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Nickel - Split Planchet

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  • Ben
    I won this auction: http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&item=1382870581&rd=1 I liked the coin but no idea what it is. Split means that the planchet
    Message 1 of 6 , Sep 27 11:46 PM
      I won this auction:
      http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&item=1382870581&rd=1
      I liked the coin but no idea what it is.
      Split means that the planchet looses metal??
      Why one face shows lamination an the other a weak strike???

      Regards
      Benjamin
    • Mike Diamond
      The planchet split in half prior to the strike. The obverse design was struck on the split face, which is why it shows rough striations. The reverse was
      Message 2 of 6 , Sep 28 5:11 AM
        The planchet split in half prior to the strike. The obverse design
        was struck on the split face, which is why it shows rough
        striations. The reverse was struck on the smooth outer face.

        The reason the design is weak is that the split planchet was thin.
        In the absence of a planchet the dies are set to approach each other
        without actually touching. The minimium set die distance is somewhat
        less than the thickness of a normal nickel planchet. If an
        abnormally thin planchet enters the striking chamber, we've got a
        disc of metal that is very close to the minimum die distance. As a
        result, the dies do not approach each other closely enough to
        generate a strong image.

        The strength of the image on a split planchet varies. It depends on
        the thickness of the split planchet and on the minimum die distance.

        --- In errorcoininformationexchange@y..., "Ben" <insano@a...> wrote:
        > I won this auction:
        > http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&item=1382870581&rd=1
        > I liked the coin but no idea what it is.
        > Split means that the planchet looses metal??
        > Why one face shows lamination an the other a weak strike???
        >
        > Regards
        > Benjamin
      • Mike Diamond
        A moderately thin planchet (split planchet or rolled-thin planchet) may show a well-struck design, if the minimum die distance is unusually small. However, a
        Message 3 of 6 , Sep 28 7:19 AM
          A moderately thin planchet (split planchet or rolled-thin planchet)
          may show a well-struck design, if the minimum die distance is
          unusually small.

          However, a VERY thin piece of metal, such as a loose clad layer or a
          large lamination peel will NEVER show a well-struck design, even if
          the minimum die distance is zero. Why is this so?

          There's a simple answer, so try your luck.
        • pwrwgndrvr
          Ha! This one is easy. A very thin planchet will never show a well struck design simply because there is not adequate metal available to flow into and fill the
          Message 4 of 6 , Sep 28 10:50 PM
            Ha! This one is easy.
            A very thin planchet will never show a well struck design simply
            because there is not adequate metal available to flow into and fill
            the design recesses in the dies, particularly in the areas where
            there is corresponding high relief on opposite faces of the coin.





            --- In errorcoininformationexchange@y..., "Mike Diamond" <mdia1@a...>
            wrote:
            > A moderately thin planchet (split planchet or rolled-thin planchet)
            > may show a well-struck design, if the minimum die distance is
            > unusually small.
            >
            > However, a VERY thin piece of metal, such as a loose clad layer or
            a
            > large lamination peel will NEVER show a well-struck design, even if
            > the minimum die distance is zero. Why is this so?
            >
            > There's a simple answer, so try your luck.
          • Mike Diamond
            Yup. Simple as that.
            Message 5 of 6 , Sep 29 5:34 AM
              Yup. Simple as that.

              --- In errorcoininformationexchange@y..., pwrwgndrvr <no_reply@y...>
              wrote:
              > Ha! This one is easy.
              > A very thin planchet will never show a well struck design simply
              > because there is not adequate metal available to flow into and fill
              > the design recesses in the dies, particularly in the areas where
              > there is corresponding high relief on opposite faces of the coin.
            • bman98231
              Just isn t enough metal on a Very Thin Planchet to fill the recessesm in the dies.. ... a
              Message 6 of 6 , Sep 29 11:34 AM
                Just isn't enough metal on a Very Thin Planchet to fill the recessesm
                in the dies..
                --- In errorcoininformationexchange@y..., "Mike Diamond" <mdia1@a...>
                wrote:
                > A moderately thin planchet (split planchet or rolled-thin planchet)
                > may show a well-struck design, if the minimum die distance is
                > unusually small.
                >
                > However, a VERY thin piece of metal, such as a loose clad layer or
                a
                > large lamination peel will NEVER show a well-struck design, even if
                > the minimum die distance is zero. Why is this so?
                >
                > There's a simple answer, so try your luck.
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