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Re: [Error Coin Information Exchange] pvc damage

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  • armstrong_aaron
    yep, I ve read online last night that people who have used tap water will later see spotting--sometimes the spotting won t be seen till a year later. The
    Message 1 of 8 , Oct 1, 2009
      yep, I've read online last night that people who have used tap water will later see spotting--sometimes the spotting won't be seen till a year later. The spotting is from contaminants that were in the tap water.

      I've also read it's important to use 100% pure acetone, as most companies add additives to their acetone--if those additives are present, you will also contaminate the surface of your coin.


      --- In errorcoininformationexchange@yahoogroups.com, innff@... wrote:
      >
      > I distrust the water supplies of any city, county or state. There are just
      > to many pollutants in their supplies of water that chorine and filtering
      > cannot remove. Give me the straight acetone bath to remove residue.
      >
      >
      > In a message dated 9/30/2009 4:32:03 P.M. Eastern Daylight Time,
      > darkdesert@... writes:
      >
      >
      >
      >
      > Unfortunately, I found some pvc damage on a few of my coins. Even though I
      > had put them into archival plastic sheets (free of pvc), I guess they must
      > of had slight corrosion but either I failed to notice it, or it got worse
      > and is now noticeable. Why would anyone ever use pvc laden flips?
      >
      > Is it better to remove it by a gentle water wash and pat dry, or to just
      > use pure acetone since it is capable of removing pvc contaminates. Can
      > simply running water over the coin remove enough slime and corrosion to
      > effectively stop the overall corrosion? Or do you have to chemically remove it with
      > acetone?
      >
      > If you can see the slime on the clad coin's edge (copper part), does that
      > mean the coin's surface is ruined?
      >
      > Also, if the coin was in a drawer near other coins, about an inch away,
      > can its corrosive gases permeate and contaminate other nearby coins?
      >
    • armstrong_aaron
      I think if you use acetone, you still need to be wary of what may have been added to acetone. Just because the label says 100% acetone, is it really?
      Message 2 of 8 , Oct 1, 2009
        I think if you use acetone, you still need to be wary of what may have been added to acetone. Just because the label says 100% acetone, is it really?

        http://www.cointalk.com/t57478/

        In this case, a vomit inducing additive was added--in case the acetone was accidently swallowed. It's so bitter, it makes you spit it out.

        Water is nature's most powerful solvent--I think. I am not a chemistry person, but I would assume using distilled water would at least dillute and hopefully remove any traces of the acetone.

        I've also read you should air dry the coins, since pat drying can also damage the surface.


        --- In errorcoininformationexchange@yahoogroups.com, "rccoins" <robert.wilharm@...> wrote:
        >
        > You can use distilled water after the acetone if you choose.
        > Robert Wilharm
        > PO Box 153652
        > Irving, Texas 75015
        > ----- Original Message -----
        > From: <innff@...>
        > To: <errorcoininformationexchange@yahoogroups.com>
        > Sent: Wednesday, September 30, 2009 8:34 PM
        > Subject: Re: [Error Coin Information Exchange] pvc damage
        >
        >
        > >I distrust the water supplies of any city, county or state. There are just
        > > to many pollutants in their supplies of water that chorine and filtering
        > > cannot remove. Give me the straight acetone bath to remove residue.
        > >
        > >
        > > In a message dated 9/30/2009 4:32:03 P.M. Eastern Daylight Time,
        > > darkdesert@... writes:
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > > Unfortunately, I found some pvc damage on a few of my coins. Even though I
        > > had put them into archival plastic sheets (free of pvc), I guess they must
        > > of had slight corrosion but either I failed to notice it, or it got worse
        > > and is now noticeable. Why would anyone ever use pvc laden flips?
        > >
        > > Is it better to remove it by a gentle water wash and pat dry, or to just
        > > use pure acetone since it is capable of removing pvc contaminates. Can
        > > simply running water over the coin remove enough slime and corrosion to
        > > effectively stop the overall corrosion? Or do you have to chemically
        > > remove it with
        > > acetone?
        > >
        > > If you can see the slime on the clad coin's edge (copper part), does that
        > > mean the coin's surface is ruined?
        > >
        > > Also, if the coin was in a drawer near other coins, about an inch away,
        > > can its corrosive gases permeate and contaminate other nearby coins?
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > >
        >
      • Marc
        Acetone should be the drug of choice. Here is a chemical company that will sell you a long term supply that is what we call Reagent Grade, chemically
        Message 3 of 8 , Oct 2, 2009
          Acetone should be the 'drug' of choice. Here is a chemical company that will sell you a long term supply that is what we call Reagent Grade, chemically preservative free and good for doing other chemical reactions withour fear of cross chemical contamination.

          http://secure.sciencecompany.com/Acetone-ACS-Reagent-Grade-16oz-P6659C670.aspx

          Since acetone mixes with water very well, if you'd like, a series of subsequent baths after treatment in distilled water is fine too. Good Luck..Try test pieces first and wait a few days.
        • armstrong_aaron
          I appreciate it Marc. thanks for the help. I also read a post where someone bought acetone from Home Depot and had some type of contamination--he wasn t too
          Message 4 of 8 , Oct 2, 2009
            I appreciate it Marc. thanks for the help. I also read a post where someone bought acetone from Home Depot and had some type of contamination--he wasn't too happy about it.


            --- In errorcoininformationexchange@yahoogroups.com, "Marc" <numismistake@...> wrote:
            >
            > Acetone should be the 'drug' of choice. Here is a chemical company that will sell you a long term supply that is what we call Reagent Grade, chemically preservative free and good for doing other chemical reactions withour fear of cross chemical contamination.
            >
            > http://secure.sciencecompany.com/Acetone-ACS-Reagent-Grade-16oz-P6659C670.aspx
            >
            > Since acetone mixes with water very well, if you'd like, a series of subsequent baths after treatment in distilled water is fine too. Good Luck..Try test pieces first and wait a few days.
            >
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