Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Re: Error quiz -- figure this one out.

Expand Messages
  • Mike Diamond
    The overriding principle is that one should be very cautious when dealing with two-headed or two-tailed mules in which one face is flattened or expanded. One
    Message 1 of 17 , Mar 27, 2011
    • 0 Attachment
      The overriding principle is that one should be very cautious when dealing with two-headed or two-tailed mules in which one face is flattened or expanded. One should operate under the null hypothesis that you're probably dealing with an intentional or accidental pseudo-mule.

      My intention is not to disparage pseudo-mules. I think they're cool errors, especially when accidental. But the market value is likely to be be significantly different from that of an actual mule, especially if it's a U.S. coin.

      --- In errorcoininformationexchange@yahoogroups.com, "Mike Diamond" <mdia1@...> wrote:
      >
      > Yeah, this one:
      >
      > http://coins.ha.com/common/view_item.php?Sale_No=414&Lot_No=5810&type=top10-coinnews-tem100910
      >
      > While it could be what NGC says it is, its appearance is equally consistent with it being a two-tailed pseudo-mule. All it takes is an initial in-collar uniface strike (obverse left blank). Then it flips over and receives a second in-collar uniface strike that squashes the original reverse design. This could occur accidentally (unlikely) or intentionally.
      >
      > There are at least two other routes to creating a pseudo-mule.
      >
      > If a pseudo-mule is struck out-of-collar, it will look like a two-headed or two-tailed die cap. These types of errors do occur naturally.
      >
      > On ebay there's now a double-obverse pseudo-mule Malaysian 1 sen coin paired with a double-reverse actual mule 1 sen. The die neck of the obverse die was probably too short to use it for an actual mule, so a little bit of trickery was employed. Both coins are, of course, midnight specials.
      >
      > --- In errorcoininformationexchange@yahoogroups.com, "Travis" <travisbolton543@> wrote:
      > >
      > > I'm going to guess you are talking about the Washington quarter with eagle reverses on both sides?
      > >
      > > --- In errorcoininformationexchange@yahoogroups.com, "Mike Diamond" <mdia1@> wrote:
      > > >
      > > > I have to confess that I did buy it and in doing so, probably overpaid by at least $150. But I figured it would make for a good Collector's Clearinghouse column. A number of pseudo-mules (full, centered ones) have been slabbed by top tier grading services as true two-headed or two-tailed mules. One probable example sold for $42,000.
      > > >
      > > > --- In errorcoininformationexchange@yahoogroups.com, Rob Risi <rjrisi@> wrote:
      > > > >
      > > > > were you the winner Mike D?
      > > >
      > >
      >
    • Steve Frank
      I agree with your assessment from the photo, with the bottom photo looking like the first strike that later had a blank placed between it and the obverse die
      Message 2 of 17 , Mar 27, 2011
      • 0 Attachment
        I agree with your assessment from the photo, with the bottom photo looking like the first strike that later had a blank placed between it and the obverse die which caused the flattening. I'd bet a dollar to a doughnut that you find something unique to this reverse die present on both reverses once you break out the magnifying glass or if need be, microscope. I wonder if John Kraljevich got to see this one when he was at ANR....I usually talk colonials with him, but would be nice to see if he got to see both sides blown up for comparison.
         
        One question.....when I hear "Midnight Special", I think of Wolfman Jack and the TV Show, and next the song.....not familiar with it being used in this context....but assume it refers to a shady deal or something?
         
        Thanks for posting!!
         
                 Steve Frank
         
         
        --- On Sun, 3/27/11, Mike Diamond <mdia1@...> wrote:

        From: Mike Diamond <mdia1@...>
        Subject: [Error Coin Information Exchange] Re: Error quiz -- figure this one out.
        To: errorcoininformationexchange@yahoogroups.com
        Date: Sunday, March 27, 2011, 9:46 AM

         
        Yeah, this one:

        http://coins.ha.com/common/view_item.php?Sale_No=414&Lot_No=5810&type=top10-coinnews-tem100910

        While it could be what NGC says it is, its appearance is equally consistent with it being a two-tailed pseudo-mule. All it takes is an initial in-collar uniface strike (obverse left blank). Then it flips over and receives a second in-collar uniface strike that squashes the original reverse design. This could occur accidentally (unlikely) or intentionally.

        There are at least two other routes to creating a pseudo-mule.

        If a pseudo-mule is struck out-of-collar, it will look like a two-headed or two-tailed die cap. These types of errors do occur naturally.

        On ebay there's now a double-obverse pseudo-mule Malaysian 1 sen coin paired with a double-reverse actual mule 1 sen. The die neck of the obverse die was probably too short to use it for an actual mule, so a little bit of trickery was employed. Both coins are, of course, midnight specials.

        --- In errorcoininformationexchange@yahoogroups.com, "Travis" <travisbolton543@...> wrote:
        >
        > I'm going to guess you are talking about the Washington quarter with eagle reverses on both sides?
        >
        > --- In errorcoininformationexchange@yahoogroups.com, "Mike Diamond" <mdia1@> wrote:
        > >
        > > I have to confess that I did buy it and in doing so, probably overpaid by at least $150. But I figured it would make for a good Collector's Clearinghouse column. A number of pseudo-mules (full, centered ones) have been slabbed by top tier grading services as true two-headed or two-tailed mules. One probable example sold for $42,000.
        > >
        > > --- In errorcoininformationexchange@yahoogroups.com, Rob Risi <rjrisi@> wrote:
        > > >
        > > > were you the winner Mike D?
        > >
        >

      • Mike Diamond
        Finding common die markers on both faces would prove that it s a pseudo-mule, but few die markers will survive the crushing impact on the flattened face. Add
        Message 3 of 17 , Mar 27, 2011
        • 0 Attachment
          Finding common die markers on both faces would prove that it's a pseudo-mule, but few die markers will survive the crushing impact on the flattened face. Add to that the possibility of the texture of the planchet (tumbling marks, etc.) being transferred to the flattened face.

          Finding a different set of die markers on the two faces wouldn't necessarily invalidate the pseudo-mule scenario because a coin can end up (or be placed) in a different press for the second strike.

          --- In errorcoininformationexchange@yahoogroups.com, Steve Frank <taxi_steve929@...> wrote:
          >
          > I agree with your assessment from the photo, with the bottom photo looking like the first strike that later had a blank placed between it and the obverse die which caused the flattening. I'd bet a dollar to a doughnut that you find something unique to this reverse die present on both reverses once you break out the magnifying glass or if need be, microscope. I wonder if John Kraljevich got to see this one when he was at ANR....I usually talk colonials with him, but would be nice to see if he got to see both sides blown up for comparison.
          >  
          > One question.....when I hear "Midnight Special", I think of Wolfman Jack and the TV Show, and next the song.....not familiar with it being used in this context....but assume it refers to a shady deal or something?
          >  
          > Thanks for posting!!
          >  
          >          Steve Frank
          >  
          >  
          > --- On Sun, 3/27/11, Mike Diamond <mdia1@...> wrote:
          >
          >
          > From: Mike Diamond <mdia1@...>
          > Subject: [Error Coin Information Exchange] Re: Error quiz -- figure this one out.
          > To: errorcoininformationexchange@yahoogroups.com
          > Date: Sunday, March 27, 2011, 9:46 AM
          >
          >
          >  
          >
          >
          >
          > Yeah, this one:
          >
          > http://coins.ha.com/common/view_item.php?Sale_No=414&Lot_No=5810&type=top10-coinnews-tem100910
          >
          > While it could be what NGC says it is, its appearance is equally consistent with it being a two-tailed pseudo-mule. All it takes is an initial in-collar uniface strike (obverse left blank). Then it flips over and receives a second in-collar uniface strike that squashes the original reverse design. This could occur accidentally (unlikely) or intentionally.
          >
          > There are at least two other routes to creating a pseudo-mule.
          >
          > If a pseudo-mule is struck out-of-collar, it will look like a two-headed or two-tailed die cap. These types of errors do occur naturally.
          >
          > On ebay there's now a double-obverse pseudo-mule Malaysian 1 sen coin paired with a double-reverse actual mule 1 sen. The die neck of the obverse die was probably too short to use it for an actual mule, so a little bit of trickery was employed. Both coins are, of course, midnight specials.
          >
          > --- In errorcoininformationexchange@yahoogroups.com, "Travis" <travisbolton543@> wrote:
          > >
          > > I'm going to guess you are talking about the Washington quarter with eagle reverses on both sides?
          > >
          > > --- In errorcoininformationexchange@yahoogroups.com, "Mike Diamond" <mdia1@> wrote:
          > > >
          > > > I have to confess that I did buy it and in doing so, probably overpaid by at least $150. But I figured it would make for a good Collector's Clearinghouse column. A number of pseudo-mules (full, centered ones) have been slabbed by top tier grading services as true two-headed or two-tailed mules. One probable example sold for $42,000.
          > > >
          > > > --- In errorcoininformationexchange@yahoogroups.com, Rob Risi <rjrisi@> wrote:
          > > > >
          > > > > were you the winner Mike D?
          > > >
          > >
          >
        • Steve Frank
          I understand, and look forward to any new info you can post on this one. I assume you or someone you highly regard examined this in hand. I would love to
          Message 4 of 17 , Mar 27, 2011
          • 0 Attachment
            I understand, and look forward to any new info you can post on this one. I assume you or someone you highly regard examined this in hand. I would love to see a 10MB photo of each side. I can usually see as much as through a microscope, just because I'm not used to seeing the micro photos....I'm pretty sure the top guys here are used to seeing them and can understand the metal movement much better than I can.
             
            Wouldn't it be great if the US mint would manufacture something like described as a possibility of this coins creation so we would have access to high resolution examples. (I'm talking about not only this type of error, but many).
            We really need a numismatist at the helm over there, concerned with education. Not just someone looking to push overpriced sales items like commemoratives and mint and proof sets. I guess they do things for YN's, but it would be great if they could help coin collectors by taking some of their budget funds towards coin collector educational projects.
            Anyone who has been collecting for years has seen previous theories proved wrong, and as a result, anything that used those particular theories as a "Given" lost their validity.
             
            I'm going to start a new thread with this thought in mind. Thanks again MIke. Steve


            --- On Sun, 3/27/11, Mike Diamond <mdia1@...> wrote:

            From: Mike Diamond <mdia1@...>
            Subject: [Error Coin Information Exchange] Re: Error quiz -- figure this one out.
            To: errorcoininformationexchange@yahoogroups.com
            Date: Sunday, March 27, 2011, 11:11 AM

             
            Finding common die markers on both faces would prove that it's a pseudo-mule, but few die markers will survive the crushing impact on the flattened face. Add to that the possibility of the texture of the planchet (tumbling marks, etc.) being transferred to the flattened face.

            Finding a different set of die markers on the two faces wouldn't necessarily invalidate the pseudo-mule scenario because a coin can end up (or be placed) in a different press for the second strike.

            --- In errorcoininformationexchange@yahoogroups.com, Steve Frank <taxi_steve929@...> wrote:
            >
            > I agree with your assessment from the photo, with the bottom photo looking like the first strike that later had a blank placed between it and the obverse die which caused the flattening. I'd bet a dollar to a doughnut that you find something unique to this reverse die present on both reverses once you break out the magnifying glass or if need be, microscope. I wonder if John Kraljevich got to see this one when he was at ANR....I usually talk colonials with him, but would be nice to see if he got to see both sides blown up for comparison.
            >  
            > One question.....when I hear "Midnight Special", I think of Wolfman Jack and the TV Show, and next the song.....not familiar with it being used in this context....but assume it refers to a shady deal or something?
            >  
            > Thanks for posting!!
            >  
            >          Steve Frank
            >  
            >  
            > --- On Sun, 3/27/11, Mike Diamond <mdia1@...> wrote:
            >
            >
            > From: Mike Diamond <mdia1@...>
            > Subject: [Error Coin Information Exchange] Re: Error quiz -- figure this one out.
            > To: errorcoininformationexchange@yahoogroups.com
            > Date: Sunday, March 27, 2011, 9:46 AM
            >
            >
            >  
            >
            >
            >
            > Yeah, this one:
            >
            > http://coins.ha.com/common/view_item.php?Sale_No=414&Lot_No=5810&type=top10-coinnews-tem100910
            >
            > While it could be what NGC says it is, its appearance is equally consistent with it being a two-tailed pseudo-mule. All it takes is an initial in-collar uniface strike (obverse left blank). Then it flips over and receives a second in-collar uniface strike that squashes the original reverse design. This could occur accidentally (unlikely) or intentionally.
            >
            > There are at least two other routes to creating a pseudo-mule.
            >
            > If a pseudo-mule is struck out-of-collar, it will look like a two-headed or two-tailed die cap. These types of errors do occur naturally.
            >
            > On ebay there's now a double-obverse pseudo-mule Malaysian 1 sen coin paired with a double-reverse actual mule 1 sen. The die neck of the obverse die was probably too short to use it for an actual mule, so a little bit of trickery was employed. Both coins are, of course, midnight specials.
            >
            > --- In errorcoininformationexchange@yahoogroups.com, "Travis" <travisbolton543@> wrote:
            > >
            > > I'm going to guess you are talking about the Washington quarter with eagle reverses on both sides?
            > >
            > > --- In errorcoininformationexchange@yahoogroups.com, "Mike Diamond" <mdia1@> wrote:
            > > >
            > > > I have to confess that I did buy it and in doing so, probably overpaid by at least $150. But I figured it would make for a good Collector's Clearinghouse column. A number of pseudo-mules (full, centered ones) have been slabbed by top tier grading services as true two-headed or two-tailed mules. One probable example sold for $42,000.
            > > >
            > > > --- In errorcoininformationexchange@yahoogroups.com, Rob Risi <rjrisi@> wrote:
            > > > >
            > > > > were you the winner Mike D?
            > > >
            > >
            >

          • Mike Diamond
            I haven t had the opportunity to inspect the two-tailed quarter up close. I m going by the photos and my experience with similar-looking coins that happen to
            Message 5 of 17 , Mar 27, 2011
            • 0 Attachment
              I haven't had the opportunity to inspect the two-tailed quarter up close. I'm going by the photos and my experience with similar-looking coins that happen to be pseudo-mules. Although a pseudo-mule scenario is consistent with the coin's appearance, I cannot present this scenario as anything more than an alternative hypothesis.

              I'm not sure a close-up exam would resolve the question. Even in the case of the Malaysian double-obverse pseudo-mule, I cannot say with absolute, metaphysical certainty that it's not a true mule. All I can say is that all the double-obverse Malaysian 1 sen mules look like this (one face flattened) and there is no reason that they should look like this unless they're pseudo-mules.

              Similarly, I can't say with absolute, metaphysical certainty that the triple-struck error nickel that started this thread didn't receive a second, off-center strike from two obverse dies in an adjacent striking chamber, one employed as the hammer die and one employed by the anvil die. But how likely is that? There is only one bona fide case of a coin struck by two obverse (hammer) dies -- an 1859 Indian cent. Using Occam's Razor, one must embrace the simpler, more prosaic scenario.

              --- In errorcoininformationexchange@yahoogroups.com, Steve Frank <taxi_steve929@...> wrote:
              >
              > I understand, and look forward to any new info you can post on this one. I assume you or someone you highly regard examined this in hand. I would love to see a 10MB photo of each side. I can usually see as much as through a microscope, just because I'm not used to seeing the micro photos....I'm pretty sure the top guys here are used to seeing them and can understand the metal movement much better than I can.
              >  
              > Wouldn't it be great if the US mint would manufacture something like described as a possibility of this coins creation so we would have access to high resolution examples. (I'm talking about not only this type of error, but many).
              > We really need a numismatist at the helm over there, concerned with education. Not just someone looking to push overpriced sales items like commemoratives and mint and proof sets. I guess they do things for YN's, but it would be great if they could help coin collectors by taking some of their budget funds towards coin collector educational projects.
              > Anyone who has been collecting for years has seen previous theories proved wrong, and as a result, anything that used those particular theories as a "Given" lost their validity.
              >  
              > I'm going to start a new thread with this thought in mind. Thanks again MIke. Steve
              >
              >
              > --- On Sun, 3/27/11, Mike Diamond <mdia1@...> wrote:
              >
              >
              > From: Mike Diamond <mdia1@...>
              > Subject: [Error Coin Information Exchange] Re: Error quiz -- figure this one out.
              > To: errorcoininformationexchange@yahoogroups.com
              > Date: Sunday, March 27, 2011, 11:11 AM
              >
              >
              >  
              >
              >
              >
              > Finding common die markers on both faces would prove that it's a pseudo-mule, but few die markers will survive the crushing impact on the flattened face. Add to that the possibility of the texture of the planchet (tumbling marks, etc.) being transferred to the flattened face.
              >
              > Finding a different set of die markers on the two faces wouldn't necessarily invalidate the pseudo-mule scenario because a coin can end up (or be placed) in a different press for the second strike.
              >
              > --- In errorcoininformationexchange@yahoogroups.com, Steve Frank <taxi_steve929@> wrote:
              > >
              > > I agree with your assessment from the photo, with the bottom photo looking like the first strike that later had a blank placed between it and the obverse die which caused the flattening. I'd bet a dollar to a doughnut that you find something unique to this reverse die present on both reverses once you break out the magnifying glass or if need be, microscope. I wonder if John Kraljevich got to see this one when he was at ANR....I usually talk colonials with him, but would be nice to see if he got to see both sides blown up for comparison.
              > >  
              > > One question.....when I hear "Midnight Special", I think of Wolfman Jack and the TV Show, and next the song.....not familiar with it being used in this context....but assume it refers to a shady deal or something?
              > >  
              > > Thanks for posting!!
              > >  
              > >          Steve Frank
              > >  
              > >  
              > > --- On Sun, 3/27/11, Mike Diamond <mdia1@> wrote:
              > >
              > >
              > > From: Mike Diamond <mdia1@>
              > > Subject: [Error Coin Information Exchange] Re: Error quiz -- figure this one out.
              > > To: errorcoininformationexchange@yahoogroups.com
              > > Date: Sunday, March 27, 2011, 9:46 AM
              > >
              > >
              > >  
              > >
              > >
              > >
              > > Yeah, this one:
              > >
              > > http://coins.ha.com/common/view_item.php?Sale_No=414&Lot_No=5810&type=top10-coinnews-tem100910
              > >
              > > While it could be what NGC says it is, its appearance is equally consistent with it being a two-tailed pseudo-mule. All it takes is an initial in-collar uniface strike (obverse left blank). Then it flips over and receives a second in-collar uniface strike that squashes the original reverse design. This could occur accidentally (unlikely) or intentionally.
              > >
              > > There are at least two other routes to creating a pseudo-mule.
              > >
              > > If a pseudo-mule is struck out-of-collar, it will look like a two-headed or two-tailed die cap. These types of errors do occur naturally.
              > >
              > > On ebay there's now a double-obverse pseudo-mule Malaysian 1 sen coin paired with a double-reverse actual mule 1 sen. The die neck of the obverse die was probably too short to use it for an actual mule, so a little bit of trickery was employed. Both coins are, of course, midnight specials.
              > >
              > > --- In errorcoininformationexchange@yahoogroups.com, "Travis" <travisbolton543@> wrote:
              > > >
              > > > I'm going to guess you are talking about the Washington quarter with eagle reverses on both sides?
              > > >
              > > > --- In errorcoininformationexchange@yahoogroups.com, "Mike Diamond" <mdia1@> wrote:
              > > > >
              > > > > I have to confess that I did buy it and in doing so, probably overpaid by at least $150. But I figured it would make for a good Collector's Clearinghouse column. A number of pseudo-mules (full, centered ones) have been slabbed by top tier grading services as true two-headed or two-tailed mules. One probable example sold for $42,000.
              > > > >
              > > > > --- In errorcoininformationexchange@yahoogroups.com, Rob Risi <rjrisi@> wrote:
              > > > > >
              > > > > > were you the winner Mike D?
              > > > >
              > > >
              > >
              >
            • Travis
              The description on the label of this two-tailed quarter definitely supports your theory of a pseudo-mule. I personally agree with you Mike about the coin,
              Message 6 of 17 , Mar 27, 2011
              • 0 Attachment
                The description on the label of this two-tailed quarter definitely supports your theory of a pseudo-mule. I personally agree with you Mike about the coin, which is why I had a feeling this was the coin you were talking about.

                --- In errorcoininformationexchange@yahoogroups.com, "Mike Diamond" <mdia1@...> wrote:
                >
                > I haven't had the opportunity to inspect the two-tailed quarter up close. I'm going by the photos and my experience with similar-looking coins that happen to be pseudo-mules. Although a pseudo-mule scenario is consistent with the coin's appearance, I cannot present this scenario as anything more than an alternative hypothesis.
                >
                > I'm not sure a close-up exam would resolve the question. Even in the case of the Malaysian double-obverse pseudo-mule, I cannot say with absolute, metaphysical certainty that it's not a true mule. All I can say is that all the double-obverse Malaysian 1 sen mules look like this (one face flattened) and there is no reason that they should look like this unless they're pseudo-mules.
                >
                > Similarly, I can't say with absolute, metaphysical certainty that the triple-struck error nickel that started this thread didn't receive a second, off-center strike from two obverse dies in an adjacent striking chamber, one employed as the hammer die and one employed by the anvil die. But how likely is that? There is only one bona fide case of a coin struck by two obverse (hammer) dies -- an 1859 Indian cent. Using Occam's Razor, one must embrace the simpler, more prosaic scenario.
                >
                > --- In errorcoininformationexchange@yahoogroups.com, Steve Frank <taxi_steve929@> wrote:
                > >
                > > I understand, and look forward to any new info you can post on this one. I assume you or someone you highly regard examined this in hand. I would love to see a 10MB photo of each side. I can usually see as much as through a microscope, just because I'm not used to seeing the micro photos....I'm pretty sure the top guys here are used to seeing them and can understand the metal movement much better than I can.
                > >  
                > > Wouldn't it be great if the US mint would manufacture something like described as a possibility of this coins creation so we would have access to high resolution examples. (I'm talking about not only this type of error, but many).
                > > We really need a numismatist at the helm over there, concerned with education. Not just someone looking to push overpriced sales items like commemoratives and mint and proof sets. I guess they do things for YN's, but it would be great if they could help coin collectors by taking some of their budget funds towards coin collector educational projects.
                > > Anyone who has been collecting for years has seen previous theories proved wrong, and as a result, anything that used those particular theories as a "Given" lost their validity.
                > >  
                > > I'm going to start a new thread with this thought in mind. Thanks again MIke. Steve
                > >
                > >
                > > --- On Sun, 3/27/11, Mike Diamond <mdia1@> wrote:
                > >
                > >
                > > From: Mike Diamond <mdia1@>
                > > Subject: [Error Coin Information Exchange] Re: Error quiz -- figure this one out.
                > > To: errorcoininformationexchange@yahoogroups.com
                > > Date: Sunday, March 27, 2011, 11:11 AM
                > >
                > >
                > >  
                > >
                > >
                > >
                > > Finding common die markers on both faces would prove that it's a pseudo-mule, but few die markers will survive the crushing impact on the flattened face. Add to that the possibility of the texture of the planchet (tumbling marks, etc.) being transferred to the flattened face.
                > >
                > > Finding a different set of die markers on the two faces wouldn't necessarily invalidate the pseudo-mule scenario because a coin can end up (or be placed) in a different press for the second strike.
                > >
                > > --- In errorcoininformationexchange@yahoogroups.com, Steve Frank <taxi_steve929@> wrote:
                > > >
                > > > I agree with your assessment from the photo, with the bottom photo looking like the first strike that later had a blank placed between it and the obverse die which caused the flattening. I'd bet a dollar to a doughnut that you find something unique to this reverse die present on both reverses once you break out the magnifying glass or if need be, microscope. I wonder if John Kraljevich got to see this one when he was at ANR....I usually talk colonials with him, but would be nice to see if he got to see both sides blown up for comparison.
                > > >  
                > > > One question.....when I hear "Midnight Special", I think of Wolfman Jack and the TV Show, and next the song.....not familiar with it being used in this context....but assume it refers to a shady deal or something?
                > > >  
                > > > Thanks for posting!!
                > > >  
                > > >          Steve Frank
                > > >  
                > > >  
                > > > --- On Sun, 3/27/11, Mike Diamond <mdia1@> wrote:
                > > >
                > > >
                > > > From: Mike Diamond <mdia1@>
                > > > Subject: [Error Coin Information Exchange] Re: Error quiz -- figure this one out.
                > > > To: errorcoininformationexchange@yahoogroups.com
                > > > Date: Sunday, March 27, 2011, 9:46 AM
                > > >
                > > >
                > > >  
                > > >
                > > >
                > > >
                > > > Yeah, this one:
                > > >
                > > > http://coins.ha.com/common/view_item.php?Sale_No=414&Lot_No=5810&type=top10-coinnews-tem100910
                > > >
                > > > While it could be what NGC says it is, its appearance is equally consistent with it being a two-tailed pseudo-mule. All it takes is an initial in-collar uniface strike (obverse left blank). Then it flips over and receives a second in-collar uniface strike that squashes the original reverse design. This could occur accidentally (unlikely) or intentionally.
                > > >
                > > > There are at least two other routes to creating a pseudo-mule.
                > > >
                > > > If a pseudo-mule is struck out-of-collar, it will look like a two-headed or two-tailed die cap. These types of errors do occur naturally.
                > > >
                > > > On ebay there's now a double-obverse pseudo-mule Malaysian 1 sen coin paired with a double-reverse actual mule 1 sen. The die neck of the obverse die was probably too short to use it for an actual mule, so a little bit of trickery was employed. Both coins are, of course, midnight specials.
                > > >
                > > > --- In errorcoininformationexchange@yahoogroups.com, "Travis" <travisbolton543@> wrote:
                > > > >
                > > > > I'm going to guess you are talking about the Washington quarter with eagle reverses on both sides?
                > > > >
                > > > > --- In errorcoininformationexchange@yahoogroups.com, "Mike Diamond" <mdia1@> wrote:
                > > > > >
                > > > > > I have to confess that I did buy it and in doing so, probably overpaid by at least $150. But I figured it would make for a good Collector's Clearinghouse column. A number of pseudo-mules (full, centered ones) have been slabbed by top tier grading services as true two-headed or two-tailed mules. One probable example sold for $42,000.
                > > > > >
                > > > > > --- In errorcoininformationexchange@yahoogroups.com, Rob Risi <rjrisi@> wrote:
                > > > > > >
                > > > > > > were you the winner Mike D?
                > > > > >
                > > > >
                > > >
                > >
                >
              Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.