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Re: [Error Coin Information Exchange] Re: Very Strange looking error coin * Is it...

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  • Michael Evanchik
    yea i wrote that before i saw the other mikes post. ... From: Mike Diamond Subject: [Error Coin Information Exchange] Re: Very Strange looking
    Message 1 of 7 , Jun 30, 2009
      yea i wrote that before i saw the other mikes post.

      --- On Wed, 7/1/09, Mike Diamond <mdia1@...> wrote:

      From: Mike Diamond <mdia1@...>
      Subject: [Error Coin Information Exchange] Re: Very Strange looking error coin * Is it...
      To: errorcoininformationexchange@yahoogroups.com
      Date: Wednesday, July 1, 2009, 12:11 AM

      Struck through a struck fragment, struck by a struck fragment, brockaged by a struck fragment ... it all means the same thing.

      --- In errorcoininformatio nexchange@ yahoogroups. com, Michael Evanchik <ivan0000013@ ...> wrote:
      >
      > couldnt it be struck through a struck fragment? and its really a full brockage but just of the fragment? know what i mean?


    • Mike Diamond
      It s incuse, but it s not a brockage because it s normally oriented. This coin was struck through a thin struck fragment that had originally been struck
      Message 2 of 7 , Jul 26, 2009
        It's incuse, but it's not a brockage because it's normally oriented. This coin was struck through a thin struck fragment that had originally been struck against an unstruck planchet. This allowed the thin metal to conform to the recesses of the die face. Then the fragment fell out, shifted a bit, and landed the planchet represented by your coin. When the fragment was struck the metal reversed direction. Instead of raised toward the reverse die face, it bulged into the planchet.

        Any thin struck piece of metal that originally receives a uniface strike and then falls out will leave normally-oriented incuse design elements on the planchet it is struck into. You also see this in shifted cap strikes. Same principal.

        --- In errorcoininformationexchange@yahoogroups.com, "Tom" <goldpans@...> wrote:
        >
        > Here's the link.
        > http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&item=110415347048
        >
        >
        > --- In errorcoininformationexchange@yahoogroups.com, "Mike Diamond" <mdia1@> wrote:
        > >
        > > Struck through a struck fragment, struck by a struck fragment, brockaged by a struck fragment ... it all means the same thing.
        > >
        > > --- In errorcoininformationexchange@yahoogroups.com, Michael Evanchik <ivan0000013@> wrote:
        > > >
        > > > couldnt it be struck through a struck fragment? and its really a full brockage but just of the fragment? know what i mean?
        > >
        >
      • Mike Diamond
        A simple strike-thru error wouldn t show any recognizable design elements. This is best labeled as struck through a thin struck fragment . As to the nature
        Message 3 of 7 , Jul 26, 2009
          A simple strike-thru error wouldn't show any recognizable design elements. This is best labeled as "struck through a thin struck fragment". As to the nature of the fragment, it could be a flake that delaminated from a struck coin, a flake that delaminated from a planchet and was then struck into a planchet, a scrap from a disintegrated die cap -- there's no way to know. All we can be certain of is that the side that faced the reverse die was die-struck, while the side that faced the planchet represented by this coin had an incuse version of the letter "O".

          --- In errorcoininformationexchange@yahoogroups.com, "Tom" <goldpans@...> wrote:
          >
          > Thanks Mike. So it's just a simple strike-thru error then?
          >
          > --- In errorcoininformationexchange@yahoogroups.com, "Mike Diamond" <mdia1@> wrote:
          > >
          > > It's incuse, but it's not a brockage because it's normally oriented. This coin was struck through a thin struck fragment that had originally been struck against an unstruck planchet. This allowed the thin metal to conform to the recesses of the die face. Then the fragment fell out, shifted a bit, and landed the planchet represented by your coin. When the fragment was struck the metal reversed direction. Instead of raised toward the reverse die face, it bulged into the planchet.
          > >
          > > Any thin struck piece of metal that originally receives a uniface strike and then falls out will leave normally-oriented incuse design elements on the planchet it is struck into. You also see this in shifted cap strikes. Same principal.
          > >
          > > --- In errorcoininformationexchange@yahoogroups.com, "Tom" <goldpans@> wrote:
          > > >
          > > > Here's the link.
          > > > http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&item=110415347048
          > > >
          > > >
          > > > --- In errorcoininformationexchange@yahoogroups.com, "Mike Diamond" <mdia1@> wrote:
          > > > >
          > > > > Struck through a struck fragment, struck by a struck fragment, brockaged by a struck fragment ... it all means the same thing.
          > > > >
          > > > > --- In errorcoininformationexchange@yahoogroups.com, Michael Evanchik <ivan0000013@> wrote:
          > > > > >
          > > > > > couldnt it be struck through a struck fragment? and its really a full brockage but just of the fragment? know what i mean?
          > > > >
          > > >
          > >
          >
        • Mike Diamond
          You can t go wrong for a buck. Given the small size of the strike-thru, it wouldn t be worth more than $10, in my opinion. Value would be proprotional to the
          Message 4 of 7 , Jul 26, 2009
            You can't go wrong for a buck. Given the small size of the strike-thru, it wouldn't be worth more than $10, in my opinion. Value would be proprotional to the size of the strike-thru and the clarity of the incuse design elements.

            --- In errorcoininformationexchange@yahoogroups.com, "Tom" <goldpans@...> wrote:
            >
            > Thanks alot Mike,
            > This is my first error of this type and worth the .99 cent gamble.
            > Is this not a very sought after error since I got it so cheap and the lack of bids?
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