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De-plated Lincoln cent ?

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  • jylitalo
    It has not yet arrived, but I uploaded the auction pic s to default folder . The bloke I bought it from worked in a change vault at a bank in Minnesota in the
    Message 1 of 13 , Jun 24, 2008
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      It has not yet arrived, but I uploaded the auction pic's to 'default
      folder'.

      The bloke I bought it from worked in a change vault at a bank in
      Minnesota in the mid-eighties. He says he found it in among a mint
      bag. He had a bunch of normally plated, off-centers for sale with this
      same date, so I took a gamble.

      I realize its not shiny, bright and pristine, but instead looks
      suspiciously gray. The die-struck design looks pretty sharp on the
      obverse. The reverse picture from the auction was not as sharp. It's
      been in a Mylar holder all these years, so I am hoping it is simply
      oxidation rather than having been de-plated.

      I am not certain how to determine whether a Lincoln zinker has been
      de-plated, what exactly to look for?

      Once it gets here I will take some detailed pictures, but was hoping
      to lay it on the line here now, accepting that this coin will very
      likely get clobbered.
    • Mike Diamond
      I generally steer clear of heavily oxidized specimens because it becomes increasingly difficult to discriminate between genuine and altered specimens. Be that
      Message 2 of 13 , Jun 24, 2008
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        I generally steer clear of heavily oxidized specimens because it
        becomes increasingly difficult to discriminate between genuine and
        altered specimens.

        Be that as it may, what you would look for in a genuine specimen is
        the following:

        1. Weight a few hundredths of a gram below normal.
        2. Absence of bumps on the surface.
        3. Absence of bumps on the edge.
        4. Clear design.
        5. A smooth surface or, if oxidized, a fine, uniform matte texture.

        One of the best strategies you can employ is to compare the
        microscopic surface texture of a partially unplated cent with the
        surface texture of your fully unplated cent. They should be
        identical (given the same degree of oxidation). Partial plating
        errors are seldom faked.

        Good luck.

        --- In errorcoininformationexchange@yahoogroups.com, "jylitalo"
        <jylitalo@...> wrote:
        >
        > It has not yet arrived, but I uploaded the auction pic's to 'default
        > folder'.
        >
        > The bloke I bought it from worked in a change vault at a bank in
        > Minnesota in the mid-eighties. He says he found it in among a mint
        > bag. He had a bunch of normally plated, off-centers for sale with
        this
        > same date, so I took a gamble.
        >
        > I realize its not shiny, bright and pristine, but instead looks
        > suspiciously gray. The die-struck design looks pretty sharp on the
        > obverse. The reverse picture from the auction was not as sharp. It's
        > been in a Mylar holder all these years, so I am hoping it is simply
        > oxidation rather than having been de-plated.
        >
        > I am not certain how to determine whether a Lincoln zinker has been
        > de-plated, what exactly to look for?
        >
        > Once it gets here I will take some detailed pictures, but was hoping
        > to lay it on the line here now, accepting that this coin will very
        > likely get clobbered.
        >
      • fred_weinberg
        The general rules I use, when I talk to people on the phone, or thru email, is that: 1. If the Cent is real bright and shiny, it s probably been re-plated. 2.
        Message 3 of 13 , Jun 24, 2008
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          The general rules I use, when I talk to people on
          the phone, or thru email, is that:

          1. If the Cent is real bright and shiny, it's probably
          been re-plated.

          2. If the Cent is dark, dull, and grey, it's been
          de-plated.

          3. A genuine un-plated Zinc Cent should have original
          luster, and the surfaces should not fit into a
          description like #1 or #2 above.


          Fred


          - In errorcoininformationexchange@yahoogroups.com, "Mike Diamond"
          <mdia1@...> wrote:
          >
          > I generally steer clear of heavily oxidized specimens because it
          > becomes increasingly difficult to discriminate between genuine and
          > altered specimens.
          >
          > Be that as it may, what you would look for in a genuine specimen is
          > the following:
          >
          > 1. Weight a few hundredths of a gram below normal.
          > 2. Absence of bumps on the surface.
          > 3. Absence of bumps on the edge.
          > 4. Clear design.
          > 5. A smooth surface or, if oxidized, a fine, uniform matte texture.
          >
          > One of the best strategies you can employ is to compare the
          > microscopic surface texture of a partially unplated cent with the
          > surface texture of your fully unplated cent. They should be
          > identical (given the same degree of oxidation). Partial plating
          > errors are seldom faked.
          >
          > Good luck.
          >
          > --- In errorcoininformationexchange@yahoogroups.com, "jylitalo"
          > <jylitalo@> wrote:
          > >
          > > It has not yet arrived, but I uploaded the auction pic's
          to 'default
          > > folder'.
          > >
          > > The bloke I bought it from worked in a change vault at a bank in
          > > Minnesota in the mid-eighties. He says he found it in among a mint
          > > bag. He had a bunch of normally plated, off-centers for sale with
          > this
          > > same date, so I took a gamble.
          > >
          > > I realize its not shiny, bright and pristine, but instead looks
          > > suspiciously gray. The die-struck design looks pretty sharp on the
          > > obverse. The reverse picture from the auction was not as sharp.
          It's
          > > been in a Mylar holder all these years, so I am hoping it is
          simply
          > > oxidation rather than having been de-plated.
          > >
          > > I am not certain how to determine whether a Lincoln zinker has
          been
          > > de-plated, what exactly to look for?
          > >
          > > Once it gets here I will take some detailed pictures, but was
          hoping
          > > to lay it on the line here now, accepting that this coin will very
          > > likely get clobbered.
          > >
          >
        • jeff ylitalo
          Thanks for the info and insight, Mike D. Hopefully one of the Lincoln stretch strikes exposing the underlying zinc will do for comparison purposes. ... From:
          Message 4 of 13 , Jun 24, 2008
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            Thanks for the info and insight, Mike D.

            Hopefully one of the Lincoln 'stretch strikes' exposing the underlying zinc will do for comparison purposes.

            --- On Tue, 6/24/08, Mike Diamond <mdia1@...> wrote:
            From: Mike Diamond <mdia1@...>
            Subject: [Error Coin Information Exchange] Re: De-plated Lincoln cent ?
            To: errorcoininformationexchange@yahoogroups.com
            Date: Tuesday, June 24, 2008, 4:28 PM

            I generally steer clear of heavily oxidized specimens because it
            becomes increasingly difficult to discriminate between genuine and
            altered specimens.

            Be that as it may, what you would look for in a genuine specimen is
            the following:

            1. Weight a few hundredths of a gram below normal.
            2. Absence of bumps on the surface.
            3. Absence of bumps on the edge.
            4. Clear design.
            5. A smooth surface or, if oxidized, a fine, uniform matte texture.

            One of the best strategies you can employ is to compare the
            microscopic surface texture of a partially unplated cent with the &lt;>br> surface texture of your fully unplated cent. They should be
            identical (given the same degree of oxidation). Partial plating
            errors are seldom faked.

            Good luck.

            --- In errorcoininformatio nexchange@ yahoogroups. com, "jylitalo"
            <jylitalo@.. .> wrote:
            >
            > It has not yet arrived, but I uploaded the auction pic's to 'default
            > folder'.
            >
            > The bloke I bought it from worked in a change vault at a bank in
            > Minnesota in the mid-eighties. He says he found it in among a mint
            > bag. He had a bunch of normally plated, off-centers for sale with
            this
            > same date, so I took a gamble.
            >
            > I realize its not shiny, bright and pristine, but instead looks
            > suspiciously gray. The die-struck design looks pretty sharp on the
            > obverse. The reverse picture from the auction was not as sharp. It's
            > been in a Mylar holder all these years, so I am hoping it is simply
            > oxidation rather than having been de-plated.
            >
            > I am not certain how to determine whether a Lincoln zinker has been
            > de-plated, what exactly to look for?
            >
            > Once it gets here I will take some detailed pictures, but was hoping
            > to lay it on the line here now, accepting that this coin will very
            > likely get clobbered.
            >


          • Mike Diamond
            The exposed zinc of a stretch strike is not a very good substitute for the exposed zinc of a partially unplated cent. But you make do with what you ve got.
            Message 5 of 13 , Jun 24, 2008
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              The exposed zinc of a stretch strike is not a very good substitute for
              the exposed zinc of a partially unplated cent. But you make do with
              what you've got.

              --- In errorcoininformationexchange@yahoogroups.com, jeff ylitalo
              <jylitalo@...> wrote:
              >
              > Thanks for the info and insight, Mike D.
              >
              > Hopefully one of the Lincoln 'stretch strikes' exposing the
              underlying zinc will do for comparison purposes.
            • jylitalo
              I do have a blank zinc planchet which is plate-less. I m not confident it will prove a worthy aid for comparison purposes either, but I will certainly use it
              Message 6 of 13 , Jun 24, 2008
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                I do have a blank zinc planchet which is plate-less.

                I'm not confident it will prove a worthy aid for comparison purposes
                either, but I will certainly use it for such, and as you said, 'make
                do with what I've got'.

                Thanks

                --- In errorcoininformationexchange@yahoogroups.com, "Mike Diamond"
                <mdia1@...> wrote:
                >
                > The exposed zinc of a stretch strike is not a very good substitute for
                > the exposed zinc of a partially unplated cent. But you make do with
                > what you've got.
                >
                > --- In errorcoininformationexchange@yahoogroups.com, jeff ylitalo
                > <jylitalo@> wrote:
                > >
                > > Thanks for the info and insight, Mike D.
                > >
                > > Hopefully one of the Lincoln 'stretch strikes' exposing the
                > underlying zinc will do for comparison purposes.
                >
              • Travis Bolton
                I would like to add something to this. I have noticed that PLATED cents tend to have a greasy and slick feeling about them and a DEPLATED cent tends to have a
                Message 7 of 13 , Jun 24, 2008
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                  I would like to add something to this. I have noticed that PLATED cents tend to have a greasy and slick feeling about them and a DEPLATED cent tends to have a course texture and feeling to it. A genuine unplated cent has neither in my experience.

                  Here is a scan below of some fakes. The one on the top right is a plated fake (gold colors are light reflections from my scanner), the other two are de-plated. Obviously the plated coin is much more convincing but....no luster! I bought a group of errors a while ago that had a number of these fakes in the hoard, I was lucky to not have really paid for them and got a great educational group for my "fakes/damage collection". If you wish Jeff I could send you one of each for reference,  just drop me a note.

                  Photobucket">fakes 

                  --- In errorcoininformationexchange@yahoogroups.com, "Mike Diamond" <mdia1@...> wrote:
                  >
                  > The exposed zinc of a stretch strike is not a very good substitute for
                  > the exposed zinc of a partially unplated cent. But you make do with
                  > what you've got.
                  >
                  > --- In errorcoininformationexchange@yahoogroups.com, jeff ylitalo
                  > jylitalo@ wrote:
                  > >
                  > > Thanks for the info and insight, Mike D.
                  > >
                  > > Hopefully one of the Lincoln 'stretch strikes' exposing the
                  > underlying zinc will do for comparison purposes.
                  >

                • jylitalo
                  Hi Travis, Sure, that would be great. Appreciate your observations. I will contact you then. Thanks! Jeff
                  Message 8 of 13 , Jun 24, 2008
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                    Hi Travis,

                    Sure, that would be great.

                    Appreciate your observations.

                    I will contact you then.

                    Thanks!

                    Jeff

                    --- In errorcoininformationexchange@yahoogroups.com, "Travis Bolton"
                    <travisbolton543@...> wrote:
                    >
                    >
                    > I would like to add something to this. I have noticed that PLATED cents
                    > tend to have a greasy and slick feeling about them and a DEPLATED cent
                    > tends to have a course texture and feeling to it. A genuine unplated
                    > cent has neither in my experience.
                    >
                    > Here is a scan below of some fakes. The one on the top right is a plated
                    > fake (gold colors are light reflections from my scanner), the other two
                    > are de-plated. Obviously the plated coin is much more convincing
                    > but....no luster! I bought a group of errors a while ago that had a
                    > number of these fakes in the hoard, I was lucky to not have really paid
                    > for them and got a great educational group for my "fakes/damage
                    > collection". If you wish Jeff I could send you one of each for
                    > reference, just drop me a note.
                    >
                    > [Photobucket]
                    > <http://groups.yahoo.com/group/errorcoininformationexchange/> ">fakes
                    > --- In errorcoininformationexchange@yahoogroups.com, "Mike Diamond"
                    > <mdia1@> wrote:
                    > >
                    > > The exposed zinc of a stretch strike is not a very good substitute for
                    > > the exposed zinc of a partially unplated cent. But you make do with
                    > > what you've got.
                    > >
                    > > --- In errorcoininformationexchange@yahoogroups.com, jeff ylitalo
                    > > jylitalo@ wrote:
                    > > >
                    > > > Thanks for the info and insight, Mike D.
                    > > >
                    > > > Hopefully one of the Lincoln 'stretch strikes' exposing the
                    > > underlying zinc will do for comparison purposes.
                    > >
                    >
                  • Rafael
                    The unplated cent genesis is an interesting field to me. In fact, I have been collecting and observing its features ever since rescueing a lot of 300+
                    Message 9 of 13 , Jun 26, 2008
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                      The unplated cent genesis is an interesting field to me. In fact, I have been collecting and observing its features ever since rescueing a lot of 300+ unplateds from a reserve bank bag. There are many interesting situations to be exposed yet.

                       

                      Since you're probably interested in carrying out this fact disclosure quest a notch further, I can probably support your effort with samples on specific issues and years. Your initiative would probably clarify a lot of unanswered questions given the expertise at hand in this field.

                       

                      Also, would be interested in buying a 2000 D unplated cent for my collection.

                       

                      Jeff,  please contact me at your convenience and am glad for your interest of upping a notch in this research.

                      Rafael



                      --- On Tue, 6/24/08, jylitalo <jylitalo@...> wrote:
                      From: jylitalo <jylitalo@...>
                      Subject: [Error Coin Information Exchange] Re: De-plated Lincoln cent ?
                      To: errorcoininformationexchange@yahoogroups.com
                      Date: Tuesday, June 24, 2008, 6:58 PM

                      .
                        do have a blank zinc planchet which is plate-less.

                      I'm not confident it will prove a worthy aid for comparison purposes
                      either, but I will certainly use it for such, and as you said, 'make
                      do with what I've got'.

                      Thanks



                    • jeff ylitalo
                      Hi Rafael,   If I get to the point of making it a research project, I will be sure to take you up on your offer.   thanks,   Jeff  ... From: Rafael
                      Message 10 of 13 , Jun 26, 2008
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                        Hi Rafael,

                         

                        If I get to the point of making it a research project, I will be sure to take you up on your offer.

                         

                        thanks,

                         

                        Jeff 

                        --- On Thu, 6/26/08, Rafael <my_errors@...> wrote:

                        From: Rafael <my_errors@...>
                        Subject: [Error Coin Information Exchange] Re: De-plated Lincoln cent ?... Jeff & unplated cent fans
                        To: errorcoininformationexchange@yahoogroups.com
                        Cc: delgado@...
                        Date: Thursday, June 26, 2008, 10:41 AM

                         

                        Jeff,  please contact me at your convenience and am glad for your interest of upping a notch in this research.

                        Rafael



                        --- On Tue, 6/24/08, jylitalo <jylitalo@yahoo. com> wrote:
                        From: jylitalo <jylitalo@yahoo. com>
                        Subject: [Error Coin Information Exchange] Re: De-plated Lincoln cent ?
                        To: errorcoininformatio nexchange@ yahoogroups. com
                        Date: Tuesday, June 24, 2008, 6:58 PM

                        .
                        I do have a blank zinc planchet which is plate-less.

                        I'm not confident it will prove a worthy aid for comparison purposes
                        either, but I will certainly use it for such, and as you said, 'make
                        do with what I've got'.

                        Thanks




                      • jylitalo
                        This coin arrived after 8 weeks lost in some crevice at the Royal postal service office. This is what I can ascertain at the moment. (Pic s x 6 uploaded to
                        Message 11 of 13 , Aug 16, 2008
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                          This coin arrived after 8 weeks lost in some crevice at the Royal postal service office.

                          This is what I can ascertain at the moment.

                          (Pic's x 6 uploaded to default folder)


                          1. Weight a few hundredths of a gram below normal.
                              Weight is 2.50 grams (my working scale is accurate to only within 1/10th of 1 gram).

                          2. Absence of bumps on the surface.
                              There are bumps, but not like those on the comparison coin to the left. There are some internal die cracks present on the obverse face.

                          3. Absence of bumps on the edge.
                              The edge is smooth most theway around. The edge is interestingly grooved somehow which seemssomewhat out of place. I am not entirely sure what this groove represents. The coin is normal diameter, the comparison coin sent to me by Travis is smaller and was sent as a known fake.

                          4. Clear design.
                              The die design present seems well struck and is quite clear.

                          5. A smooth surface or, if oxidized, a fine, uniform matte texture.
                              The surface is pretty smooth, it is definately oxidized and seems a uniform matte texture.

                          Thanks.

                          --- In errorcoininformationexchange@yahoogroups.com, "Mike Diamond" <mdia1@...> wrote:
                          >
                          > I generally steer clear of heavily oxidized specimens because it
                          > becomes increasingly difficult to discriminate between genuine and
                          > altered specimens.
                          >
                          > Be that as it may, what you would look for in a genuine specimen is
                          > the following:
                          >
                          > 1. Weight a few hundredths of a gram below normal.
                          > 2. Absence of bumps on the surface.
                          > 3. Absence of bumps on the edge.
                          > 4. Clear design.
                          > 5. A smooth surface or, if oxidized, a fine, uniform matte texture.
                          >
                          > One of the best strategies you can employ is to compare the
                          > microscopic surface texture of a partially unplated cent with the
                          > surface texture of your fully unplated cent. They should be
                          > identical (given the same degree of oxidation). Partial plating
                          > errors are seldom faked.
                          >
                          > Good luck.

                        • Mike Diamond
                          I see two relatively large bumps to the left of Lincoln s bowtie and a scattering of smaller bumps elsewhere. Either is a warning sign. ... postal ... within
                          Message 12 of 13 , Aug 16, 2008
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                            I see two relatively large bumps to the left of Lincoln's bowtie and
                            a scattering of smaller bumps elsewhere. Either is a warning sign.

                            --- In errorcoininformationexchange@yahoogroups.com, "jylitalo"
                            <jylitalo@...> wrote:
                            >
                            > This coin arrived after 8 weeks lost in some crevice at the Royal
                            postal
                            > service office.
                            >
                            > This is what I can ascertain at the moment.
                            >
                            > (Pic's x 6 uploaded to default folder)
                            >
                            > 1. Weight a few hundredths of a gram below normal.
                            > Weight is 2.50 grams (my working scale is accurate to only
                            within
                            > 1/10th of 1 gram).
                            >
                            > 2. Absence of bumps on the surface.
                            > There are bumps, but not like those on the comparison coin to
                            the
                            > left. There are some internal die cracks present on the obverse
                            face.
                            >
                            > 3. Absence of bumps on the edge.
                            > The edge is smooth most theway around. The edge is
                            interestingly
                            > grooved somehow which seemssomewhat out of place. I am not entirely
                            sure
                            > what this groove represents. The coin is normal diameter, the
                            comparison
                            > coin sent to me by Travis is smaller and was sent as a known fake.
                            >
                            > 4. Clear design.
                            > The die design present seems well struck and is quite clear.
                            >
                            > 5. A smooth surface or, if oxidized, a fine, uniform matte texture.
                            > The surface is pretty smooth, it is definately oxidized and
                            seems a
                            > uniform matte texture.
                            >
                            > Thanks.
                            >
                            > --- In errorcoininformationexchange@yahoogroups.com, "Mike Diamond"
                            > <mdia1@> wrote:
                            > >
                            > > I generally steer clear of heavily oxidized specimens because it
                            > > becomes increasingly difficult to discriminate between genuine and
                            > > altered specimens.
                            > >
                            > > Be that as it may, what you would look for in a genuine specimen
                            is
                            > > the following:
                            > >
                            > > 1. Weight a few hundredths of a gram below normal.
                            > > 2. Absence of bumps on the surface.
                            > > 3. Absence of bumps on the edge.
                            > > 4. Clear design.
                            > > 5. A smooth surface or, if oxidized, a fine, uniform matte
                            texture.
                            > >
                            > > One of the best strategies you can employ is to compare the
                            > > microscopic surface texture of a partially unplated cent with the
                            > > surface texture of your fully unplated cent. They should be
                            > > identical (given the same degree of oxidation). Partial plating
                            > > errors are seldom faked.
                            > >
                            > > Good luck.
                            >
                          • Norm Higgs
                            I think de-plated (as opposed to un-plated) is definitely the correct term to apply to this coin. ... -- Norm Higgs http://forbiddenpc.com
                            Message 13 of 13 , Aug 16, 2008
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                              I think 'de-plated' (as opposed to un-plated) is definitely the correct
                              term to apply to this coin.

                              jylitalo wrote:
                              > *This coin arrived after 8 weeks lost in some crevice at the Royal
                              > postal service office.
                              >
                              > This is what I can ascertain at the moment.
                              >
                              > (Pic's x 6 uploaded to default folder)*
                              >
                              > 1. Weight a few hundredths of a gram below normal.
                              > Weight is 2.50 grams (my working scale is accurate to only within
                              > 1/10th of 1 gram).
                              >
                              > 2. Absence of bumps on the surface.
                              > There are bumps, but not like those on the comparison coin to the
                              > left. There are some internal die cracks present on the obverse face.
                              >
                              > 3. Absence of bumps on the edge.
                              > The edge is smooth most theway around. The edge is interestingly
                              > grooved somehow which seemssomewhat out of place. I am not entirely
                              > sure what this groove represents. The coin is normal diameter, the
                              > comparison coin sent to me by *Travis* is smaller and was sent as a
                              > known fake.
                              >
                              > 4. Clear design.
                              > The die design present seems well struck and is quite clear.
                              >
                              > 5. A smooth surface or, if oxidized, a fine, uniform matte texture.
                              > The surface is pretty smooth, it is definately oxidized and seems
                              > a uniform matte texture.
                              >
                              > *Thanks.*
                              >
                              > --- In errorcoininformationexchange@yahoogroups.com, "Mike Diamond"
                              > <mdia1@...> wrote:
                              > >
                              > > I generally steer clear of heavily oxidized specimens because it
                              > > becomes increasingly difficult to discriminate between genuine and
                              > > altered specimens.
                              > >
                              > > Be that as it may, what you would look for in a genuine specimen is
                              > > the following:
                              > >
                              > > 1. Weight a few hundredths of a gram below normal.
                              > > 2. Absence of bumps on the surface.
                              > > 3. Absence of bumps on the edge.
                              > > 4. Clear design.
                              > > 5. A smooth surface or, if oxidized, a fine, uniform matte texture.
                              > >
                              > > One of the best strategies you can employ is to compare the
                              > > microscopic surface texture of a partially unplated cent with the
                              > > surface texture of your fully unplated cent. They should be
                              > > identical (given the same degree of oxidation). Partial plating
                              > > errors are seldom faked.
                              > >
                              > > Good luck.
                              >
                              >


                              --
                              Norm Higgs
                              http://forbiddenpc.com
                              http://forbiddenpc.blogspot.com
                              https://linkedin.com/e/fpf/4018099
                              http://freetrafficbar.com?r=74276
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