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Unusual double strike

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  • dermestid
    I wasn t expecting to win this coin, considering how unusual an error it is: http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&item=320421081124 It appears to have
    Message 1 of 5 , Sep 13, 2009
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      I wasn't expecting to win this coin, considering how unusual an error it is:

      http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&item=320421081124

      It appears to have been first struck as a uniface broadstrike. The second strike appears to have taken place beneath a fresh planchet of normal size. Hence the well-defined circular depression.

      I've only seen a handful of errors documenting this sequence of events. So I'm happy I snagged it at a modest price.
    • dermestid
      This 1934 cent features an unusual double strike. The first strike was about 60% off-center and weak enough that the struck tongue of metal did not expand to
      Message 2 of 5 , Nov 11, 2013
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        This 1934 cent features an unusual double strike.  The first strike was about 60% off-center and weak enough that the struck tongue of metal did not expand to any measurable extent.  The second strike was perfectly centered and broadstruck.


        http://www.ebay.com/itm/121207865993

        It may be that the first strike was largely confined to the proto-rim of the planchet since there's no trace of an underlying design beneath the broadstrike.  Then again, the first strike details could simply have been erased during the second strike.
      • Jon P. Sullivan
        Looks to me like the design was simply obliterated by the second strike. Kind of a neat coin, and I think it sold cheap. Written from iPhone
        Message 3 of 5 , Nov 12, 2013
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          Looks to me like the design was simply obliterated by the second strike. Kind of a neat coin, and I think it sold cheap.

          Written from iPhone

          On Nov 11, 2013, at 7:31 AM, mdia1@... wrote:

           

          This 1934 cent features an unusual double strike.  The first strike was about 60% off-center and weak enough that the struck tongue of metal did not expand to any measurable extent.  The second strike was perfectly centered and broadstruck.



          It may be that the first strike was largely confined to the proto-rim of the planchet since there's no trace of an underlying design beneath the broadstrike.  Then again, the first strike details could simply have been erased during the second strike.

        • dermestid
          I have a hunch that I might be dealing with a delayed second strike. I m hoping that sliver of first-strike design preserves enough die markers (or is devoid
          Message 4 of 5 , Nov 14, 2013
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            I have a hunch that I might be dealing with a delayed second strike.  I'm hoping that sliver of first-strike design preserves enough die markers (or is devoid of die markers discernible on the second strike) that I'll be able to determine if both strikes are from the same die pair.  If the die markers differ, then the two strikes would have to be from two different presses (or the same press after a change of dies) since dual and quad presses weren't introduced until 1948 (the earliest saddle strike I'm aware of).


            I'll let you know how it turns out. 



            ---In errorcoininformationexchange@yahoogroups.com, <snumismatics@...> wrote:

            Looks to me like the design was simply obliterated by the second strike. Kind of a neat coin, and I think it sold cheap.

            Written from iPhone

            On Nov 11, 2013, at 7:31 AM, mdia1@... wrote:

             

            This 1934 cent features an unusual double strike.  The first strike was about 60% off-center and weak enough that the struck tongue of metal did not expand to any measurable extent.  The second strike was perfectly centered and broadstruck.



            It may be that the first strike was largely confined to the proto-rim of the planchet since there's no trace of an underlying design beneath the broadstrike.  Then again, the first strike details could simply have been erased during the second strike.
          • dermestid
            I now have the coin and both strikes are from the same die pair. ... I have a hunch that I might be dealing with a delayed second strike. I m hoping that
            Message 5 of 5 , Nov 16, 2013
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              I now have the coin and both strikes are from the same die pair. 



              ---In errorcoininformationexchange@yahoogroups.com, <mdia1@...> wrote:

              I have a hunch that I might be dealing with a delayed second strike.  I'm hoping that sliver of first-strike design preserves enough die markers (or is devoid of die markers discernible on the second strike) that I'll be able to determine if both strikes are from the same die pair.  If the die markers differ, then the two strikes would have to be from two different presses (or the same press after a change of dies) since dual and quad presses weren't introduced until 1948 (the earliest saddle strike I'm aware of).


              I'll let you know how it turns out. 



              ---In errorcoininformationexchange@yahoogroups.com, <snumismatics@...> wrote:

              Looks to me like the design was simply obliterated by the second strike. Kind of a neat coin, and I think it sold cheap.

              Written from iPhone

              On Nov 11, 2013, at 7:31 AM, mdia1@... wrote:

               

              This 1934 cent features an unusual double strike.  The first strike was about 60% off-center and weak enough that the struck tongue of metal did not expand to any measurable extent.  The second strike was perfectly centered and broadstruck.



              It may be that the first strike was largely confined to the proto-rim of the planchet since there's no trace of an underlying design beneath the broadstrike.  Then again, the first strike details could simply have been erased during the second strike.
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