for this idea. However, I haven't
        entirely dismissed the idea that these grooves are instead created by
        counting machines, rolling machines, or some other piece of machinery
        that the coins (and the occasional unstruck planchet) pass through
        after the coinage press. I haven't conducted a detailed, microscopic
        study to see which idea is best supported by the physical evidence.

        Some of the grooves seem a little too prominent, a little too sharp,
        and a little too "fresh" (at least to my eyes) for a feature that
        should be largely obliterated by the strike.

        Anyway, we await your photos with interest.

        --- In errorcoininformationexchange@yahoogroups.com, "Wes
        <aihacker@y...>" <aihacker@y...> wrote:
        > I am new to the group. I'm amazed at how many coin errors there
        are,
        > looking through the photos in this group. I've only come across one
        > coin error, but don't know how to find out how much it's worth. The
        > coin is a dime. It doesn't appear to have any defects until you
        look
        > at the edge, there is a groove that goes all the way around the
        edge
        > of it. I will take a picture and post it to the group. Maybe
        someone
        > else has a similar dime.
        >
        > Thanks,
        > Wes
      • Mike Diamond <mdia1@aol.com>
        There are hundreds of basic error types (with new ones being added all the time), a variety of effects associated with each error type, and an infinite number
        Message 3 of 5 , Feb 6, 2003
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          There are hundreds of basic error types (with new ones being added
          all the time), a variety of effects associated with each error type,
          and an infinite number of combinations and permutations. That's one
          reason why we are all fascinated by this hobby and why the
          comparatively simple task of collecting coins by design, date, and
          mintmark pales in comparison.

          --- In errorcoininformationexchange@yahoogroups.com, "Wes
          <aihacker@y...>" <aihacker@y...> wrote:
          > I'm amazed at how many coin errors there are,
          > looking through the photos in this group.
        • Wes <aihacker@yahoo.com>
          I was talking with a guy who has connections with the mints. He said for a while workers were purposely making mistakes on gold dollars and selling them on
          Message 4 of 5 , Feb 7, 2003
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            I was talking with a guy who has connections with the mints. He said
            for a while workers were purposely making mistakes on gold dollars
            and selling them on ebay. When the feds busted them, the mint vowed
            to take measure to ensure quality. The value should go up after
            awhile.


            --- In errorcoininformationexchange@yahoogroups.com, "Mike Diamond
            <mdia1@a...>" <mdia1@a...> wrote:
            > There are hundreds of basic error types (with new ones being added
            > all the time), a variety of effects associated with each error
            type,
            > and an infinite number of combinations and permutations. That's
            one
            > reason why we are all fascinated by this hobby and why the
            > comparatively simple task of collecting coins by design, date, and
            > mintmark pales in comparison.
            >
            > --- In errorcoininformationexchange@yahoogroups.com, "Wes
            > <aihacker@y...>" <aihacker@y...> wrote:
            > > I'm amazed at how many coin errors there are,
            > > looking through the photos in this group.
          • Mike Diamond <mdia1@aol.com>
            Several people have been arrested and charged with smuggling errors out of the Philadelphia Mint. I haven t heard that anyone has been charged with
            Message 5 of 5 , Feb 8, 2003
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              Several people have been arrested and charged with smuggling errors
              out of the Philadelphia Mint. I haven't heard that anyone has been
              charged with manufacturing errors. However a number of unique,
              seemingly impossible errors, may have had assistance. The dollar
              coins you're probably referring to are the
              Washington/Sacagawea "mule" errors, in which a Washington quarter
              obverse die was matched with a dollar reverse die in a dollar press.
              As exotic as this combination is, it is even more astonishing that
              there are three die pairs known. There are 10 examples that have
              appeared on the market, and the government has declared that the
              majority were smuggled out. It has acknowledged that only one die
              pair represents an accident. It has remained mum about the other two.

              --- In errorcoininformationexchange@yahoogroups.com, "Wes
              <aihacker@y...>" <aihacker@y...> wrote:
              > I was talking with a guy who has connections with the mints. He
              said
              > for a while workers were purposely making mistakes on gold dollars
              > and selling them on ebay. When the feds busted them, the mint vowed
              > to take measure to ensure quality. The value should go up after
              > awhile.
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