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brockage by elliptical clip dime

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  • Mike Diamond
    I ve posted in the brockages and counterbrockages album an image of a broadstruck dime that was apparently brockaged by an elliptical clip dime. The obverse
    Message 1 of 2 , Oct 12, 2002
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      I've posted in the "brockages and counterbrockages" album an image of
      a broadstruck dime that was apparently brockaged by an elliptical
      clip dime. The obverse features a full, perfectly centered, first-
      strike brockage. The die-struck reverse is also perfectly centered.
      In this circumstance you'd expect the brockage to be complete.
      Instead, the brockage design is abruptly cut off in the NE quadrant
      and replaced by an unstruck crescent of coin metal.

      If anyone can come up with another explanation, I'd love to hear it.
    • Mike Diamond
      Sometimes the obvious escapes me, which is the case with this coin. There is a much more prosaic explanation for this error than a brockage by an elliptical
      Message 2 of 2 , Oct 24, 2002
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        Sometimes the obvious escapes me, which is the case with this coin.
        There is a much more prosaic explanation for this error than a
        brockage by an elliptical clip dime. It's much more likely that this
        is an aligned brockage from an off-center dime, otherwise known as a
        brockage from a partial die cap.

        This kind of brockage occurs when a planchet is struck off-center by
        the obverse (hammer) die and the resulting off-center coin adheres to
        the die face. This "partial cap" then is struck into a planchet that
        is fed in beneath it. The result is a partial brockage perfectly
        aligned with the reverse design. Such brockages are usually,
        although not inevitably, first-strike brockages. Such is the case
        with this coin.

        --- In errorcoininformationexchange@y..., "Mike Diamond" <mdia1@a...>
        wrote:
        > I've posted in the "brockages and counterbrockages" album an image
        of
        > a broadstruck dime that was apparently brockaged by an elliptical
        > clip dime. The obverse features a full, perfectly centered, first-
        > strike brockage. The die-struck reverse is also perfectly
        centered.
        > In this circumstance you'd expect the brockage to be complete.
        > Instead, the brockage design is abruptly cut off in the NE quadrant
        > and replaced by an unstruck crescent of coin metal.
        >
        > If anyone can come up with another explanation, I'd love to hear it.
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