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20270Re: Questions about 1865 Two Cents

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  • Mike Diamond
    Jul 12, 2008
      It's fairly common among recent coins, but I don't have enough
      experience with 19th century coins to comment on how common it might
      have been back then.

      --- In errorcoininformationexchange@yahoogroups.com, "Ralph"
      <rusty11482001@...> wrote:
      >
      > Thanks for getting back to me on this Mike. That explanation seems
      > more plausable than the one I got before. I would assume, given the
      > vast number of coins the mint produces, that this is not uncommon.
      >
      > Ralph
      >
      >
      > --- In errorcoininformationexchange@yahoogroups.com, "Mike Diamond"
      > <mdia1@> wrote:
      > >
      > > Unlikely, since the denticles and design rim remain strong. In a
      > true
      > > tilted die error (vertical misalignment), these design features
      > will be
      > > weak. The same would be true of a tapered planchet error. The
      > most
      > > likely reason for the weakness is that both dies had a coating of
      > > grease that partly filled the recesses of the die that correspond
      > to
      > > the poorly-struck design elements.
      > >
      > > --- In errorcoininformationexchange@yahoogroups.com, "Ralph"
      > > <rusty11482001@> wrote:
      > > >
      > > > I took the liberty of posting scans of an 1865 Two Cents piece
      in
      > the
      > > > default album (wasn't sure where else to put it). On the coin,
      > the
      > > > right side on both the obverse and reverse appears to be weak.
      It
      > has
      > > > been suggested that the dies weren't parallel when struck. Does
      > that
      > > > seem likely to you?
      > > >
      > > > Ralph Jones
      > > >
      > >
      >
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