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Re: Punched Steel Strip

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  • Mike Diamond
    Is it your assumption that this strip was used in the production of steel cent planchets? Such assumptions need to be tested. Does the thickness match that
    Message 1 of 8 , Feb 21, 2010
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      Is it your assumption that this strip was used in the production of steel cent planchets? Such assumptions need to be tested. Does the thickness match that of a cent blank (or the center of a cent planchet)? Does the diameter of the hole match that of a cent blank? Does the zinc coating match the color and appearance of a steel cent?

      I am always suspicious of purported steel cent strip.

      --- In errorcoininformationexchange@yahoogroups.com, "Marc" <numismistake@...> wrote:
      >
      > I found this forgotten piece of punched steel strip I bought from Len's #51 (5/98, lot. 284, "Steel planchet strip 3-3/4" by 2" original nice example). (It's really 3-3/4 X 2-3/4). It was only $12.50 back then, and I haven't looked at it in a very long time. I remember the red paint markings around the rev. edge of the strip. I now noticed the number on the edge of the strip, and it appears to be 'hilighted' by red paint that was used on this side only. Does anyone know anything about this paint or the number?
      >
      > (I've uploades 3 pix to the default album, the rev, close-up of number, and the obv.)
      >
    • Marc
      The punched planchet dimensions: thickness is 1.2mm, hole diameter 18.5mm and 18.6mm in different holes (poss. extending shear?), and the color is an even
      Message 2 of 8 , Feb 22, 2010
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        The punched planchet dimensions: thickness is 1.2mm, hole diameter 18.5mm and 18.6mm in different holes (poss. extending shear?), and the color is an even toned ash-white-grey. The red paint might be a thin colored pencil or marker. It's not wax-like nor thick.

        I measured a T-I CuZn blank I have, and the dimensions match up: 1.2mm and 18.6mm. (A T-II planchet is 1.3 and 18.5).

        The color seems right too, but I don't have an unc. toned war cent in my collection to compare it to.

        The leading edge opposite the number is machine cut (beveled), and the edges around otherwise are factory square.

        Aside from a SG test, I don't know how to authenticate it. But I read/heard once long ago that the mint had dumped tons of mint scrap into SF bay(?), and others came later to collect it. Some was replated. I was also told that Len had a lot of mint scrap. Does anyone know this story?
      • Mike Diamond
        Since the dimensions are consistent with genuine steel cent strip, the most straightforward conclusion is that it IS steel cent strip.
        Message 3 of 8 , Feb 22, 2010
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          Since the dimensions are consistent with genuine steel cent strip, the most straightforward conclusion is that it IS steel cent strip.

          --- In errorcoininformationexchange@yahoogroups.com, "Marc" <numismistake@...> wrote:
          >
          > The punched planchet dimensions: thickness is 1.2mm, hole diameter 18.5mm and 18.6mm in different holes (poss. extending shear?), and the color is an even toned ash-white-grey. The red paint might be a thin colored pencil or marker. It's not wax-like nor thick.
          >
          > I measured a T-I CuZn blank I have, and the dimensions match up: 1.2mm and 18.6mm. (A T-II planchet is 1.3 and 18.5).
          >
          > The color seems right too, but I don't have an unc. toned war cent in my collection to compare it to.
          >
          > The leading edge opposite the number is machine cut (beveled), and the edges around otherwise are factory square.
          >
          > Aside from a SG test, I don't know how to authenticate it. But I read/heard once long ago that the mint had dumped tons of mint scrap into SF bay(?), and others came later to collect it. Some was replated. I was also told that Len had a lot of mint scrap. Does anyone know this story?
          >
        • Travis
          I don t remember who told me this story (different that Marc s), but supposedly a bunch of steel cent strip was found in an old man s garden being used as
          Message 4 of 8 , Feb 22, 2010
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            I don't remember who told me this story (different that Marc's), but supposedly a bunch of steel cent strip was found in an old man's garden being used as chicken-wire. I swear I remember someone told me this... as crazy as it sounds.

            --- In errorcoininformationexchange@yahoogroups.com, "Mike Diamond" <mdia1@...> wrote:
            >
            > Since the dimensions are consistent with genuine steel cent strip, the most straightforward conclusion is that it IS steel cent strip.
            >
            > --- In errorcoininformationexchange@yahoogroups.com, "Marc" <numismistake@> wrote:
            > >
            > > The punched planchet dimensions: thickness is 1.2mm, hole diameter 18.5mm and 18.6mm in different holes (poss. extending shear?), and the color is an even toned ash-white-grey. The red paint might be a thin colored pencil or marker. It's not wax-like nor thick.
            > >
            > > I measured a T-I CuZn blank I have, and the dimensions match up: 1.2mm and 18.6mm. (A T-II planchet is 1.3 and 18.5).
            > >
            > > The color seems right too, but I don't have an unc. toned war cent in my collection to compare it to.
            > >
            > > The leading edge opposite the number is machine cut (beveled), and the edges around otherwise are factory square.
            > >
            > > Aside from a SG test, I don't know how to authenticate it. But I read/heard once long ago that the mint had dumped tons of mint scrap into SF bay(?), and others came later to collect it. Some was replated. I was also told that Len had a lot of mint scrap. Does anyone know this story?
            > >
            >
          • Rob Risi
            Just curious if anyone here is planning on going to the ANA summer seminar in colorado springs this summer? Rob ... From: Travis
            Message 5 of 8 , Feb 22, 2010
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              Just curious if anyone here is planning on going to the ANA summer seminar in colorado springs this summer?
              Rob

              --- On Mon, 2/22/10, Travis <travisbolton543@...> wrote:

              From: Travis <travisbolton543@...>
              Subject: [Error Coin Information Exchange] Re: Punched Steel Strip
              To: errorcoininformationexchange@yahoogroups.com
              Date: Monday, February 22, 2010, 8:26 PM

               
              I don't remember who told me this story (different that Marc's), but supposedly a bunch of steel cent strip was found in an old man's garden being used as chicken-wire. I swear I remember someone told me this... as crazy as it sounds.

              --- In errorcoininformatio nexchange@ yahoogroups. com, "Mike Diamond" <mdia1@...> wrote:
              >
              > Since the dimensions are consistent with genuine steel cent strip, the most straightforward conclusion is that it IS steel cent strip.
              >
              > --- In errorcoininformatio nexchange@ yahoogroups. com, "Marc" <numismistake@ > wrote:
              > >
              > > The punched planchet dimensions: thickness is 1.2mm, hole diameter 18.5mm and 18.6mm in different holes (poss. extending shear?), and the color is an even toned ash-white-grey. The red paint might be a thin colored pencil or marker. It's not wax-like nor thick.
              > >
              > > I measured a T-I CuZn blank I have, and the dimensions match up: 1.2mm and 18.6mm. (A T-II planchet is 1.3 and 18.5).
              > >
              > > The color seems right too, but I don't have an unc. toned war cent in my collection to compare it to.
              > >
              > > The leading edge opposite the number is machine cut (beveled), and the edges around otherwise are factory square.
              > >
              > > Aside from a SG test, I don't know how to authenticate it. But I read/heard once long ago that the mint had dumped tons of mint scrap into SF bay(?), and others came later to collect it. Some was replated. I was also told that Len had a lot of mint scrap. Does anyone know this story?
              > >
              >


            • Marc
              OK then; assuming that this is genuine (even if replated long ago) steel strip. I could imagine where the transitional steel supplied might have been numbered.
              Message 6 of 8 , Feb 23, 2010
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                OK then; assuming that this is genuine (even if replated long ago) steel strip. I could imagine where the transitional steel supplied might have been numbered. That is, possibly accounted for in light of the Cu shortage. Could this be a corner piece, maybe outlined in red and put aside at start-up by mint employees that had to account for/list steel strip used during the war? It would then have been discarded after being accounted for. It might explain the hilighting of the number as production went on. Just a hypothesis. Does anyone have, or every seen any numbered piece of any strip used for US coinage, or know anything about this?
              • fred_weinberg
                The source of most of the 1943 Steel Cent Planchet Strips was Gary Young, who ran a coin shop with his father, Leo Young, in Oakland, Calif. - right across the
                Message 7 of 8 , Feb 23, 2010
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                  The source of most of the 1943 Steel Cent Planchet Strips
                  was Gary Young, who ran a coin shop with his father,
                  Leo Young, in Oakland, Calif. - right across the Bay from
                  San Francisco.

                  Gary told the story (to me, and others) that sometime in
                  the early/mid 1960's, a woman came into the shop with
                  some of the punched planchet strips.

                  Her husband worked at the San Francisco Mint during the
                  War years - after the war, the SF Mint dumped the vast
                  majority of it's punched Steel planchet strips, rejected
                  planchets, etc., into San Francisco Bay. Apparently it
                  wasn't useful or cost effective to melt/reclaim them.

                  Her husband took some of the strips home (they were worthless
                  to the Mint, apparently), and kept them in his garage for
                  the next 15 or so years. After her husband died, she
                  found them, and used them around the outer portions of her
                  garden, to prevent animals from eating the garden plants.

                  At some early point, she either told someone the story, or
                  someone asked about the strange 'chicken wire', and she
                  related it to them. They told her that there might be some
                  value to the strips - so she took them to the coin shop
                  in Oakland (I assume she lived in that general area).....

                  The Strips were all purchased by Gary Young, and they ended
                  up with Ron Gillio, who along with Walter Breen, used them
                  as part of their "Numismatic Education Course" business -
                  selling them in smaller cut-down 4x6 (I don't happen to have
                  one here, so I don't have the exact measurements) strips,
                  with punched numbers on one corner.

                  Somewhere here in my office I have the original flyer/brochure
                  on them...they were later sold thru CW by New England Rare
                  Coin Galleries, and others.

                  I have hanging outside my office door one of the largest
                  1943 Steel Cent Punched Planchet strips left - it's
                  4.5 feet long, and 4 inches wide; somewhat corroded of course.


                  They've been sold over the decades in various manners, and
                  were fairly common at the local Error Coin Clubs and the
                  Error-A-Rama's, here in Southern Calif. from 1967 to the
                  mid-70's. They seem to have been dispursed over the past
                  decades, and now only a few of the smaller pieces come on
                  the market each year.

                  Hope this info helps shed some light on them.

                  Fred

                  --- In errorcoininformationexchange@yahoogroups.com, "Marc" <numismistake@...> wrote:
                  >
                  > OK then; assuming that this is genuine (even if replated long ago) steel strip. I could imagine where the transitional steel supplied might have been numbered. That is, possibly accounted for in light of the Cu shortage. Could this be a corner piece, maybe outlined in red and put aside at start-up by mint employees that had to account for/list steel strip used during the war? It would then have been discarded after being accounted for. It might explain the hilighting of the number as production went on. Just a hypothesis. Does anyone have, or every seen any numbered piece of any strip used for US coinage, or know anything about this?
                  >
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