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Re: A strike-through, yes. But what kind...?

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  • Mike Diamond
    It s theoretically possible for the same dropped filling impression to appear on a succession of coins, provided the filling sticks to the die face. However,
    Message 1 of 16 , Jul 22, 2010
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      It's theoretically possible for the same dropped filling impression to appear on a succession of coins, provided the filling sticks to the die face. However, I've never seen this happen. Every dropped filling I've encountered so far has been a one-off event.

      Have any members of ECIE encountered a repetitive dropped filling impression?

      --- In errorcoininformationexchange@yahoogroups.com, jeff ylitalo <jylitalo@...> wrote:
      >
      > That is surely good news, then.
      >  
      > I assume a dropped filing is just that. There can only be one of the same which you have, correct?
      >  
      >
      >
      > --- On Thu, 7/22/10, Mike Diamond <mdia1@...> wrote:
      >
      >
      > From: Mike Diamond <mdia1@...>
      > Subject: [Error Coin Information Exchange] Re: A strike-through, yes. But what kind...?
      > To: errorcoininformationexchange@yahoogroups.com
      > Date: Thursday, July 22, 2010, 11:22 AM
      >
      >
      >  
      >
      >
      >
      > I just noticed that there's a tiny bit of black die fill still embedded in the upper left corner of the ribbon impression. Final confirmation of the diagnosis.
      >
      > --- In errorcoininformationexchange@yahoogroups.com, "Mike Diamond" <mdia1@> wrote:
      > >
      > > I now have the coin and can confirm that it's dropped filling. It's amazing that it held together after falling out of the die because there truly is no broader area of die fill maintaining its integrity.
      > >
      > > --- In errorcoininformationexchange@yahoogroups.com, "Mike Diamond" <mdia1@> wrote:
      > > >
      > > > I just heard from the seller and she confirms that the letters TION are raised relative to the surrounding incuse ribbon. That strengthens my conviction that the dropped filling acted as a stencil through which coin metal extruded, forming the raised letters. Most unusual. This will definitely make for an interesting Collector's Clearinghouse column.
      > > >
      > > > --- In errorcoininformationexchange@yahoogroups.com, "Mike Diamond" <mdia1@> wrote:
      > > > >
      > > > > I communicated with Fred and he agrees that the evidence available in the photos supports the dropped filling diagnosis. But as I told Fred, it is a very peculiar case. Every dropped filling I've seen this large has always been embedded in a larger flake, the latter generating a surrounding shallow sunken field. A good example of this is the New Hampshire quarter I reported on in Coin World. The borders of the incuse design in this Georgia quarter are clean. And the outline is so incredibly clear and the impression is so deep.
      > > > >
      > > > > I will provide a fuller report upon its arrival. Maybe, just maybe, I'm dealing with a phenomenon outside my experience.
      > > > >
      > > > > --- In errorcoininformationexchange@yahoogroups.com, "Mike Diamond" <mdia1@> wrote:
      > > > > >
      > > > > > I captured the photos and e-mailed them to you, Fred.
      > > > > >
      > > > > > --- In errorcoininformationexchange@yahoogroups.com, fred_weinberg <no_reply@> wrote:
      > > > > > >
      > > > > > > Mike, I've tried three diff. ways to view
      > > > > > > the scan of the Georgia Quarter, but I just
      > > > > > > get a spinning wheel, and then 'image not available'.
      > > > > > >
      > > > > > > I'll keep trying during the morning, and see if
      > > > > > > it shows up on my screen; then I'll post.
      > > > > > >
      > > > > > > Fred
      > > > > > >
      > > > > > > --- In errorcoininformationexchange@yahoogroups.com, "Mike Diamond" <mdia1@> wrote:
      > > > > > > >
      > > > > > > >
      > > > > > > > I don't know why PCGS affixed such a non-specific and uninformative
      > > > > > > > label to this remarkably clear impression:
      > > > > > > >
      > > > > > > > http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&item=350317329043
      > > > > > > > <http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&item=350317329043>
      > > > > > > >
      > > > > > > > I strongly suspect that it's a dropped filling. The absence of a
      > > > > > > > surrounding, sunken zone would seem to argue against this Georgia
      > > > > > > > quarter having been struck through a thin, previously-struck piece of
      > > > > > > > metal. While most dropped fillings are a bit mushy along the edges,
      > > > > > > > some are quite crisp. Also supporting the dropped filling hypothesis is
      > > > > > > > the fact that the depth of the impression is variable and some of the
      > > > > > > > elements are incomplete.
      > > > > > > >
      > > > > > > > Even if this is a dropped filling, it's quite an unusual one. It's
      > > > > > > > remarkable that the die fill that fell out of the stem survived, since
      > > > > > > > it was so long and fragile. The die fill that occupied the ribbon must
      > > > > > > > have surrounded the letters that are raised on the die face and that
      > > > > > > > produce the incuse letters on the coin. For these to fall out and
      > > > > > > > survive in the form of a stencil is also remarkable.
      > > > > > > >
      > > > > > > > I've e-mailed the seller and asked whether the letters TION are raised
      > > > > > > > relative to the sunken impression of the ribbon, or whether they are
      > > > > > > > even more deeply recessed than the ribbon impression. If they're
      > > > > > > > raised, this would support the presence of a die fill "stencil".
      > > > > > > >
      > > > > > >
      > > > > >
      > > > >
      > > >
      > >
      >
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