Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Re: [Error Coin Information Exchange] Re: Halloween Brainteaser

Expand Messages
  • Bob Kearney
    Are you talking about the flesh eating worms (or maggots?)? ... From: pwrwgndrvr To: errorcoininformationexchange@yahoogroups.com Sent: Sunday, October 20,
    Message 1 of 7 , Oct 20, 2002
    • 0 Attachment
      Are you talking about the flesh eating worms (or maggots?)?
      ----- Original Message -----
      Sent: Sunday, October 20, 2002 8:44 AM
      Subject: [Error Coin Information Exchange] Re: Halloween Brainteaser

      Clue for today. See the 6 additional pics in the Quiz Pics album.
      This is the end result of the process. What is it?



      --- In errorcoininformationexchange@y..., pwrwgndrvr <no_reply@y...>
      wrote:
      > Ive posted a scan in the album titled Quiz Pics.
      > This is off subject, but nevertheless interesting.
      > Who knows what this is?
      > Clue: It is widely used in science and taxidermy.
      > Rule #1: Mike D can't answer.



      To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
      errorcoininformationexchange-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com



      Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to the Yahoo! Terms of Service.
    • pwrwgndrvr
      Close Bob. They are not maggots (larvae of flies). They are larvae of an insect. What is it and what are they called? ... Brainteaser ... ...
      Message 2 of 7 , Oct 20, 2002
      • 0 Attachment
        Close Bob. They are not maggots (larvae of flies). They are larvae of
        an insect. What is it and what are they called?


        --- In errorcoininformationexchange@y..., "Bob Kearney" <starjb@c...>
        wrote:
        > Are you talking about the flesh eating worms (or maggots?)?
        > ----- Original Message -----
        > From: pwrwgndrvr
        > To: errorcoininformationexchange@y...
        > Sent: Sunday, October 20, 2002 8:44 AM
        > Subject: [Error Coin Information Exchange] Re: Halloween
        Brainteaser
        >
        >
        > Clue for today. See the 6 additional pics in the Quiz Pics album.
        > This is the end result of the process. What is it?
        >
        >
        >
        > --- In errorcoininformationexchange@y..., pwrwgndrvr
        <no_reply@y...>
        > wrote:
        > > Ive posted a scan in the album titled Quiz Pics.
        > > This is off subject, but nevertheless interesting.
        > > Who knows what this is?
        > > Clue: It is widely used in science and taxidermy.
        > > Rule #1: Mike D can't answer.
        >
        >
        > Yahoo! Groups Sponsor
        > ADVERTISEMENT
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        > To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
        > errorcoininformationexchange-unsubscribe@y...
        >
        >
        >
        > Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to the Yahoo! Terms of
        Service.
      • Bob Kearney
        DERMESTID BEETLES ... From: pwrwgndrvr To: errorcoininformationexchange@yahoogroups.com Sent: Sunday, October 20, 2002 1:20 PM Subject: [Error Coin Information
        Message 3 of 7 , Oct 20, 2002
        • 0 Attachment
          DERMESTID BEETLES
          ----- Original Message -----
          Sent: Sunday, October 20, 2002 1:20 PM
          Subject: [Error Coin Information Exchange] Re: Halloween Brainteaser

          Close Bob. They are not maggots (larvae of flies). They are larvae of
          an insect. What is it and what are they called?


          --- In errorcoininformationexchange@y..., "Bob Kearney" <starjb@c...>
          wrote:
          > Are you talking about the flesh eating worms (or maggots?)?
          >   ----- Original Message -----
          >   From: pwrwgndrvr
          >   To: errorcoininformationexchange@y...
          >   Sent: Sunday, October 20, 2002 8:44 AM
          >   Subject: [Error Coin Information Exchange] Re: Halloween
          Brainteaser
          >
          >
          >   Clue for today. See the 6 additional pics in the Quiz Pics album.
          >   This is the end result of the process. What is it?
          >
          >
          >
          >   --- In errorcoininformationexchange@y..., pwrwgndrvr
          <no_reply@y...>
          >   wrote:
          >   > Ive posted a scan in the album titled Quiz Pics.
          >   > This is off subject, but nevertheless interesting.
          >   > Who knows what this is?
          >   > Clue: It is widely used in science and taxidermy.
          >   > Rule #1: Mike D can't answer.
          >
          >
          >         Yahoo! Groups Sponsor
          >               ADVERTISEMENT
          >             
          >              
          >       
          >       
          >
          >   To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
          >   errorcoininformationexchange-unsubscribe@y...
          >
          >
          >
          >   Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to the Yahoo! Terms of
          Service.



          To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
          errorcoininformationexchange-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com



          Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to the Yahoo! Terms of Service.
        • Bob Kearney
          And the skull is a bear skull. ... From: Bob Kearney To: errorcoininformationexchange@yahoogroups.com Sent: Sunday, October 20, 2002 3:36 PM Subject: Re:
          Message 4 of 7 , Oct 20, 2002
          • 0 Attachment
            And the skull is a bear skull.
            ----- Original Message -----
            Sent: Sunday, October 20, 2002 3:36 PM
            Subject: Re: [Error Coin Information Exchange] Re: Halloween Brainteaser

            DERMESTID BEETLES
            ----- Original Message -----
            Sent: Sunday, October 20, 2002 1:20 PM
            Subject: [Error Coin Information Exchange] Re: Halloween Brainteaser

            Close Bob. They are not maggots (larvae of flies). They are larvae of
            an insect. What is it and what are they called?


            --- In errorcoininformationexchange@y..., "Bob Kearney" <starjb@c...>
            wrote:
            > Are you talking about the flesh eating worms (or maggots?)?
            >   ----- Original Message -----
            >   From: pwrwgndrvr
            >   To: errorcoininformationexchange@y...
            >   Sent: Sunday, October 20, 2002 8:44 AM
            >   Subject: [Error Coin Information Exchange] Re: Halloween
            Brainteaser
            >
            >
            >   Clue for today. See the 6 additional pics in the Quiz Pics album.
            >   This is the end result of the process. What is it?
            >
            >
            >
            >   --- In errorcoininformationexchange@y..., pwrwgndrvr
            <no_reply@y...>
            >   wrote:
            >   > Ive posted a scan in the album titled Quiz Pics.
            >   > This is off subject, but nevertheless interesting.
            >   > Who knows what this is?
            >   > Clue: It is widely used in science and taxidermy.
            >   > Rule #1: Mike D can't answer.
            >
            >
            >         Yahoo! Groups Sponsor
            >               ADVERTISEMENT
            >             
            >              
            >       
            >       
            >
            >   To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
            >   errorcoininformationexchange-unsubscribe@y...
            >
            >
            >
            >   Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to the Yahoo! Terms of
            Service.



            To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
            errorcoininformationexchange-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com



            Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to the Yahoo! Terms of Service.


            To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
            errorcoininformationexchange-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com



            Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to the Yahoo! Terms of Service.
          • pwrwgndrvr
            Yup, that s it. Widely used in scientific research involving animal skeletons and in the taxidermy industry to clean bones. Some universities maintain large
            Message 5 of 7 , Oct 20, 2002
            • 0 Attachment
              Yup, that's it. Widely used in scientific research involving animal
              skeletons and in the taxidermy industry to clean bones. Some
              universities maintain large colonies for this purpose.

              DERMESTID BEETLES DO THE WORK OF EATING ALL THE FLESH OFF OF SKULLS
              AND BONES

              Most people boil skulls until the meat literally falls off. While
              cooking, the melted fat soaks into the bone. This results in greasy
              yellow skulls. Using beetles eliminates this problem.

              The dermestid or carpet beetle belongs to the family Dermestidae.
              Dermestids feed on dry-moist animal material. There are many species
              of Dermestid beetles that are native to N. America and will
              invariably show up at a carcass. Domestic colonization of wild
              species has proven to be very difficult at best. The species most
              easily colonized is Dermestes maculatus. These beetles undergo
              complete metamorphosis; that is, egg, larval, pupal, and adult
              stages. The complete life cycle lasts about 45 days per generation.
              Adults (beetle looking), lay eggs which are too small to be seen with
              the naked eye. A few days later very small larvae hatch out which
              begin looking for their first meal. Larval dermestids measure only a
              few millimeters at "birth" and are small enough to deflesh brain
              cavities, spinal columns, and other small openings in the tiniest of
              animal skeletons. The larvae continue eating and molting 8 times
              before they reach about ¾ of an inch in length. This growing/molting
              period lasts about 30 days. It is the larvae that do the majority of
              the cleaning. The large larvae then find a quiet spot and pupate. As
              they pupate their last outer larvae skin falls off leaving them
              somewhat yellow in appearance. 7 days later out comes an adult.
              Within a day or two the adult is laying 4-5 eggs a day and the whole
              process begins anew. The adults live for about 3 months

              Once a dermestid beetle colony is well established, a deer skull can
              be cleaned overnight. The bear skull pictured was cleaned by the
              beetles in less than 24 hrs.

              Interesting Links:
              http://www.skulltaxidermy.com/kits.html

              http://www.nsrl.ttu.edu/virtualtour/dermesti.htm




              --- In errorcoininformationexchange@y..., "Bob Kearney" <starjb@c...>
              wrote:
              > And the skull is a bear skull.
              > ----- Original Message -----
              > From: Bob Kearney
              > To: errorcoininformationexchange@y...
              > Sent: Sunday, October 20, 2002 3:36 PM
              > Subject: Re: [Error Coin Information Exchange] Re: Halloween
              Brainteaser
              >
              >
              > DERMESTID BEETLES
              > ----- Original Message -----
              > From: pwrwgndrvr
              > To: errorcoininformationexchange@y...
              > Sent: Sunday, October 20, 2002 1:20 PM
              > Subject: [Error Coin Information Exchange] Re: Halloween
              Brainteaser
              >
              >
              > Close Bob. They are not maggots (larvae of flies). They are
              larvae of
              > an insect. What is it and what are they called?
              >
              >
              > --- In errorcoininformationexchange@y..., "Bob Kearney"
              <starjb@c...>
              > wrote:
              > > Are you talking about the flesh eating worms (or maggots?)?
              > > ----- Original Message -----
              > > From: pwrwgndrvr
              > > To: errorcoininformationexchange@y...
              > > Sent: Sunday, October 20, 2002 8:44 AM
              > > Subject: [Error Coin Information Exchange] Re: Halloween
              > Brainteaser
              > >
              > >
              > > Clue for today. See the 6 additional pics in the Quiz Pics
              album.
              > > This is the end result of the process. What is it?
              > >
              > >
              > >
              > > --- In errorcoininformationexchange@y..., pwrwgndrvr
              > <no_reply@y...>
              > > wrote:
              > > > Ive posted a scan in the album titled Quiz Pics.
              > > > This is off subject, but nevertheless interesting.
              > > > Who knows what this is?
              > > > Clue: It is widely used in science and taxidermy.
              > > > Rule #1: Mike D can't answer.
              > >
              > >
              > > Yahoo! Groups Sponsor
              > > ADVERTISEMENT
              > >
              > >
              > >
              > >
              > >
              > > To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
              > > errorcoininformationexchange-unsubscribe@y...
              > >
              > >
              > >
              > > Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to the Yahoo! Terms of
              > Service.
              >
              >
              >
              > To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
              > errorcoininformationexchange-unsubscribe@y...
              >
              >
              >
              > Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to the Yahoo! Terms of
              Service.
              >
              >
              > Yahoo! Groups Sponsor
              > ADVERTISEMENT
              >
              >
              >
              >
              >
              > To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
              > errorcoininformationexchange-unsubscribe@y...
              >
              >
              >
              > Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to the Yahoo! Terms of
              Service.
            • pwrwgndrvr
              I believe it was a Dermestid Beetle Larva that crawled into the ear of Chekov and controlled his mind, in the Star Trek Movie Wrath of Khan . ... species ...
              Message 6 of 7 , Oct 20, 2002
              • 0 Attachment
                I believe it was a Dermestid Beetle Larva that crawled into the ear
                of Chekov and controlled his mind, in the Star Trek Movie "Wrath of
                Khan".




                --- In errorcoininformationexchange@y..., pwrwgndrvr <no_reply@y...>
                wrote:
                > Yup, that's it. Widely used in scientific research involving animal
                > skeletons and in the taxidermy industry to clean bones. Some
                > universities maintain large colonies for this purpose.
                >
                > DERMESTID BEETLES DO THE WORK OF EATING ALL THE FLESH OFF OF SKULLS
                > AND BONES
                >
                > Most people boil skulls until the meat literally falls off. While
                > cooking, the melted fat soaks into the bone. This results in greasy
                > yellow skulls. Using beetles eliminates this problem.
                >
                > The dermestid or carpet beetle belongs to the family Dermestidae.
                > Dermestids feed on dry-moist animal material. There are many
                species
                > of Dermestid beetles that are native to N. America and will
                > invariably show up at a carcass. Domestic colonization of wild
                > species has proven to be very difficult at best. The species most
                > easily colonized is Dermestes maculatus. These beetles undergo
                > complete metamorphosis; that is, egg, larval, pupal, and adult
                > stages. The complete life cycle lasts about 45 days per generation.
                > Adults (beetle looking), lay eggs which are too small to be seen
                with
                > the naked eye. A few days later very small larvae hatch out which
                > begin looking for their first meal. Larval dermestids measure only
                a
                > few millimeters at "birth" and are small enough to deflesh brain
                > cavities, spinal columns, and other small openings in the tiniest
                of
                > animal skeletons. The larvae continue eating and molting 8 times
                > before they reach about ¾ of an inch in length. This
                growing/molting
                > period lasts about 30 days. It is the larvae that do the majority
                of
                > the cleaning. The large larvae then find a quiet spot and pupate.
                As
                > they pupate their last outer larvae skin falls off leaving them
                > somewhat yellow in appearance. 7 days later out comes an adult.
                > Within a day or two the adult is laying 4-5 eggs a day and the
                whole
                > process begins anew. The adults live for about 3 months
                >
                > Once a dermestid beetle colony is well established, a deer skull
                can
                > be cleaned overnight. The bear skull pictured was cleaned by the
                > beetles in less than 24 hrs.
                >
                > Interesting Links:
                > http://www.skulltaxidermy.com/kits.html
                >
                > http://www.nsrl.ttu.edu/virtualtour/dermesti.htm
                >
                >
                >
                >
                > --- In errorcoininformationexchange@y..., "Bob Kearney"
                <starjb@c...>
                > wrote:
                > > And the skull is a bear skull.
                > > ----- Original Message -----
                > > From: Bob Kearney
                > > To: errorcoininformationexchange@y...
                > > Sent: Sunday, October 20, 2002 3:36 PM
                > > Subject: Re: [Error Coin Information Exchange] Re: Halloween
                > Brainteaser
                > >
                > >
                > > DERMESTID BEETLES
                > > ----- Original Message -----
                > > From: pwrwgndrvr
                > > To: errorcoininformationexchange@y...
                > > Sent: Sunday, October 20, 2002 1:20 PM
                > > Subject: [Error Coin Information Exchange] Re: Halloween
                > Brainteaser
                > >
                > >
                > > Close Bob. They are not maggots (larvae of flies). They are
                > larvae of
                > > an insect. What is it and what are they called?
                > >
                > >
                > > --- In errorcoininformationexchange@y..., "Bob Kearney"
                > <starjb@c...>
                > > wrote:
                > > > Are you talking about the flesh eating worms (or maggots?)?
                > > > ----- Original Message -----
                > > > From: pwrwgndrvr
                > > > To: errorcoininformationexchange@y...
                > > > Sent: Sunday, October 20, 2002 8:44 AM
                > > > Subject: [Error Coin Information Exchange] Re: Halloween
                > > Brainteaser
                > > >
                > > >
                > > > Clue for today. See the 6 additional pics in the Quiz
                Pics
                > album.
                > > > This is the end result of the process. What is it?
                > > >
                > > >
                > > >
                > > > --- In errorcoininformationexchange@y..., pwrwgndrvr
                > > <no_reply@y...>
                > > > wrote:
                > > > > Ive posted a scan in the album titled Quiz Pics.
                > > > > This is off subject, but nevertheless interesting.
                > > > > Who knows what this is?
                > > > > Clue: It is widely used in science and taxidermy.
                > > > > Rule #1: Mike D can't answer.
                > > >
                > > >
                > > > Yahoo! Groups Sponsor
                > > > ADVERTISEMENT
                > > >
                > > >
                > > >
                > > >
                > > >
                > > > To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
                > > > errorcoininformationexchange-unsubscribe@y...
                > > >
                > > >
                > > >
                > > > Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to the Yahoo! Terms
                of
                > > Service.
                > >
                > >
                > >
                > > To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
                > > errorcoininformationexchange-unsubscribe@y...
                > >
                > >
                > >
                > > Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to the Yahoo! Terms of
                > Service.
                > >
                > >
                > > Yahoo! Groups Sponsor
                > > ADVERTISEMENT
                > >
                > >
                > >
                > >
                > >
                > > To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
                > > errorcoininformationexchange-unsubscribe@y...
                > >
                > >
                > >
                > > Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to the Yahoo! Terms of
                > Service.
              • Mike Diamond
                Well, you ve outed me, Terry, at least as regards the derivation of my Yahoo User ID. I figured it was appropriate, as I scavenge on- line auctions and
                Message 7 of 7 , Oct 20, 2002
                • 0 Attachment
                  Well, you've "outed" me, Terry, at least as regards the derivation of
                  my Yahoo User ID. I figured it was appropriate, as I scavenge on-
                  line auctions and dealer junkboxes for unrecognized treasures.

                  I kept a colony of dermestid beetles in my basement for about 8 years
                  (my wife never knew). I used them to prepare small skulls and
                  skeletons for teaching purposes and just for fun. They're actually
                  not hard to catch and maintain in captivity. But, like any captive
                  animals, you've got to feed them regularly and change their bedding
                  every few months.

                  > --- In errorcoininformationexchange@y..., pwrwgndrvr
                  <no_reply@y...>
                  > wrote:
                  > > Yup, that's it. Widely used in scientific research involving
                  animal
                  > > skeletons and in the taxidermy industry to clean bones. Some
                  > > universities maintain large colonies for this purpose.
                  > >
                  > > DERMESTID BEETLES DO THE WORK OF EATING ALL THE FLESH OFF OF
                  SKULLS
                  > > AND BONES
                  > >
                  > > Most people boil skulls until the meat literally falls off. While
                  > > cooking, the melted fat soaks into the bone. This results in
                  greasy
                  > > yellow skulls. Using beetles eliminates this problem.
                  > >
                  > > The dermestid or carpet beetle belongs to the family Dermestidae.
                  > > Dermestids feed on dry-moist animal material. There are many
                  > species
                  > > of Dermestid beetles that are native to N. America and will
                  > > invariably show up at a carcass. Domestic colonization of wild
                  > > species has proven to be very difficult at best. The species most
                  > > easily colonized is Dermestes maculatus. These beetles undergo
                  > > complete metamorphosis; that is, egg, larval, pupal, and adult
                  > > stages. The complete life cycle lasts about 45 days per
                  generation.
                  > > Adults (beetle looking), lay eggs which are too small to be seen
                  > with
                  > > the naked eye. A few days later very small larvae hatch out which
                  > > begin looking for their first meal. Larval dermestids measure
                  only
                  > a
                  > > few millimeters at "birth" and are small enough to deflesh brain
                  > > cavities, spinal columns, and other small openings in the tiniest
                  > of
                  > > animal skeletons. The larvae continue eating and molting 8 times
                  > > before they reach about ¾ of an inch in length. This
                  > growing/molting
                  > > period lasts about 30 days. It is the larvae that do the majority
                  > of
                  > > the cleaning. The large larvae then find a quiet spot and pupate.
                  > As
                  > > they pupate their last outer larvae skin falls off leaving them
                  > > somewhat yellow in appearance. 7 days later out comes an adult.
                  > > Within a day or two the adult is laying 4-5 eggs a day and the
                  > whole
                  > > process begins anew. The adults live for about 3 months
                  > >
                  > > Once a dermestid beetle colony is well established, a deer skull
                  > can
                  > > be cleaned overnight. The bear skull pictured was cleaned by the
                  > > beetles in less than 24 hrs.
                  > >
                  > > Interesting Links:
                  > > http://www.skulltaxidermy.com/kits.html
                  > >
                  > > http://www.nsrl.ttu.edu/virtualtour/dermesti.htm
                  > >
                  > >
                  > >
                  > >
                  > > --- In errorcoininformationexchange@y..., "Bob Kearney"
                  > <starjb@c...>
                  > > wrote:
                  > > > And the skull is a bear skull.
                  > > > ----- Original Message -----
                  > > > From: Bob Kearney
                  > > > To: errorcoininformationexchange@y...
                  > > > Sent: Sunday, October 20, 2002 3:36 PM
                  > > > Subject: Re: [Error Coin Information Exchange] Re: Halloween
                  > > Brainteaser
                  > > >
                  > > >
                  > > > DERMESTID BEETLES
                  > > > ----- Original Message -----
                  > > > From: pwrwgndrvr
                  > > > To: errorcoininformationexchange@y...
                  > > > Sent: Sunday, October 20, 2002 1:20 PM
                  > > > Subject: [Error Coin Information Exchange] Re: Halloween
                  > > Brainteaser
                  > > >
                  > > >
                  > > > Close Bob. They are not maggots (larvae of flies). They are
                  > > larvae of
                  > > > an insect. What is it and what are they called?
                  > > >
                  > > >
                  > > > --- In errorcoininformationexchange@y..., "Bob Kearney"
                  > > <starjb@c...>
                  > > > wrote:
                  > > > > Are you talking about the flesh eating worms (or
                  maggots?)?
                  > > > > ----- Original Message -----
                  > > > > From: pwrwgndrvr
                  > > > > To: errorcoininformationexchange@y...
                  > > > > Sent: Sunday, October 20, 2002 8:44 AM
                  > > > > Subject: [Error Coin Information Exchange] Re:
                  Halloween
                  > > > Brainteaser
                  > > > >
                  > > > >
                  > > > > Clue for today. See the 6 additional pics in the Quiz
                  > Pics
                  > > album.
                  > > > > This is the end result of the process. What is it?
                  > > > >
                  > > > >
                  > > > >
                  > > > > --- In errorcoininformationexchange@y..., pwrwgndrvr
                  > > > <no_reply@y...>
                  > > > > wrote:
                  > > > > > Ive posted a scan in the album titled Quiz Pics.
                  > > > > > This is off subject, but nevertheless interesting.
                  > > > > > Who knows what this is?
                  > > > > > Clue: It is widely used in science and taxidermy.
                  > > > > > Rule #1: Mike D can't answer.
                  > > > >
                  > > > >
                  > > > > Yahoo! Groups Sponsor
                  > > > > ADVERTISEMENT
                  > > > >
                  > > > >
                  > > > >
                  > > > >
                  > > > >
                  > > > > To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
                  > > > > errorcoininformationexchange-unsubscribe@y...
                  > > > >
                  > > > >
                  > > > >
                  > > > > Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to the Yahoo!
                  Terms
                  > of
                  > > > Service.
                  > > >
                  > > >
                  > > >
                  > > > To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
                  > > > errorcoininformationexchange-unsubscribe@y...
                  > > >
                  > > >
                  > > >
                  > > > Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to the Yahoo! Terms of
                  > > Service.
                  > > >
                  > > >
                  > > > Yahoo! Groups Sponsor
                  > > > ADVERTISEMENT
                  > > >
                  > > >
                  > > >
                  > > >
                  > > >
                  > > > To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
                  > > > errorcoininformationexchange-unsubscribe@y...
                  > > >
                  > > >
                  > > >
                  > > > Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to the Yahoo! Terms of
                  > > Service.
                Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.