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Re: [Error Coin Information Exchange] Re: 1986-p/copper jefferson nickel

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  • Jonathan Langke
    It is bright and uncirculated. It has some tiny scratches on it.even in the tiny scrathes i do not see any silver showing through at all like in the washed
    Message 1 of 9 , Oct 3, 2006
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                                            It is bright and uncirculated. It has some tiny scratches on it.even in the tiny scrathes i do not see any silver showing through at all like in the washed coin that i  just saw in the photo section of this site.I originally took it out of a roll of new money.
      Is it bright and uncirculated, with the color of untarnished copper?
      Or is it dull, with a rough finish?

      --- In errorcoininformatio nexchange@ yahoogroups. com, Jonathan Langke
      <jlangke@... > wrote:
      >
      > I do not have anything to
      weigh it with. I will try to get someone that is more computer
      literate than myself to photogragh it. It appears to have the
      diameter of a regular nickel. It is very well struck. There
      appears to be a raised abrasion just to the right of thomas
      jeffersons head.
      >
      > Jonathan Langke <jlangke@... >
      wrote: I am a novice collector. I
      have a 1986-p copper jefferson nickel.I used to have a store and
      bought change from the bank on a weekly basis. The coin came in one
      of those clear plastic mint rolls from the bank. I noticed it and put
      it aside. This was at least 10 years ago. I was wondering if anyone
      knows what it might be worth. Thank you.
      >
      >
      > ------------ --------- --------- ---
      > How low will we go? Check out Yahoo! Messenger's low PC-to-Phone
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      Stay in the know. Pulse on the new Yahoo.com. Check it out.

    • Mike Diamond
      It could have been plated outside the Mint. Or it could be what is now being called in some circles an improper annealing error. Planchets end up with a
      Message 2 of 9 , Oct 3, 2006
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        It could have been plated outside the Mint. Or it could be what is
        now being called in some circles an "improper annealing" error.
        Planchets end up with a thin layer of copper on the surface.

        Those who employ this term see the cause as excessive heat and/or
        prolonged heating in the annealing drum. How this causes an extra
        layer of copper to be deposited on the planchet remains obscure.
        Perhaps copper atoms segregate out and migrate to the surface.
        Perhaps nickel atoms are liberated from the surface, leaving the
        copper fraction behind. Perhaps liberated copper atoms are re-
        deposited on the surface of the coin. These errors were previously
        called "copper wash" and "sintered plating" errors. "Copper wash"
        refers to a scenario in which copper ions suspended in a chemical
        rinse bath saturated with such ions adhere to the surface of the
        planchets. "Sintered plating" refers to the hypothesis that copper
        dust in the annealing drum adheres to copper-nickel or Cu-Ni clad
        planchets (perhaps due to electrostatic attraction) and the dust
        particles are baked and fused into continuous layer.

        Whatever the cause, end result is that copper-nickel and Cu-Ni clad
        planchets end up with a layer of copper at the surface.

        We would really need to see a photo, though.
      • Adam
        This is some great information. Thanks for sharing. Adam ... is ... previously ... copper ... clad
        Message 3 of 9 , Oct 30, 2006
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          This is some great information.
          Thanks for sharing.

          Adam


          --- In errorcoininformationexchange@yahoogroups.com, "Mike Diamond"
          <mdia1@...> wrote:
          >
          > It could have been plated outside the Mint. Or it could be what
          is
          > now being called in some circles an "improper annealing" error.
          > Planchets end up with a thin layer of copper on the surface.
          >
          > Those who employ this term see the cause as excessive heat and/or
          > prolonged heating in the annealing drum. How this causes an extra
          > layer of copper to be deposited on the planchet remains obscure.
          > Perhaps copper atoms segregate out and migrate to the surface.
          > Perhaps nickel atoms are liberated from the surface, leaving the
          > copper fraction behind. Perhaps liberated copper atoms are re-
          > deposited on the surface of the coin. These errors were
          previously
          > called "copper wash" and "sintered plating" errors. "Copper wash"
          > refers to a scenario in which copper ions suspended in a chemical
          > rinse bath saturated with such ions adhere to the surface of the
          > planchets. "Sintered plating" refers to the hypothesis that
          copper
          > dust in the annealing drum adheres to copper-nickel or Cu-Ni clad
          > planchets (perhaps due to electrostatic attraction) and the dust
          > particles are baked and fused into continuous layer.
          >
          > Whatever the cause, end result is that copper-nickel and Cu-Ni
          clad
          > planchets end up with a layer of copper at the surface.
          >
          > We would really need to see a photo, though.
          >
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