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a source of false reeding

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  • dermestid
    Recently Terry (pwrwgndrvr) sent me a Type I quarter blank with an 80% curved clip. Funny thing is, a few arc degrees along the outer edge seems to have faint
    Message 1 of 1195 , Mar 2, 2002
      Recently Terry (pwrwgndrvr) sent me a Type I
      quarter blank with an 80% curved clip. Funny thing is, a
      few arc degrees along the outer edge seems to have
      faint reeding.<br><br>I couldn't imagine how this has
      happened. In addition to being unable to figure out how a
      blank could have reeding, the shape of the reeding left
      me suspicious. Ordinarily, faint genuine reeding
      should show shallow, narrow grooves separated by
      relatively wide gaps. In this coin the faint reeding -- both
      the ridges and grooves -- were flat and the width of
      each ridge and groove was about the same.<br><br>At
      first I thought that this was false reeding created by
      the blank getting jammed in the fluted or rifled tube
      of a coin counting machine. However, I have examples
      of this kind of false reeding and it is not similar.
      False reeding from a counting machine is slanted and
      the spacing is wider. Also it tends to cover much
      more of the edge.<br><br>After further thought, I
      finally figured out the source of the false reeding on
      this clipped blank. These are reeding impressions
      picked up from another struck quarter. The spacing on
      the blank matches the spacing at the surface of fully
      struck reeding. Evidently this blank was compressed
      against and rolled against a struck quarter. This
      transferred the pattern of reeding to the edge of the blank.
      Perhaps there was a jam-up in the feeder
      tube.<br><br>This now explains some broadstruck quarters I have
      that also exhibit weak, flattish "reeding" with broad
      ridges and grooves.<br><br>This "pseudo-reeding" is thus
      related in a way to pseudobrockages. A pseudobrockage
      occurs when struck coins are mashed together in mint
      machinery. This is the edge-on equivalent to a
      pseudobrockage.
    • Mike Diamond
      It s not often that I address a post this old (8/24/2001). However, I did get to see once again the 1962 cent that I thought had four sets of raised, parallel
      Message 1195 of 1195 , Nov 10, 2003
        It's not often that I address a post this old (8/24/2001). However,
        I did get to see once again the 1962 cent that I thought had four
        sets of raised, parallel profiles of Lincoln. My initial impression
        based on a brief examination at a coin show was wrong. It actually
        had four sets of INCUSE images. It was a shifted cap strike. The
        coin had been struck through a die cap that had experienced three
        previous shift-and-strike events.

        So now I'm back to two sets of expansion ripples as the maximum I've
        yet come across. I still don't have an explanation that I'm
        comfortable with, though.

        --- In errorcoininformationexchange@yahoogroups.com, dermestid wrote:
        > You'll find in the "oddball errors" album an
        > image of 10c capped die strike with one set of
        > "expansion ripples" extending out from the head of
        > Roosevelt. Expansion ripples are a set of vague raised
        > outlines that parallel large central design elements such
        > as busts and buildings. I have one other example in
        > my collection -- a nickel.<br><br>I wrote a short
        > article on this phenomenon some time back in Errorscope.
        > In that article I presented I plausible theory to
        > explain this phenomenon. At least it was plausible at the
        > time. There's no need to go into the details, except to
        > say that this theory can, at best, explain the
        > existance of two sets of nested expansion
        > ripples.<br><br>However, at a coin show in Chicago about a year
        ago, I saw
        > a Lincoln cent from the early '60s that showed FOUR
        > sets of expansion ripples extending out from the front
        > of Lincoln's bust. They became progressively fainter
        > the farther out from the bust you went.
        > Unfortunately, the owner wouldn't sell it at even $125. Maybe I
        > should have offered more.<br><br>Has anyone out there
        > seen multiple expansion ripples like this?
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