Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Re: First Annual Coin and Collectibles Philadelphia Expo

Expand Messages
  • chrisptaters
    I have been collecting coins for over forty years. In the last couple of years I have been educating my daughter on the numismatic hobby, as she is very
    Message 1 of 2 , Sep 27, 2009
    • 0 Attachment
      I have been collecting coins for over forty years. In the last couple of years I have been educating my daughter on the numismatic hobby, as she is very excited to learn about the coinage of the United States. I have given her hundreds of rolls of different denominations for her collection as I have found myself that the best way to learn is actually hold in hand the different coins and study the different details such as mint mark locations, size and weight etc. I decided to order for her educational purposes some of the "REPLICA" coins I had seen on sale from China on Ebay that I would probably never be able to obtain such as 1804 US silver dollar, 1933 gold double eagle etc. I purchased approximately 40 different coins from 5 different sellers in the BIN category ranging in price from $2-$3 with free shipping. After I received all the orders I noticed that what I thought were different sellers, actually the items were packaged in the same type envelopes and the handwriting on the customs forms that the sellers fill out had the exact same handwriting. It really amazed me how accurate the details were on each coin. I later found out that these coins were replicated using actual US mint coins except that the date was probably one digit different and was changed to reflect the rare date. Example the 1804 silver dollar might have been replicated from a real 1801 silver dollar. On most of the replica's the planchet on which they were produced looked real in size but the weight was not exactly correct, but holding in your hand, most collectors would be fooled. Even the antiquing process they used gave the coin an accurately aged looked. I have recently learned that for a premium, an exact weight and metal content replica coin can be purchased. What really made me irate was that all of the coins were in direct violation of the US Code of Federal Regulations U.S. Hobby Protection Act - 15USC-2101 Title 16, Volume 1, Sec. 304.6
      I explained to my daughter that this breach will ruin the coin collecting hobby. Please beware and don't be stupid and pay a high price for something you are not completely sure of unless you can absolutely be assured you can receive a full refund.




      --- In errorcoininformationexchange@yahoogroups.com, "Marc" <numismistake@...> wrote:
      >
      > (2nd try...more later)
      >
      > I took Amtrak to Philadelphia yesterday for the first day of this First Annual show sponsored by Whitman, who does the tri-annual Baltimore shows. Here is a report.
      >
      > There was no shortage of error coin dealers. Fred Weinberg, Rich Schemmer, Glen Burger, Frank Leone, and Mike Maino were and still are there. There were many minor errors in the $10 and under range; clips, o/c's, lams and die cracks. Also many eye popping errors and multi-coin errors in the $125 - $2000+ range, but not many strike errors in the middle price range ($25-100). That is what this collector preferred. Two dealers told me that they didn't bring 'that' box with them this time, and one said he didn't make money on them (huh?) and table fees were $1000.
      >
      > I didn't go home empty handed, but 2 coins is better than none.
      >
      > However, this was not a wasted trip for me. There were 5 display cases in the large (2 aisles X 20 tables) Whitman area in the front of the hall. 3 of these cases were 1 display, that of Chinese counterfeit coins and dies. There was also an educational forum with 3 handouts 11AM and 3PM each day. Each is run by Dr. Gregory V. Dubay, a physician that befriended the Chinese and treated patients in China. He'll be going there again. He is also a coin collector.
      >
      > (paraphrasing from one of his 3 handouts:)
      > He befriended Mr. Lin Ciyun, the owner and operator of the Big Tree Coin Factory, a legal enterprising manufacturing facility and one of 100 in the Fujian Province of China. "Mr. Ciyun's coin presses were at one time in operation at a US Mint and subsequently sent to the Shanghai China Mint in the early twentieth century. In the mid-1950's the presses and ancillary equipment, being obsolete for the modern coining needs of China, were sold off as scrap and ended up in the counterfeit's shops of Fujian Province of China. Currently, Mr. Ciyun's Chinese counterfeit coins are struck on original U.S. mint coin presses and at the identical strike pressores as the original coins."
      >
      > His shop alone produces 100,000 coins a month.
      >
      > He also makes error coins, and is progressing to do better, as he has in making Morgans and all other early US coinage. They buy up 'error coin' planchets on eBay and other sources.
      >
      > (2nd try - more later) explained - this is where I was last night when I accidently hit the Esc key and wiped out 1/2 hour of work)
      >
      > More to come with counterfeit coin and error coin photos.
      >
    Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.