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Re: [Error Coin Information Exchange] Re: 1941 nickel

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  • nathan simmons
    The flux can be removed by reheating the coin, the trick here is holding the coin on it s edge. You can accomplish this if you have a pair of hemostats coated
    Message 1 of 7 , Aug 15, 2011
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      The flux can be removed by reheating the coin, the trick here is holding the coin on it's edge. You can accomplish this if you have a pair of hemostats coated in silicone rubber (silicone rubber will tahe heat up to 540 degrees F.) if you heat the nickel to the point where the flux can be knocked off by tapping it while it's hot "on a hard surface"....."it should just fall off".....you can then quench the nickel in cold water and the color will revert back to normal (but do this with another nickel of the same date that's of low grade first)
        Then there's a product called "kaboom" that you can buy in most stores like walmart and spray onto your nickel and just let it sit for a minute and wash it off with clear running water for a few minutes and then take a clean paper towel and wipe it dry. The color will be just like it was before you removed the flux but the flux should be gone. if it's not?....take a vinyl eraser and remove the flux coloring, it'll lokk just like the rest of the nickel. Now,....I don't normally suggest cleaning a coin under any circumstances but this circumstance is beyond normal and if the coin is that important to you, that's what I suggest.
       
      Nathan

      From: "innff@..." <innff@...>
      To: errorcoininformationexchange@yahoogroups.com
      Sent: Monday, August 15, 2011 9:34 AM
      Subject: Re: [Error Coin Information Exchange] Re: 1941 nickel

       
      The problem is not with the solder but with the flux that was probably in with the solder to help it bond with the host metal. Most solders have a melt point below 350 C, so they can be easily melted off (or burned off) the nickel which has a metal point of about 1455 C and copper with a melt point of 1084 C.
       
      However, the flux clears the oxides from the metal's surfaces which helps the bonding of the solder to the host metal. So, even though you may clear all the solder off the host metal, there will always be some discoloration left by the actions of the flux. 
       
       
      In a message dated 8/15/2011 11:47:46 A.M. Eastern Daylight Time, goldpans@... writes:
       

      Anyone know how to remove the solder without further damage?
      It already looks like it's been painted on both sides. To hide discoloration?


      --- In errorcoininformationexchange@yahoogroups.com, Norm Higgs <norm@...> wrote:
      >
      > In the 1940's a nickel was worth far more than it is today - A little
      > bit of solder on it would certainly cost far less back then than it
      > would today. Old vending machines worked by the coins size and weight -
      > today they use a combination of size, weight and electromagnetic
      > signature. I could definitely imagine some enterprising young man adding
      > some solder to it so he could buy a pack of smokes with it or something.
      > People have certainly done stranger things.
      >
      > Norm Higgs
      > http://forbiddenpc.com
      > http://forbiddenpc.blogspot.com
      > http://www.power-blog.com/info/4365
      > http://freetrafficbar.com?r=74276
      >
      >
      > On 2011-08-13 5:20 PM, tumbleweed wrote:
      > > Underneath the solder it is very thin.
      > > Why would anyone do this to a 5 cent piece when it would cost more than face value to add the solder?
      > > Then again I got a counterfeit quarter in change several years back.
      > > --- In errorcoininformationexchange@yahoogroups.com, Norm Higgs<norm@> wrote:
      > >> It looks to me as if it was a rolled thin coin and someone added solder
      > >> to it to increase its weight to normal - perhaps so it would work in old
      > >> style vending machines.
      > >>
      > >> Norm Higgs
      > >> http://forbiddenpc.com
      > >> http://forbiddenpc.blogspot.com
      > >> http://www.power-blog.com/info/4365
      > >> http://freetrafficbar.com?r=74276
      > >>
      > >>
      > >> On 2011-08-13 10:13 AM, tumbleweed wrote:
      > >>> I agree.
      > >>> Never know how it was vandalised, still curious as to the physics of this coin.
      > >>>
      > >>> --- In errorcoininformationexchange@yahoogroups.com, "Mike Diamond"<mdia1@> wrote:
      > >>>> Heat would not have this effect. At any rate, I am quite confident that this coin was vandalized/altered outside the Mint. There's no way a coinage press could produce this appearance.
      > >>>>
      > >>>> I do realize that one has to be careful about dismissing what seem to be obviously damaged coins. Check out this thread:
      > >>>>
      > >>>> http://www.coincommunity.com/forum/topic.asp?TOPIC_ID=91520
      > >>>>
      > >>>> The coin looked like the center of the obverse was mashed down with a cylinder of metal while simultaneously flattening out the reverse. I've seen lots of coins damaged in such a fashion. But this particular specimen turned out to be a genuine, and quite unprecedented error. The full description comes out in Coin World next week.
      > >>>>
      > >>>> --- In errorcoininformationexchange@yahoogroups.com, "tumbleweed"<goldpans@> wrote:
      > >>>>> Could the heat from solder affect the details, such as making them "sink" a bit?
      > >>>
      > >>>
      > >>> ------------------------------------
      > >>>
      > >>> Yahoo! Groups Links
      > >>>
      > >>>
      > >>>
      > >>>
      > >>>
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > > ------------------------------------
      > >
      > > Yahoo! Groups Links
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > >
      >



    • Michael Evanchik
      just my 2 cents if you will.its just a 1941 nickel with crud all over it.go on ebay and buy another.you can get a bu for 10 bucks.and spend the other one. ...
      Message 2 of 7 , Aug 15, 2011
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        just my 2 cents if you will.its just a 1941 nickel with crud all over it.go on ebay and buy another.you can get a bu for 10 bucks.and spend the other one.

        --- On Mon, 8/15/11, tumbleweed <goldpans@...> wrote:

        From: tumbleweed <goldpans@...>
        Subject: [Error Coin Information Exchange] Re: 1941 nickel
        To: errorcoininformationexchange@yahoogroups.com
        Date: Monday, August 15, 2011, 8:39 PM

         
        Thanks much guys.
        I have a torch but would rather use the non heat-chemical-"kaboom" method stated.

        --- In errorcoininformationexchange@yahoogroups.com, nathan simmons <theoregonartist@...> wrote:
        >
        > The flux can be removed by reheating the coin, the trick here is holding the coin on it's edge. You can accomplish this if you have a pair of hemostats coated in silicone rubber (silicone rubber will tahe heat up to 540 degrees F.) if you heat the nickel to the point where the flux can be knocked off by tapping it while it's hot "on a hard surface"....."it should just fall off".....you can then quench the nickel in cold water and the color will revert back to normal (but do this with another nickel of the same date that's of low grade first)
        >   Then there's a product called "kaboom" that you can buy in most stores like walmart and spray onto your nickel and just let it sit for a minute and wash it off with clear running water for a few minutes and then take a clean paper towel and wipe it dry. The color will be just like it was before you removed the flux but the flux should be gone. if it's not?....take a vinyl eraser and remove the flux coloring, it'll lokk just like the rest of the nickel. Now,....I don't normally suggest cleaning a coin under any circumstances but this circumstance is beyond normal and if the coin is that important to you, that's what I suggest.
        >  
        > Nathan
        >
        > From: "innff@..." <innff@...>
        > To: errorcoininformationexchange@yahoogroups.com
        > Sent: Monday, August 15, 2011 9:34 AM
        > Subject: Re: [Error Coin Information Exchange] Re: 1941 nickel
        >
        >
        >  
        >
        > The problem is not with the solder but with the flux that was probably in
        > with the solder to help it bond with the host metal. Most solders have a
        > melt point below 350 C, so they can be easily melted off (or burned
        > off) the nickel which has a metal point of about 1455 C and copper with a
        > melt point of 1084 C.
        >
        > However, the flux clears the oxides from the metal's surfaces which helps
        > the bonding of the solder to the host metal. So, even though you may clear all
        > the solder off the host metal, there will always be some discoloration left by
        > the actions of the flux. 
        >
        >
        > In a message dated 8/15/2011 11:47:46 A.M. Eastern Daylight Time,
        > goldpans@... writes:
        >  
        > >
        > >Anyone know how to remove the solder without further damage?
        > >It
        > already looks like it's been painted on both sides. To hide
        > discoloration?
        > >
        > >
        > >--- In errorcoininformationexchange@yahoogroups.com, Norm Higgs <norm@> wrote:
        > >>
        > >> In the 1940's a nickel was
        > worth far more than it is today - A little
        > >> bit of solder on it would
        > certainly cost far less back then than it
        > >> would today. Old vending
        > machines worked by the coins size and weight -
        > >> today they use a
        > combination of size, weight and electromagnetic
        > >> signature. I could
        > definitely imagine some enterprising young man adding
        > >> some solder to
        > it so he could buy a pack of smokes with it or something.
        > >> People have
        > certainly done stranger things.
        > >>
        > >> Norm Higgs
        > >> http://forbiddenpc.com
        > >> http://forbiddenpc.blogspot.com
        > >> http://www.power-blog.com/info/4365
        > >> http://freetrafficbar.com?r=74276
        > >>
        > >>
        > >> On 2011-08-13 5:20 PM, tumbleweed wrote:
        > >> >
        > Underneath the solder it is very thin.
        > >> > Why would anyone do this
        > to a 5 cent piece when it would cost more than face value to add the
        > solder?
        > >> > Then again I got a counterfeit quarter in change several
        > years back.
        > >> > --- In errorcoininformationexchange@yahoogroups.com, Norm Higgs<norm@> wrote:
        > >> >> It looks to me as if it was a
        > rolled thin coin and someone added solder
        > >> >> to it to increase
        > its weight to normal - perhaps so it would work in old
        > >> >> style
        > vending machines.
        > >> >>
        > >> >> Norm Higgs
        > >>
        > >> http://forbiddenpc.com
        > >> >> http://forbiddenpc.blogspot.com
        > >>
        > >> http://www.power-blog.com/info/4365
        > >>
        > >> http://freetrafficbar.com?r=74276
        > >>
        > >>
        > >> >>
        > >> >> On 2011-08-13 10:13 AM, tumbleweed
        > wrote:
        > >> >>> I agree.
        > >> >>> Never know how it
        > was vandalised, still curious as to the physics of this coin.
        > >>
        > >>>
        > >> >>> --- In errorcoininformationexchange@yahoogroups.com, "Mike Diamond"<mdia1@> wrote:
        > >> >>>> Heat would not
        > have this effect. At any rate, I am quite confident that this coin was
        > vandalized/altered outside the Mint. There's no way a coinage press could
        > produce this appearance.
        > >> >>>>
        > >> >>>> I
        > do realize that one has to be careful about dismissing what seem to be
        > obviously damaged coins. Check out this thread:
        > >>
        > >>>>
        > >> >>>> http://www.coincommunity.com/forum/topic.asp?TOPIC_ID=91520
        > >>
        > >>>>
        > >> >>>> The coin looked like the center of
        > the obverse was mashed down with a cylinder of metal while simultaneously
        > flattening out the reverse. I've seen lots of coins damaged in such a fashion.
        > But this particular specimen turned out to be a genuine, and quite
        > unprecedented error. The full description comes out in Coin World next
        > week.
        > >> >>>>
        > >> >>>> --- In errorcoininformationexchange@yahoogroups.com, "tumbleweed"<goldpans@> wrote:
        > >> >>>>> Could the
        > heat from solder affect the details, such as making them "sink" a bit?
        > >>
        > >>>
        > >> >>>
        > >> >>>
        > ------------------------------------
        > >> >>>
        > >> >>>
        > Yahoo! Groups Links
        > >> >>>
        > >> >>>
        > >>
        > >>>
        > >> >>>
        > >> >>>
        > >> >
        > >>
        > >
        > >> >
        > >> > ------------------------------------
        > >>
        > >
        > >> > Yahoo! Groups Links
        > >> >
        > >> >
        > >>
        > >
        > >> >
        > >> >
        > >>
        > >
        > >
        >

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