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Re: [Error Coin Information Exchange] Re: Odd clip

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  • Michael Evanchik
    this seller in my opinion isnt the the most knowledgeable about errors,but hes been around for some time,and ive never seen a bogus error from him.ive also
    Message 1 of 13 , Jun 9, 2011
      this seller in my opinion isnt the the most knowledgeable about errors,but hes been around for some time,and ive never seen a bogus error from him.ive also bought several times from him with no problems.good seller.

      --- On Thu, 6/9/11, iberdy2 <no_reply@yahoogroups.com> wrote:

      From: iberdy2 <no_reply@yahoogroups.com>
      Subject: [Error Coin Information Exchange] Re: Odd clip
      To: errorcoininformationexchange@yahoogroups.com
      Date: Thursday, June 9, 2011, 8:34 PM

       
      I saw this too....the lack of metal flow... AND a small picture with a large description lettering PLUS the "NO RETURNS ACCEPTED" made me shy away from it. BUT your expertise has always amazed me. GL

      --- In errorcoininformationexchange@yahoogroups.com, "Mike Diamond" <mdia1@...> wrote:
      >
      > I don't recall having seen another clip exactly like this:
      >
      > http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&item=260793748395
      >
      > It's possible that this is an elliptical clip with one side of the ellipse interrupted by a curved clip. Far less likely is a corner clip interrupted by a curved clip.
      >
      > I should be in a better position to assess the nature of this clip after it arrives.
      >

    • Mike Diamond
      The seller is merely a conduit for coins sent by her consigner. While some have been inaccurately described, I ve never encountered a fake. I m reasonably
      Message 2 of 13 , Jun 10, 2011
        The seller is merely a conduit for coins sent by her consigner. While some have been inaccurately described, I've never encountered a fake.

        I'm reasonably confident this is genuine because the reverse face shows finning of the rim. This is a common side-effect of large clips, as all the force of the strike is concentrated in a smaller area.

        --- In errorcoininformationexchange@yahoogroups.com, iberdy2 <no_reply@...> wrote:
        >
        > I saw this too....the lack of metal flow... AND a small picture with a large description lettering PLUS the "NO RETURNS ACCEPTED" made me shy away from it. BUT your expertise has always amazed me. GL
        >
        >
        >
        > --- In errorcoininformationexchange@yahoogroups.com, "Mike Diamond" <mdia1@> wrote:
        > >
        > > I don't recall having seen another clip exactly like this:
        > >
        > > http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&item=260793748395
        > >
        > > It's possible that this is an elliptical clip with one side of the ellipse interrupted by a curved clip. Far less likely is a corner clip interrupted by a curved clip.
        > >
        > > I should be in a better position to assess the nature of this clip after it arrives.
        > >
        >
      • fred_weinberg
        Yes, as Mike mentiioned, the coin is a genuine clip, and I m looking forward to your analysis of it. The seller is a relative of the owner, and as you said, he
        Message 3 of 13 , Jun 10, 2011
          Yes, as Mike mentiioned, the coin is a genuine clip,
          and I'm looking forward to your analysis of it.

          The seller is a relative of the owner, and as you
          said, he knows pretty much what's a genuine error
          and what's damage......

          I've purchased tens of thousands of errors from
          him in the past 10 years or so, but now, due to
          the new presses, he gets substantially less material
          that in the past, and he has the relative put the
          material up on Ebay.

          He's a great guy, and he'll be in Chicago during
          the ANA. A few of his 'put aside' errors will be
          in the Heritage Pre-ANA auction - a couple of really
          nice items that he wanted to auction......
          --- In errorcoininformationexchange@yahoogroups.com, "Mike Diamond" <mdia1@...> wrote:
          >
          > The seller is merely a conduit for coins sent by her consigner. While some have been inaccurately described, I've never encountered a fake.
          >
          > I'm reasonably confident this is genuine because the reverse face shows finning of the rim. This is a common side-effect of large clips, as all the force of the strike is concentrated in a smaller area.
          >
          > --- In errorcoininformationexchange@yahoogroups.com, iberdy2 <no_reply@> wrote:
          > >
          > > I saw this too....the lack of metal flow... AND a small picture with a large description lettering PLUS the "NO RETURNS ACCEPTED" made me shy away from it. BUT your expertise has always amazed me. GL
          > >
          > >
          > >
          > > --- In errorcoininformationexchange@yahoogroups.com, "Mike Diamond" <mdia1@> wrote:
          > > >
          > > > I don't recall having seen another clip exactly like this:
          > > >
          > > > http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&item=260793748395
          > > >
          > > > It's possible that this is an elliptical clip with one side of the ellipse interrupted by a curved clip. Far less likely is a corner clip interrupted by a curved clip.
          > > >
          > > > I should be in a better position to assess the nature of this clip after it arrives.
          > > >
          > >
          >
        • Mike Diamond
          The key to figuring out what kind of clip(s) I m dealing with will be edge texture and asymmetry in core exposure. If I see a nice cut-and-tear texture along
          Message 4 of 13 , Jun 10, 2011
            The key to figuring out what kind of clip(s) I'm dealing with will be edge texture and asymmetry in core exposure. If I see a nice cut-and-tear texture along the outer edge two angled ends that will support these being the ends of an elliptical clip. Any odd, irregular texture will support some other scenario.

            If the visible core is closer to one face, that will also support an interrupted elliptical clip as the explanation for the two angled ends. If the asymmetry along the normal, reeded edge is the same as that seen on the two angled ends, that will add further support to the idea of an interrupted elliptical clip. If the asymmetry along the edge of the curved clip is in the opposite direction, that will provide the final, necessary piece of evidence.

            Of course, the coin could be so thin from the extra pressure that none of this will be visible.

            --- In errorcoininformationexchange@yahoogroups.com, fred_weinberg <no_reply@...> wrote:
            >
            >
            > Yes, as Mike mentiioned, the coin is a genuine clip,
            > and I'm looking forward to your analysis of it.
            >
            > The seller is a relative of the owner, and as you
            > said, he knows pretty much what's a genuine error
            > and what's damage......
            >
            > I've purchased tens of thousands of errors from
            > him in the past 10 years or so, but now, due to
            > the new presses, he gets substantially less material
            > that in the past, and he has the relative put the
            > material up on Ebay.
            >
            > He's a great guy, and he'll be in Chicago during
            > the ANA. A few of his 'put aside' errors will be
            > in the Heritage Pre-ANA auction - a couple of really
            > nice items that he wanted to auction......
            > --- In errorcoininformationexchange@yahoogroups.com, "Mike Diamond" <mdia1@> wrote:
            > >
            > > The seller is merely a conduit for coins sent by her consigner. While some have been inaccurately described, I've never encountered a fake.
            > >
            > > I'm reasonably confident this is genuine because the reverse face shows finning of the rim. This is a common side-effect of large clips, as all the force of the strike is concentrated in a smaller area.
            > >
            > > --- In errorcoininformationexchange@yahoogroups.com, iberdy2 <no_reply@> wrote:
            > > >
            > > > I saw this too....the lack of metal flow... AND a small picture with a large description lettering PLUS the "NO RETURNS ACCEPTED" made me shy away from it. BUT your expertise has always amazed me. GL
            > > >
            > > >
            > > >
            > > > --- In errorcoininformationexchange@yahoogroups.com, "Mike Diamond" <mdia1@> wrote:
            > > > >
            > > > > I don't recall having seen another clip exactly like this:
            > > > >
            > > > > http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&item=260793748395
            > > > >
            > > > > It's possible that this is an elliptical clip with one side of the ellipse interrupted by a curved clip. Far less likely is a corner clip interrupted by a curved clip.
            > > > >
            > > > > I should be in a better position to assess the nature of this clip after it arrives.
            > > > >
            > > >
            > >
            >
          • Mike Diamond
            With the coin in hand, I can now confirm that the two angled ends most likely represent the ends of an elliptical clip interrupted by a curved clip. The
            Message 5 of 13 , Jun 13, 2011
              With the coin in hand, I can now confirm that the two angled ends most likely represent the ends of an elliptical clip interrupted by a curved clip. The exposed copper core is closest to the reverse face on the normal reeded edge and the outer edge of the two angled ends. In fact, there's unbroken continuity between the exposed core in these areas. By contrast, the exposed core along the edge of the curved clip is closer to the obverse face.

              It may be that a blank with a curved clip hung up in its hole in the coin metal strip and was then sliced through again by the blanking die. Alternatively, an elliptical clip blank may have gotten trapped beneath the moving coin metal strip and gotten sliced through by the blanking die on a second (or, more accurately, a third) pass.

              I think this is a pretty cool blanking error that's worth a write-up in Coin World. It goes well with my quadruple-struck dime in which one clip is elliptical and the other three curved. If any of you have any multi-clip/elliptical clip combination errors you'd like to have included in the treatment, let me know.

              --- In errorcoininformationexchange@yahoogroups.com, "Mike Diamond" <mdia1@...> wrote:
              >
              > The key to figuring out what kind of clip(s) I'm dealing with will be edge texture and asymmetry in core exposure. If I see a nice cut-and-tear texture along the outer edge two angled ends that will support these being the ends of an elliptical clip. Any odd, irregular texture will support some other scenario.
              >
              > If the visible core is closer to one face, that will also support an interrupted elliptical clip as the explanation for the two angled ends. If the asymmetry along the normal, reeded edge is the same as that seen on the two angled ends, that will add further support to the idea of an interrupted elliptical clip. If the asymmetry along the edge of the curved clip is in the opposite direction, that will provide the final, necessary piece of evidence.
              >
              > Of course, the coin could be so thin from the extra pressure that none of this will be visible.
              >
              > --- In errorcoininformationexchange@yahoogroups.com, fred_weinberg <no_reply@> wrote:
              > >
              > >
              > > Yes, as Mike mentiioned, the coin is a genuine clip,
              > > and I'm looking forward to your analysis of it.
              > >
              > > The seller is a relative of the owner, and as you
              > > said, he knows pretty much what's a genuine error
              > > and what's damage......
              > >
              > > I've purchased tens of thousands of errors from
              > > him in the past 10 years or so, but now, due to
              > > the new presses, he gets substantially less material
              > > that in the past, and he has the relative put the
              > > material up on Ebay.
              > >
              > > He's a great guy, and he'll be in Chicago during
              > > the ANA. A few of his 'put aside' errors will be
              > > in the Heritage Pre-ANA auction - a couple of really
              > > nice items that he wanted to auction......
              > > --- In errorcoininformationexchange@yahoogroups.com, "Mike Diamond" <mdia1@> wrote:
              > > >
              > > > The seller is merely a conduit for coins sent by her consigner. While some have been inaccurately described, I've never encountered a fake.
              > > >
              > > > I'm reasonably confident this is genuine because the reverse face shows finning of the rim. This is a common side-effect of large clips, as all the force of the strike is concentrated in a smaller area.
              > > >
              > > > --- In errorcoininformationexchange@yahoogroups.com, iberdy2 <no_reply@> wrote:
              > > > >
              > > > > I saw this too....the lack of metal flow... AND a small picture with a large description lettering PLUS the "NO RETURNS ACCEPTED" made me shy away from it. BUT your expertise has always amazed me. GL
              > > > >
              > > > >
              > > > >
              > > > > --- In errorcoininformationexchange@yahoogroups.com, "Mike Diamond" <mdia1@> wrote:
              > > > > >
              > > > > > I don't recall having seen another clip exactly like this:
              > > > > >
              > > > > > http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&item=260793748395
              > > > > >
              > > > > > It's possible that this is an elliptical clip with one side of the ellipse interrupted by a curved clip. Far less likely is a corner clip interrupted by a curved clip.
              > > > > >
              > > > > > I should be in a better position to assess the nature of this clip after it arrives.
              > > > > >
              > > > >
              > > >
              > >
              >
            • Travis
              Mike. Are you looking for combination clip errors only, or are you looking for clip errors combined with other errors (such as striking errors)?
              Message 6 of 13 , Jun 13, 2011
                Mike. Are you looking for combination clip errors only, or are you looking for clip errors combined with other errors (such as striking errors)?

                --- In errorcoininformationexchange@yahoogroups.com, "Mike Diamond" <mdia1@...> wrote:
                >
                > With the coin in hand, I can now confirm that the two angled ends most likely represent the ends of an elliptical clip interrupted by a curved clip. The exposed copper core is closest to the reverse face on the normal reeded edge and the outer edge of the two angled ends. In fact, there's unbroken continuity between the exposed core in these areas. By contrast, the exposed core along the edge of the curved clip is closer to the obverse face.
                >
                > It may be that a blank with a curved clip hung up in its hole in the coin metal strip and was then sliced through again by the blanking die. Alternatively, an elliptical clip blank may have gotten trapped beneath the moving coin metal strip and gotten sliced through by the blanking die on a second (or, more accurately, a third) pass.
                >
                > I think this is a pretty cool blanking error that's worth a write-up in Coin World. It goes well with my quadruple-struck dime in which one clip is elliptical and the other three curved. If any of you have any multi-clip/elliptical clip combination errors you'd like to have included in the treatment, let me know.
                >
                > --- In errorcoininformationexchange@yahoogroups.com, "Mike Diamond" <mdia1@> wrote:
                > >
                > > The key to figuring out what kind of clip(s) I'm dealing with will be edge texture and asymmetry in core exposure. If I see a nice cut-and-tear texture along the outer edge two angled ends that will support these being the ends of an elliptical clip. Any odd, irregular texture will support some other scenario.
                > >
                > > If the visible core is closer to one face, that will also support an interrupted elliptical clip as the explanation for the two angled ends. If the asymmetry along the normal, reeded edge is the same as that seen on the two angled ends, that will add further support to the idea of an interrupted elliptical clip. If the asymmetry along the edge of the curved clip is in the opposite direction, that will provide the final, necessary piece of evidence.
                > >
                > > Of course, the coin could be so thin from the extra pressure that none of this will be visible.
                > >
                > > --- In errorcoininformationexchange@yahoogroups.com, fred_weinberg <no_reply@> wrote:
                > > >
                > > >
                > > > Yes, as Mike mentiioned, the coin is a genuine clip,
                > > > and I'm looking forward to your analysis of it.
                > > >
                > > > The seller is a relative of the owner, and as you
                > > > said, he knows pretty much what's a genuine error
                > > > and what's damage......
                > > >
                > > > I've purchased tens of thousands of errors from
                > > > him in the past 10 years or so, but now, due to
                > > > the new presses, he gets substantially less material
                > > > that in the past, and he has the relative put the
                > > > material up on Ebay.
                > > >
                > > > He's a great guy, and he'll be in Chicago during
                > > > the ANA. A few of his 'put aside' errors will be
                > > > in the Heritage Pre-ANA auction - a couple of really
                > > > nice items that he wanted to auction......
                > > > --- In errorcoininformationexchange@yahoogroups.com, "Mike Diamond" <mdia1@> wrote:
                > > > >
                > > > > The seller is merely a conduit for coins sent by her consigner. While some have been inaccurately described, I've never encountered a fake.
                > > > >
                > > > > I'm reasonably confident this is genuine because the reverse face shows finning of the rim. This is a common side-effect of large clips, as all the force of the strike is concentrated in a smaller area.
                > > > >
                > > > > --- In errorcoininformationexchange@yahoogroups.com, iberdy2 <no_reply@> wrote:
                > > > > >
                > > > > > I saw this too....the lack of metal flow... AND a small picture with a large description lettering PLUS the "NO RETURNS ACCEPTED" made me shy away from it. BUT your expertise has always amazed me. GL
                > > > > >
                > > > > >
                > > > > >
                > > > > > --- In errorcoininformationexchange@yahoogroups.com, "Mike Diamond" <mdia1@> wrote:
                > > > > > >
                > > > > > > I don't recall having seen another clip exactly like this:
                > > > > > >
                > > > > > > http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&item=260793748395
                > > > > > >
                > > > > > > It's possible that this is an elliptical clip with one side of the ellipse interrupted by a curved clip. Far less likely is a corner clip interrupted by a curved clip.
                > > > > > >
                > > > > > > I should be in a better position to assess the nature of this clip after it arrives.
                > > > > > >
                > > > > >
                > > > >
                > > >
                > >
                >
              • Travis
                Now that I have reread, I m guessing you meant quadruple-clipped dime instead of quadruple-struck.
                Message 7 of 13 , Jun 13, 2011
                  Now that I have reread, I'm guessing you meant quadruple-clipped dime instead of quadruple-struck.

                  --- In errorcoininformationexchange@yahoogroups.com, "Mike Diamond" <mdia1@...> wrote:
                  >
                  > With the coin in hand, I can now confirm that the two angled ends most likely represent the ends of an elliptical clip interrupted by a curved clip. The exposed copper core is closest to the reverse face on the normal reeded edge and the outer edge of the two angled ends. In fact, there's unbroken continuity between the exposed core in these areas. By contrast, the exposed core along the edge of the curved clip is closer to the obverse face.
                  >
                  > It may be that a blank with a curved clip hung up in its hole in the coin metal strip and was then sliced through again by the blanking die. Alternatively, an elliptical clip blank may have gotten trapped beneath the moving coin metal strip and gotten sliced through by the blanking die on a second (or, more accurately, a third) pass.
                  >
                  > I think this is a pretty cool blanking error that's worth a write-up in Coin World. It goes well with my quadruple-struck dime in which one clip is elliptical and the other three curved. If any of you have any multi-clip/elliptical clip combination errors you'd like to have included in the treatment, let me know.
                  >
                  > --- In errorcoininformationexchange@yahoogroups.com, "Mike Diamond" <mdia1@> wrote:
                  > >
                  > > The key to figuring out what kind of clip(s) I'm dealing with will be edge texture and asymmetry in core exposure. If I see a nice cut-and-tear texture along the outer edge two angled ends that will support these being the ends of an elliptical clip. Any odd, irregular texture will support some other scenario.
                  > >
                  > > If the visible core is closer to one face, that will also support an interrupted elliptical clip as the explanation for the two angled ends. If the asymmetry along the normal, reeded edge is the same as that seen on the two angled ends, that will add further support to the idea of an interrupted elliptical clip. If the asymmetry along the edge of the curved clip is in the opposite direction, that will provide the final, necessary piece of evidence.
                  > >
                  > > Of course, the coin could be so thin from the extra pressure that none of this will be visible.
                  > >
                  > > --- In errorcoininformationexchange@yahoogroups.com, fred_weinberg <no_reply@> wrote:
                  > > >
                  > > >
                  > > > Yes, as Mike mentiioned, the coin is a genuine clip,
                  > > > and I'm looking forward to your analysis of it.
                  > > >
                  > > > The seller is a relative of the owner, and as you
                  > > > said, he knows pretty much what's a genuine error
                  > > > and what's damage......
                  > > >
                  > > > I've purchased tens of thousands of errors from
                  > > > him in the past 10 years or so, but now, due to
                  > > > the new presses, he gets substantially less material
                  > > > that in the past, and he has the relative put the
                  > > > material up on Ebay.
                  > > >
                  > > > He's a great guy, and he'll be in Chicago during
                  > > > the ANA. A few of his 'put aside' errors will be
                  > > > in the Heritage Pre-ANA auction - a couple of really
                  > > > nice items that he wanted to auction......
                  > > > --- In errorcoininformationexchange@yahoogroups.com, "Mike Diamond" <mdia1@> wrote:
                  > > > >
                  > > > > The seller is merely a conduit for coins sent by her consigner. While some have been inaccurately described, I've never encountered a fake.
                  > > > >
                  > > > > I'm reasonably confident this is genuine because the reverse face shows finning of the rim. This is a common side-effect of large clips, as all the force of the strike is concentrated in a smaller area.
                  > > > >
                  > > > > --- In errorcoininformationexchange@yahoogroups.com, iberdy2 <no_reply@> wrote:
                  > > > > >
                  > > > > > I saw this too....the lack of metal flow... AND a small picture with a large description lettering PLUS the "NO RETURNS ACCEPTED" made me shy away from it. BUT your expertise has always amazed me. GL
                  > > > > >
                  > > > > >
                  > > > > >
                  > > > > > --- In errorcoininformationexchange@yahoogroups.com, "Mike Diamond" <mdia1@> wrote:
                  > > > > > >
                  > > > > > > I don't recall having seen another clip exactly like this:
                  > > > > > >
                  > > > > > > http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&item=260793748395
                  > > > > > >
                  > > > > > > It's possible that this is an elliptical clip with one side of the ellipse interrupted by a curved clip. Far less likely is a corner clip interrupted by a curved clip.
                  > > > > > >
                  > > > > > > I should be in a better position to assess the nature of this clip after it arrives.
                  > > > > > >
                  > > > > >
                  > > > >
                  > > >
                  > >
                  >
                • Mike Diamond
                  Sorry, yes. I meant a quadruple-clipped dime.
                  Message 8 of 13 , Jun 13, 2011
                    Sorry, yes. I meant a quadruple-clipped dime.

                    --- In errorcoininformationexchange@yahoogroups.com, "Travis" <travisbolton543@...> wrote:
                    >
                    > Now that I have reread, I'm guessing you meant quadruple-clipped dime instead of quadruple-struck.
                    >
                    > --- In errorcoininformationexchange@yahoogroups.com, "Mike Diamond" <mdia1@> wrote:
                    > >
                    > > With the coin in hand, I can now confirm that the two angled ends most likely represent the ends of an elliptical clip interrupted by a curved clip. The exposed copper core is closest to the reverse face on the normal reeded edge and the outer edge of the two angled ends. In fact, there's unbroken continuity between the exposed core in these areas. By contrast, the exposed core along the edge of the curved clip is closer to the obverse face.
                    > >
                    > > It may be that a blank with a curved clip hung up in its hole in the coin metal strip and was then sliced through again by the blanking die. Alternatively, an elliptical clip blank may have gotten trapped beneath the moving coin metal strip and gotten sliced through by the blanking die on a second (or, more accurately, a third) pass.
                    > >
                    > > I think this is a pretty cool blanking error that's worth a write-up in Coin World. It goes well with my quadruple-struck dime in which one clip is elliptical and the other three curved. If any of you have any multi-clip/elliptical clip combination errors you'd like to have included in the treatment, let me know.
                    > >
                    > > --- In errorcoininformationexchange@yahoogroups.com, "Mike Diamond" <mdia1@> wrote:
                    > > >
                    > > > The key to figuring out what kind of clip(s) I'm dealing with will be edge texture and asymmetry in core exposure. If I see a nice cut-and-tear texture along the outer edge two angled ends that will support these being the ends of an elliptical clip. Any odd, irregular texture will support some other scenario.
                    > > >
                    > > > If the visible core is closer to one face, that will also support an interrupted elliptical clip as the explanation for the two angled ends. If the asymmetry along the normal, reeded edge is the same as that seen on the two angled ends, that will add further support to the idea of an interrupted elliptical clip. If the asymmetry along the edge of the curved clip is in the opposite direction, that will provide the final, necessary piece of evidence.
                    > > >
                    > > > Of course, the coin could be so thin from the extra pressure that none of this will be visible.
                    > > >
                    > > > --- In errorcoininformationexchange@yahoogroups.com, fred_weinberg <no_reply@> wrote:
                    > > > >
                    > > > >
                    > > > > Yes, as Mike mentiioned, the coin is a genuine clip,
                    > > > > and I'm looking forward to your analysis of it.
                    > > > >
                    > > > > The seller is a relative of the owner, and as you
                    > > > > said, he knows pretty much what's a genuine error
                    > > > > and what's damage......
                    > > > >
                    > > > > I've purchased tens of thousands of errors from
                    > > > > him in the past 10 years or so, but now, due to
                    > > > > the new presses, he gets substantially less material
                    > > > > that in the past, and he has the relative put the
                    > > > > material up on Ebay.
                    > > > >
                    > > > > He's a great guy, and he'll be in Chicago during
                    > > > > the ANA. A few of his 'put aside' errors will be
                    > > > > in the Heritage Pre-ANA auction - a couple of really
                    > > > > nice items that he wanted to auction......
                    > > > > --- In errorcoininformationexchange@yahoogroups.com, "Mike Diamond" <mdia1@> wrote:
                    > > > > >
                    > > > > > The seller is merely a conduit for coins sent by her consigner. While some have been inaccurately described, I've never encountered a fake.
                    > > > > >
                    > > > > > I'm reasonably confident this is genuine because the reverse face shows finning of the rim. This is a common side-effect of large clips, as all the force of the strike is concentrated in a smaller area.
                    > > > > >
                    > > > > > --- In errorcoininformationexchange@yahoogroups.com, iberdy2 <no_reply@> wrote:
                    > > > > > >
                    > > > > > > I saw this too....the lack of metal flow... AND a small picture with a large description lettering PLUS the "NO RETURNS ACCEPTED" made me shy away from it. BUT your expertise has always amazed me. GL
                    > > > > > >
                    > > > > > >
                    > > > > > >
                    > > > > > > --- In errorcoininformationexchange@yahoogroups.com, "Mike Diamond" <mdia1@> wrote:
                    > > > > > > >
                    > > > > > > > I don't recall having seen another clip exactly like this:
                    > > > > > > >
                    > > > > > > > http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&item=260793748395
                    > > > > > > >
                    > > > > > > > It's possible that this is an elliptical clip with one side of the ellipse interrupted by a curved clip. Far less likely is a corner clip interrupted by a curved clip.
                    > > > > > > >
                    > > > > > > > I should be in a better position to assess the nature of this clip after it arrives.
                    > > > > > > >
                    > > > > > >
                    > > > > >
                    > > > >
                    > > >
                    > >
                    >
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