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1775 British 1/2d Brockage

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  • Steve Frank
    Attached is a contemporary counterfeit British halfpenny brockage error. It is almost certainly 1775. The heavily produced Young Head family (Open G branch),
    Message 1 of 1 , Jun 10, 2010
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    Attached is a contemporary counterfeit British halfpenny brockage error. It is almost certainly 1775. The heavily produced Young Head family (Open G branch), is made up almost entirely of 1775 dated counterfeits, and the matching obverse I found is paired with a 1775 reverse....but since these were mix and matched being counterfeits, you can not be 100% certain.
     
    Errors within this family are not particulary uncommon, but I've noticed that reverse brockages are more common than obverse. Why this would be true?? Maybe someone here has a theory...would it be the way the dies are set up?? The hammer and anvil dies for making counterfeits were not always set up the same, and the obverse and reverse could be in either position.
     
    This particular obverse was labeld Goiter because of the die breaks effect on George's neck, and it really comes out well on the brockage. I've also loaded a matching normal strike so you can see what the reverse style of this variety should look like.
     
    Kill 2 birds with one stone....below is a link someone posted to another group I belong to on Minting Technology some here will find interesting.
     
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