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Re: [Error Coin Information Exchange] Re: A strike-through, yes. But what ki...

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  • Michael Evanchik
    i actually have a beautiful double struck quarter on ebay right now.no dropped letters but it has a nice example of the repetative strike though.in this
    Message 1 of 3 , Jul 22 3:33 PM
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      i actually have a beautiful double struck quarter on ebay right now.no dropped letters but it has a nice example of the repetative strike though.in this example,1st strike is on center and has a blobby strike through area in the feild behind georges head.the 2nd strike is about 40-50% off at about 6:00 and has the same strike through area with much of the offending goop still retained.very interesting.i just got it from travis a few months ago then switched to only collecting lincoln cent errors.i dont know if i can adn dont want to advertise my own auction,so unless mike says its ok,youll have to go find it.seller id is ivan0000013.best regards,mike e.

      --- On Thu, 7/22/10, Mike Diamond <mdia1@...> wrote:

      From: Mike Diamond <mdia1@...>
      Subject: [Error Coin Information Exchange] Re: A strike-through, yes. But what ki...
      To: errorcoininformationexchange@yahoogroups.com
      Date: Thursday, July 22, 2010, 3:24 PM

       
      Repetitive strike-through errors are, of course, well-documented. This includes both repetitive "grease strikes" and repetitive strikes through a piece of debris (metallic, plastic, etc.) that sticks to a die. It's just that I've never seen a repeat in the case of this particular type of strike-through error (dropped filling). But I wouldn't be surprised if one eventually turns up, especially one with a large surface area. An expansive dropped filling would have the right sort of shape to embed itself anew in the recesses of the die.

      --- In errorcoininformationexchange@yahoogroups.com, innff@... wrote:
      >
      > I have not seen an repetitious drooped fillings . Logically, I would think
      > that a dropped filling has a life expectancy of just one strike.
      >
      >
      > In a message dated 7/22/2010 1:07:56 P.M. Eastern Daylight Time,
      > mdia1@... writes:
      >
      >
      >
      >
      > It's theoretically possible for the same dropped filling impression to
      > appear on a succession of coins, provided the filling sticks to the die face.
      > However, I've never seen this happen. Every dropped filling I've encountered
      > so far has been a one-off event.
      >
      > Have any members of ECIE encountered a repetitive dropped filling
      > impression?
      >
      > --- In _errorcoininformationexchange@yahoogroups.com_
      > (mailto:errorcoininformationexchange@yahoogroups.com) , jeff ylitalo <jylitalo@> wrote:
      > >
      > > That is surely good news, then.
      > > Â
      > > I assume a dropped filing is just that. There can only be one of the
      > same which you have, correct?
      > > Â
      > >
      > >
      > > --- On Thu, 7/22/10, Mike Diamond <mdia1@> wrote:
      > >
      > >
      > > From: Mike Diamond <mdia1@>
      > > Subject: [Error Coin Information Exchange] Re: A strike-through, yes.
      > But what kind...?
      > > To: _errorcoininformationexchange@yahoogroups.com_
      > (mailto:errorcoininformationexchange@yahoogroups.com)
      > > Date: Thursday, July 22, 2010, 11:22 AM
      > >
      > >
      > > Â
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > > I just noticed that there's a tiny bit of black die fill still embedded
      > in the upper left corner of the ribbon impression. Final confirmation of
      > the diagnosis.
      > >
      > > --- In _errorcoininformationexchange@yahoogroups.com_
      > (mailto:errorcoininformationexchange@yahoogroups.com) , "Mike Diamond" <mdia1@> wrote:
      > > >
      > > > I now have the coin and can confirm that it's dropped filling. It's
      > amazing that it held together after falling out of the die because there
      > truly is no broader area of die fill maintaining its integrity.
      > > >
      > > > --- In _errorcoininformationexchange@yahoogroups.com_
      > (mailto:errorcoininformationexchange@yahoogroups.com) , "Mike Diamond" <mdia1@> wrote:
      > > > >
      > > > > I just heard from the seller and she confirms that the letters TION
      > are raised relative to the surrounding incuse ribbon. That strengthens my
      > conviction that the dropped filling acted as a stencil through which coin
      > metal extruded, forming the raised letters. Most unusual. This will
      > definitely make for an interesting Collector's Clearinghouse column.
      > > > >
      > > > > --- In _errorcoininformationexchange@yahoogroups.com_
      > (mailto:errorcoininformationexchange@yahoogroups.com) , "Mike Diamond" <mdia1@> wrote:
      > > > > >
      > > > > > I communicated with Fred and he agrees that the evidence available
      > in the photos supports the dropped filling diagnosis. But as I told Fred,
      > it is a very peculiar case. Every dropped filling I've seen this large has
      > always been embedded in a larger flake, the latter generating a surrounding
      > shallow sunken field. A good example of this is the New Hampshire quarter
      > I reported on in Coin World. The borders of the incuse design in this
      > Georgia quarter are clean. And the outline is so incredibly clear and the
      > impression is so deep.
      > > > > >
      > > > > > I will provide a fuller report upon its arrival. Maybe, just
      > maybe, I'm dealing with a phenomenon outside my experience.
      > > > > >
      > > > > > --- In _errorcoininformationexchange@yahoogroups.com_ (m
      > ailto:errorcoininformationexchange@yahoogroups.com) , "Mike Diamond" <mdia1@> wrote:
      > > > > > >
      > > > > > > I captured the photos and e-mailed them to you, Fred.
      > > > > > >
      > > > > > > --- In _errorcoininformationexchange@yahoogroups.com_
      > (mailto:errorcoininformationexchange@yahoogroups.com) , fred_weinberg <no_reply@>
      > wrote:
      > > > > > > >
      > > > > > > > Mike, I've tried three diff. ways to view
      > > > > > > > the scan of the Georgia Quarter, but I just
      > > > > > > > get a spinning wheel, and then 'image not available'.
      > > > > > > >
      > > > > > > > I'll keep trying during the morning, and see if
      > > > > > > > it shows up on my screen; then I'll post.
      > > > > > > >
      > > > > > > > Fred
      > > > > > > >
      > > > > > > > --- In _errorcoininformationexchange@yahoogroups.com_
      > (mailto:errorcoininformationexchange@yahoogroups.com) , "Mike Diamond" <mdia1@>
      > wrote:
      > > > > > > > >
      > > > > > > > >
      > > > > > > > > I don't know why PCGS affixed such a non-specific and
      > uninformative
      > > > > > > > > label to this remarkably clear impression:
      > > > > > > > >
      > > > > > > > >
      > _http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&item=350317329043_ (http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&item=350317329043)
      > > > > > > > >
      > <_http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&item=350317329043_ (http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&item=350317329043) >
      > > > > > > > >
      > > > > > > > > I strongly suspect that it's a dropped filling. The absence
      > of a
      > > > > > > > > surrounding, sunken zone would seem to argue against this
      > Georgia
      > > > > > > > > quarter having been struck through a thin, previously-struck
      > piece of
      > > > > > > > > metal. While most dropped fillings are a bit mushy along the
      > edges,
      > > > > > > > > some are quite crisp. Also supporting the dropped filling
      > hypothesis is
      > > > > > > > > the fact that the depth of the impression is variable and
      > some of the
      > > > > > > > > elements are incomplete.
      > > > > > > > >
      > > > > > > > > Even if this is a dropped filling, it's quite an unusual
      > one. It's
      > > > > > > > > remarkable that the die fill that fell out of the stem
      > survived, since
      > > > > > > > > it was so long and fragile. The die fill that occupied the
      > ribbon must
      > > > > > > > > have surrounded the letters that are raised on the die face
      > and that
      > > > > > > > > produce the incuse letters on the coin. For these to fall
      > out and
      > > > > > > > > survive in the form of a stencil is also remarkable.
      > > > > > > > >
      > > > > > > > > I've e-mailed the seller and asked whether the letters TION
      > are raised
      > > > > > > > > relative to the sunken impression of the ribbon, or whether
      > they are
      > > > > > > > > even more deeply recessed than the ribbon impression. If
      > they're
      > > > > > > > > raised, this would support the presence of a die fill
      > "stencil".
      > > > > > > > >
      > > > > > > >
      > > > > > >
      > > > > >
      > > > >
      > > >
      > >
      >


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