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RE: [equineveterinarymedicine] Mare "Issues"

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  • Ryle Dittmar
    Have they determined what is causing the nymphomania? Cindy D. ... -- No virus found in this outgoing message. Checked by AVG Anti-Virus. Version: 7.0.300 /
    Message 1 of 55 , Jan 12, 2005
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      Have they determined what is causing the nymphomania?

      Cindy D.


      > A friend of mine's mare has been diagnosed with
      > nymphomania.
      >
      > Can you tell me what treatments are available for this
      > condition? Are there any methods, other than a hormone
      > therapy that will tone the condition down?
      >
      > Thanks
      > Beth

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    • M. Jung
      I do not find any of your thoughts corny, Tanya. Even as horse-lovers, I think we may tend to underestimate their emotions and intelligence. Example: When I
      Message 55 of 55 , Jan 28, 2005
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        I do not find any of your thoughts corny, Tanya. Even as horse-lovers,
        I think we may tend to underestimate their emotions and intelligence.

        Example:

        When I came in the back door to see Chancellor in ICU, he could not see
        me for he was 3 stalls away; yet he nickered. (as sick as he was and in
        such pain) The tech on duty, that evening, said she had just come
        through that door and Chancellor had not nickered. How did he know it
        was me? By the sound of my car!! (which I had parked right outside the
        door) I had thought only dogs and cats picked up on that.....and I have
        been around horses for 60 years.

        Yes, Tanya, I am an old timer. :-) You bet I take many walks down
        memory lane.

        I enjoyed your post. :-)

        Mari
        On Friday, January 28, 2005, at 11:44 AM, Tanya Geiger wrote:

        > Sara,
        > If at all possible I think you may want to go back and visit her.  I
        > have heard of animals that are ready to let go but hold on until they
        > are able to say goodbye in their own sort of way to those that they
        > love.   I know it may sound a bit corny and I am sure that some will
        > disagree. Some of the stories I have heard seemed a bit far fetched but
        > have heard of animals that should have died due to suffering a serious
        > trauma (like being hit by a car etc) that the owners truly believed
        > hung on until they got to their side so they could say good bye.  Have
        > also heard of a few stories that older animals seemed to hang on until
        > a particular person returned from having been gone and then let go
        > shortly after. ......... I know, I know, but it seems sometimes people
        > do it too?        (or maybe she is reliving her fondest memories which
        > may be better than eating........... maybe they are about eating in
        > that really great lush green pasture with her best friend)   I know, I
        > know..... but I like to think she is happy.    It sounds like she is
        > content..... and you know how old people sometimes get into traveling
        > down memory lane.
        > Tanya
        >
        > On Jan 26, 2005, at 6:15 AM, Sarah Pettengill wrote:
        > > Cindy,
        > > She eats but you have to take her over to her grain and then she will
        > > eat a little and then wander away. If you take her back over she will
        > > begin eating again. She eats al her grain and eats hay like she used
        > > to but it is almost like she forgets what she is supposed to be doing.
        > > No, she doesn't startle easy. Other than the fact that she acts like
        > > she is forgetting what she is supposed to be doing she is ok.
        > >  
        > > Sarah
        > >
        >
        >

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