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Re: [Error Coin Information Exchange] Re: Deeply puzzled by this Indian brockage

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  • jeff ylitalo
    Eye, Skipper. Will do. ________________________________ From: Mike Diamond To: errorcoininformationexchange@yahoogroups.com Sent: Friday,
    Message 1 of 26 , Sep 30, 2011
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      Eye, Skipper.

      Will do.


      From: Mike Diamond <mdia1@...>
      To: errorcoininformationexchange@yahoogroups.com
      Sent: Friday, September 30, 2011 6:23 PM
      Subject: [Error Coin Information Exchange] Re: Deeply puzzled by this Indian brockage

       
      Thanks for looking, anyway. I've owned a number of Indian coins (as well as coins from other countries, with a bulge on the face struck by the anvil die. In those cases, it was clear that the recess into which the coin metal bulged was an indent or a partial brockage on the underlying coin. But in no case did the bulge have a ragged internal margin.

      If you go back to my article "Brockage-Counterbrockage Errors. The Eightfold path" (published in Errorscope) you'll find that the last specimen, a 2 rupee coin, has a counterbrockage sitting atop the bulge.

      --- In errorcoininformationexchange@yahoogroups.com, "jylitalo" <jylitalo@...> wrote:
      >
      > Well, I couldn't even come close to catching that 'hail mary' pass I threw myself.
      >
      > Nothing even close to what you've got on your 5 rupee.
      >
      > It was fun to look anyway and do some reviewing ;)
      >
      >
      > --- In errorcoininformationexchange@yahoogroups.com, "jylitalo" <jylitalo@> wrote:
      > >
      > > Also, I'm not saying that 'invisible' strikes are due to clipped plan's ONLY.....obviously......they are not.....I know this.
      > >
      > > I need to review the hardware in my bag...my guana...if ya will, and find some of em' that just ain't quite right..........and I have a few enough.
      > >
      > > Jeff
      > >
      > > --- In errorcoininformationexchange@yahoogroups.com, "jylitalo" <jylitalo@> wrote:
      > > >
      > > > Also, I'm not sure why I never made the connection to 'invisible strikes' and clipped plan's being a player.
      > > >
      > > > Perhaps because my brain was unable to digest the look and feel of these error coins. (These many samples, though scattered and are in the Indian denominations are a special group or a "satchel" of errors I have............Funny how that works,....I guess. Maybe it was that I wasn't ready to see it just yet.... (If that pleases everyone, then I'm no longer doomed, and if it doesn't, then "oh well" and I will follow the beam and keep on keepin on........
      > > >
      > > > Jeff
      > > >
      > > > --- In errorcoininformationexchange@yahoogroups.com, "jylitalo" <jylitalo@> wrote:
      > > > >
      > > > >
      > > > > I've got a pretty, (I guess you could call it an, 'extremely hard' to
      > > > > find, if not 'rarely' seen), 50% clip on a Jeff nickel which was
      > > > > die-struck on the obverse face and is completely uniface on the reverse.
      > > > >
      > > > > So I'm looking very closely at this uniface 'reverse' just now, if that
      > > > > pleases ya.
      > > > >
      > > > > Since this un-struck nickel clipped plan was atop another un-struck plan
      > > > > before being struck, I can now clearly see how it would have left a
      > > > > jagged, rough, though still elliptic outline on the plan it sat upon.
      > > > > (This outline represents and shows the the allowance afforded for metal
      > > > > flow).
      > > > >
      > > > > It most certainly would have left a featureless indent on the underlying
      > > > > plan and less than perfect. (We can agree and I hope we met in the
      > > > > clearing at the end of the path, someday).
      > > > >
      > > > > Indeed, the outline left on the underlying plan from this particular
      > > > > clipped nickel pan left upon the plan underneath would appear (if it
      > > > > does you well) as jagged, rough, and far, far away from a perfect
      > > > > semi-circular (since it was clipped when blanked).
      > > > >
      > > > > http://groups.yahoo.com/group/errorcoininformationexchange/photos/album/\
      > > > > 575573302/pic/85744152/view?picmode=&mode=tn&order=ordinal&start=21&coun\
      > > > > t=20&dir=asc
      > > > > <http://groups.yahoo.com/group/errorcoininformationexchange/photos/album\
      > > > > /575573302/pic/85744152/view?picmode=&mode=tn&order=ordinal&start=21&cou\
      > > > > nt=20&dir=asc>
      > > > >
      > > > > --- In errorcoininformationexchange@yahoogroups.com, "Mike Diamond"
      > > > > <mdia1@> wrote:
      > > > > >
      > > > > > --- In errorcoininformationexchange@yahoogroups.com, "jylitalo"
      > > > > jylitalo@ wrote:
      > > > > > >
      > > > > > > Perhaps it could have been a partial die-cap which adhered to the
      > > > > hammer die........(I have been able to acquire over the last ten years
      > > > > hammer die caps from India, (though none are partial caps, which are 10,
      > > > > 20, 50 pasia and 1 rupee in denomination).
      > > > > >
      > > > > > This is certainly possible.
      > > > > >
      > > > > > > Never have I seen a 5 rupee die cap and as mentioned, the weight and
      > > > > thickness of a 5 rupee would be a huge eliminator...however;
      > > > > > >
      > > > > > > I could see a partial 5 rupee die cap totally worn down which would
      > > > > have created the slightly recessed, featureless area.
      > > > > >
      > > > > > It need not have been a late-stage or uniface partial die cap that
      > > > > created the indented area in the bottom coin. Even if there were incuse
      > > > > design elements in the floor of the recess, they wouldn't have been
      > > > > picked up by the top coin in the form of a counterbrockage. Striking
      > > > > pressure was too low, and the metal of the overlying planchet didn't
      > > > > advance very far into the recess.
      > > > > >
      > > > > > I have seen a number of coins with swellings on the face struck by the
      > > > > anvil die that did show counterbrockage design elements. In these
      > > > > cases, it's clear that the indentation in the bottom coin was caused by
      > > > > a coin, or in some cases, a partial die cap.
      > > > > >
      > > > > > Could it be that the hammer die might/could have had a partial cap
      > > > > hang around long enough to actually be a "third" planchet...meaning it
      > > > > was still present even when your auction coin was struck? ... and that
      > > > > would definitely interfere with a MUCH weaker strike which spat out your
      > > > > coin.
      > > > > >
      > > > > > Again, if there had been a third object sandwiched between the top and
      > > > > bottom coin, it would have left a recess in the top coin.
      > > > > > >
      > > > > > > Just further ruminations.......'hot diggity dog' and anything else
      > > > > that might be, at this point anyway, a qualified SWAG.(scientific wild
      > > > > ass guess)....LOL
      > > > > >
      > > > >
      > > >
      > >
      >



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