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Uterine Torsion

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  • smith2267
    Clinical Signs and Treatment of Chronic Uterine Torsion in Two Mares J Am Vet Med Assoc 220[3]:349-353 Feb 1 02 Case Report 11 Refs Aimie J. Doyle, DVM; David
    Message 1 of 1 , Apr 1, 2002
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      Clinical Signs and Treatment of Chronic Uterine Torsion in Two Mares
      J Am Vet Med Assoc 220[3]:349-353 Feb 1'02 Case Report 11 Refs

      Aimie J. Doyle, DVM; David E. Freeman, MVB, PhD, DACVS; Debra S.
      Sauberli, DVM; Phillip D. Hammock, DVM, MS, DACVS; Theodore F. Lock,
      DVM, MS, DACT; Anna K. Rotting, Dr med vet
      Dept of Veterinary Clinical Medicine, CVM, University of Illinois,
      Urbana, IL 61802
      Two mares were evaluated because of chronic uterine torsions of 2 and
      4 weeks' duration; both were pyrectic, anemic, tachycardic, and
      anorectic, had signs of depression, and had an abnormal uterus and
      contents on transrectal examination. Both mares underwent cesarean
      section for lysis of adhesions from the uterus to the peritoneum,
      correction of the torsion, and ovariohysterectomy Both mares
      recovered with only minor complications and returned to be used as
      riding horses.
      Chronic uterine torsion should be considered in mares in late stages
      of gestation that have vague clinical signs and transrectal palpation
      findings that are unlike those described in typical cases of uterine
      torsion. Prognosis for life can be good after treatment by ventral
      midline celiotomy, cesarean section, correction of the torsion, and
      ovariohysterectomy. [Summary]
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