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Re: Looks like a stutter strike

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  • dermestid
    Very well, then. I ll henceforth use the terms Type I stutter strike , Type II stutter strike , and Type III stutter strike to distinguish the three known
    Message 1 of 13 , Jun 30, 2011
      Very well, then. I'll henceforth use the terms "Type I stutter strike", "Type II stutter strike", and "Type III stutter strike" to distinguish the three known causes of this type of peripheral design duplication.

      I'll introduce the terminology in my next Coin World column.

      --- In errorcoininformationexchange@yahoogroups.com, Michael Evanchik <ivan0000013@...> wrote:
      >
      > i also agree with bj-while it will be a bit confusing at first,eventually all will get used to the 3 classes and it will bring more clarity to the error type down the road.nice pickup mike.
      >
      > --- On Wed, 6/29/11, Mike Diamond <mdia1@...> wrote:
      >
      >
      > From: Mike Diamond <mdia1@...>
      > Subject: [Error Coin Information Exchange] Re: Looks like a stutter strike
      > To: errorcoininformationexchange@yahoogroups.com
      > Date: Wednesday, June 29, 2011, 3:16 PM
      >
      >
      >  
      >
      >
      >
      > Since stutter strikes arise from three very different causes I'm wondering if it would be worthwhile to define a Class I, Class II, and Class III stutter strike.
      >
      > Class I, the most common, arises in association with a stiff collar and a slightly off-center planchet.
      >
      > Class II arises in association with an indent or a partial brockage. This would encompass the coin we've just discussed.
      >
      > Class III arises in association with a bent planchet.
      >
      > Would this proposed classification clarify things, or just cause confusion? I await your input.
      >
      > --- In errorcoininformationexchange@yahoogroups.com, "Mike Diamond" <mdia1@> wrote:
      > >
      > > With the coin in hand I can see the tops of all four digits. The relief is extremely low. The number impressions are essentially flat and mainly appear as areas of altered reflectivity. But it's hard to expect more with this kind of stutter strike, which involves a very brief, low-impact event.
      > >
      > > I almost think I can see the Y of LIBERTY, but there's not enough there to be sure.
      > >
      > > All in all, I'm satisfied with my purchase.
      > >
      > > I now have three U.S. examples of this type of stutter strike. I'm tempted to do a column about them in Coin World, but I did cover this error type as recently as December, 2009.
      > >
      > >
      > > --- In errorcoininformationexchange@yahoogroups.com, "Mike Diamond" <mdia1@> wrote:
      > > >
      > > > I snapped up this indented, broadstruck nickel as soon as I saw it:
      > > >
      > > > http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&item=380349510792
      > > >
      > > > The obverse face shows what appears to be a classic stutter strike. To the right of the normal date you'll see a partial date and a duplication of the field portion of the die. But the coin is not double-struck.
      > > >
      > > > The intrusive planchet tipped the underlying planchet up toward the hammer die. The latter made brief, light contact with elevated portion of the planchet. This portion was moved out of the way by lateral expansion of portion of the bottom planchet beneath the indent. The hammer (obverse) die then finished its downstroke, creating the definitive design.
      > > >
      > > > This is a rare error type, so I'm happy to add an additiona example when one shows up. Interestingly, I got another, similar stutter strike from the same seller eight or so years ago. It also involved a broadstruck nickel with an indent.
      > > >
      > >
      >
    • Mike Diamond
      I ve placed photos of the 1999-P nickel with the Type II stutter strike in the Miscellaneous Errors album. The TY of LIBERTY is clearly evident in the photo,
      Message 2 of 13 , Jul 2, 2011
        I've placed photos of the 1999-P nickel with the Type II stutter strike in the Miscellaneous Errors album. The TY of LIBERTY is clearly evident in the photo, along with the date. It's amazing what photos sometimes bring out.

        A discussion of Type II stutter strikes will appear in Coin World, week after next.
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