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Re: Wrong Size Planchet Strikes

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  • Mike Diamond
    Any planchet that is smaller, or the same size as, the normal planchet will have no trouble entering the striking chamber. It is easily accomodated by the
    Message 1 of 3 , Oct 7, 2002
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      Any planchet that is smaller, or the same size as, the normal
      planchet will have no trouble entering the striking chamber. It is
      easily accomodated by the feeder tube, feed finger, or feeder
      hole/sprocket. That's why wrong planchet/off-metal errors are not
      that hard to find.

      Coins struck on oversized planchets are surpassingly rare. Some
      experts claim that all such errors are intentionally produced. I
      wouldn't go that far. It is possible for a technician to forget to
      change the feeder tube and feed finger when switching the dies to a
      smaller denomination. That would allow an oversized planchet to end
      up between the dies.

      You might wish to consult the ECIE archives for past discussions on
      this issue. Just type in keywords "oversized", "wrong planchet",
      and "off-metal".

      --- In errorcoininformationexchange@y..., "Ben" <insano@a...> wrote:
      > Why is always the wrong size planchet smaller than the right
      > planchet???
      > Is it because the feed fingers wont allow the planchet to enter the
      > coin chamber??
      > I think wrong size planchet errors are in most cases intencional,
      > like mules and things like that.
      >
      > I have one collector of spanish errors and fakes who has a coin of
      1
      > peseta struck in a bigger planchet of 5 pesetas.
      > http://personales.ya.com/numisma/Error/00010.jpg
      >
      > I dont know why there are lines all over near the rim.
      >
      > Regards
      > Benjamin
    • Mike Diamond
      As to the lines, there may be more than one explanation. It appears that the coin has a beaded border. In a coin struck out- of-collar (which will be true of
      Message 2 of 3 , Oct 7, 2002
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        As to the lines, there may be more than one explanation.

        It appears that the coin has a beaded border. In a coin struck out-
        of-collar (which will be true of any oversized planchet) these beads
        can stretch out to create what look like lines.

        Another possibility is collar clash. But this only applies if the 1
        peseta coin has a reeded edge. Also, collar clash usually does not
        affect all 360 degrees of a coin's circumference. So I'd go with the
        first scenario.

        > I have one collector of spanish errors and fakes who has a coin of
        1
        > peseta struck in a bigger planchet of 5 pesetas.
        > http://personales.ya.com/numisma/Error/00010.jpg
        >
        > I dont know why there are lines all over near the rim.
        >
        > Regards
        > Benjamin
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