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Re: [Error Coin Information Exchange] Re: What kind of error is this one???

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  • taxi_steve929@yahoo.com
    Dies bulge and sink. Unfortunately, I guess modern counterfeiters dies will too. This is a great site. I d be fooled on most. I skepticism is the way to go for
    Message 1 of 5 , Jan 14, 2011
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      Dies bulge and sink. Unfortunately, I guess modern counterfeiters dies will too. This is a great site. I'd be fooled on most. I skepticism is the way to go for someone uneducated in these like I am.

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      From: "bigdcoins" <bigdcoins@...>
      Sender: errorcoininformationexchange@yahoogroups.com
      Date: Fri, 14 Jan 2011 19:00:30 -0000
      To: <errorcoininformationexchange@yahoogroups.com>
      ReplyTo: errorcoininformationexchange@yahoogroups.com
      Subject: [Error Coin Information Exchange] Re: What kind of error is this one???

       

      Yeah I figured as much. just didn't make sence with the flatened reverse. I picked up a few cheap I thought were man made. I have another nickel that is under size (diameter), under weight,, and has mushy detail but the weirdest thing is the reverse is very convex. Curves right down almost to a point at the rims. So instead of the rim being squared off,,,, the edge is almost sharp (pointed). I will post some pix in a few days. Thanks for the input. bigd

      --- In errorcoininformationexchange@yahoogroups.com, Steve Frank <taxi_steve929@...> wrote:
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      > Hi Mike. That makes sense since the fresh planchet wouldn't be strike hardened and shouldn't flatten the surfaces like this. I do have access to examples where a blank was intentionally used to create odd multistrikes on contemporary counterfeits, and of course the blank would then become a brockage. On some of these old creations, if you figure what the other coin or coins looked like, it's often difficult to figure out if the coin you have was used to create an oddity or is the oddity. The link below leaves no doubt that this was the creation and not used to create something more spectacular. I remember wanting it very much, and was turned down. It was then traded for a 1785 counterfeit halfpenny, and Mike Ringo wound up with this. He was a hell of a cherry picker, but for his personal collection seemed more concerned with the bizarre than the value, and I believe this sold for around 3K after he died and the 1785 is valued at closer to 10K. Mike got
      > the worst of it financially on the trade, but I really don't think he was about money and would have kept this just the same.
      >  
      > http://www.cointalk.com/t120735/
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      > --- On Fri, 1/14/11, Mike Diamond <mdia1@...> wrote:
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      > From: Mike Diamond <mdia1@...>
      > Subject: [Error Coin Information Exchange] Re: What kind of error is this one???
      > To: errorcoininformationexchange@yahoogroups.com
      > Date: Friday, January 14, 2011, 11:01 AM
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      >  
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      > Unfortunately, your "multi-struck" nickel is a fake. The obverse was struck several times by a fake die while the reverse face rested on a hard flat surface.
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      > --- In errorcoininformationexchange@yahoogroups.com, "bigdcoins" <bigdcoins@> wrote:
      > >
      > > Hey first of all,,,,nice article on the partial brockages., Neat examples that put the mind to work.
      > > Now for anyone out there I need some help deciphering ?? this coin.
      > > Not a typical multistrike. How many strikes on this one??? and what would you call it, and,, sequence of events.
      > > Note the reverse.... In person looks extremely flat. Was it struck and possibly a blank planchet covered the reverse giveing it this effect or what gives. It is the last 8 photos in the default album. Any help would be appreciated. bigd
      > >
      >

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