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Re: two colored extra thick dime

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  • pierregrobert
    Thank you for replying-how would some do this? ... They ... last ... photos ... rooms ... Just ... money
    Message 1 of 18 , Apr 30, 2002
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      Thank you for replying-how would some do this?

      --- In errorcoininformationexchange@y..., "dermestid" <mdia1@a...>
      wrote:
      > I can now say with complete confidence that this coin was altered
      > outside the mint. The edge has been compressed inward and the
      > obverse and reverse surfaces damaged.
      >
      > --- In errorcoininformationexchange@y..., "pierregrobert"
      > <pierregrobert@y...> wrote:
      > > Dermestid
      > >
      > > I uploaded four photos of the dime I was talking to you about.
      They
      > > are in the odd-ball folder in the photo section. They are the
      last
      > > four photos in that folder. The first two are a comparision
      photos
      > > front and back with a normal 1989 dime. The last two photos are a
      > > side and angle shot of the dime. Hope this helps you determine if
      > > this is damaged or altered. Have a great day!
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > > -- In errorcoininformationexchange@y..., "dermestid" <mdia1@a...>
      > > wrote:
      > > > Fred closely guards the identity of his sources, as any good
      > > > businessman would. Many of these coins come from counting
      rooms
      > > > (e.g., Brinks, Wells Fargo, etc.), while others might come from
      > > > Federal Reserve Banks and major commercial banks.
      > > >
      > > > If you'd like, you can send your dime to me for evaluation.
      Just
      > e-
      > > > mail me at mdia1@a... All you need to do is include enough
      money
      > > > for return postage.
    • dermestid
      I suspect that the dime was clamped between two metal cylinders or discs slightly smaller than the dime itself. That would account for the damage to the
      Message 2 of 18 , May 1, 2002
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        I suspect that the dime was clamped between two metal cylinders or
        discs slightly smaller than the dime itself. That would account for
        the damage to the obverse and reverse. Then the edge was either
        tapped with a hammer or rolled under pressure until the rims met the
        side of the cylinder/disc. I'm sure other scenarios can be imagined.
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