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Re: [equineveterinarymedicine] Re: Black Teeth

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  • Amy B
    I sure will. When we go to Texas A&M in a few days, we can ask them if they have any ideas. I have been around horses all my life and I have never seen this.
    Message 1 of 8 , Nov 6, 2012
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      I sure will. When we go to Texas A&M in a few days, we can ask them if
      they have any ideas. I have been around horses all my life and I have
      never seen this.

      Amy in TX


      On 11/6/12, Mac Barksdale <skyranger32792@...> wrote:
      > I hope you will keep us advised of the outcome of this "Black Teeth"
      > case..    I don't have any explanation to offer ? ? ? ?     Dr Mac
      >
      >
      > Dr Mac Barksdale
      > 10151 University Bvld Ste 118
      > Orlando, Florida 32817-1904  USSA
      > Cell 407 342 0938  mac.barksdale@...
      > www.antibioticfailure.com/drmac    www.drb.my4life.com
      >
      >
      >
    • Amy B
      It is like a coating of paint. We can not scrape it off. When we asked, one of the vets at Texas A&M said sometimes hay or pasture can make their teeth black,
      Message 2 of 8 , Nov 9, 2012
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        It is like a coating of paint. We can not scrape it off. When we
        asked, one of the vets at Texas A&M said sometimes hay or pasture can
        make their teeth black, but we really doubt this is the case. The
        horse is on the same hay he has always been on, from the same
        supplier, and he is not pastured. Eventually I guess we will take the
        horse back up to the university and the vets can see what we're
        talking about.

        The horse is also a little depressed and is losing weight even though
        he is eating... I think this is due to him being stuck in a stall
        because of the leg injury. He has started eating manure; when I first
        heard about his black teeth I thought that was probably why they were
        black -- but after I saw them I don't think so. I have had a lot of
        rescues eat manure in the early stages of their rehab, and their teeth
        never looked like this.

        Amy in TX
      • Amy B
        Oh I should add, this horse has never been starved. He was rescued due to injuries in his legs that went untreated. Amy in TX
        Message 3 of 8 , Nov 9, 2012
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          Oh I should add, this horse has never been starved. He was rescued due
          to injuries in his legs that went untreated.

          Amy in TX


          On 11/9/12, Amy B <neatolgart@...> wrote:
          > It is like a coating of paint. We can not scrape it off. When we
          > asked, one of the vets at Texas A&M said sometimes hay or pasture can
          > make their teeth black, but we really doubt this is the case. The
          > horse is on the same hay he has always been on, from the same
          > supplier, and he is not pastured. Eventually I guess we will take the
          > horse back up to the university and the vets can see what we're
          > talking about.
          >
          > The horse is also a little depressed and is losing weight even though
          > he is eating... I think this is due to him being stuck in a stall
          > because of the leg injury. He has started eating manure; when I first
          > heard about his black teeth I thought that was probably why they were
          > black -- but after I saw them I don't think so. I have had a lot of
          > rescues eat manure in the early stages of their rehab, and their teeth
          > never looked like this.
          >
          > Amy in TX
        • Missyclare
          Amy, I too would be interested in your answers. I have a horse, 14, who is on an analyzed and balanced diet, fully transitioned with rock crushing feet and his
          Message 4 of 8 , Nov 10, 2012
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            Amy, I too would be interested in your answers. I have a horse, 14, who is on an analyzed and balanced diet, fully transitioned with rock crushing feet and his teeth are doing the same thing. Its like a heavy, dark buildup of calculus coming down from the gum line. Mine threw out his sacra-illiac joint, was in pain, then needed the antibiotics etc. for 15 stitches above his eye. I noticed the teeth before the eye incident. The one thing we do have in common is two horses in pain, for what its worth.
            I wonder if changes in the make-up of the saliva could be doing this? Pain can be a wretched enemy indeed.

            --- In equineveterinarymedicine@yahoogroups.com, Amy B <neatolgart@...> wrote:
            >
            > One of the horses at our rescue was sedated recently for some surgical
            > work on a leg injury. He woke up blind, but since then his sight has
            > returned. The interesting thing is that now, he has black teeth. I
            > don't mean the normal brown, I mean they are black, as if someone took
            > black nail laquor and painted them. Any idea what caused this? He is a
            > paint stallion about six years old and he gets a diet of 10% horse
            > pellet, coastal, and alfalfa.
            >
            > Amy in TX
            >
          • Amy B
            Interesting!! I forgot to write down the medications our horse got. I will try to post them tomorrow. Our guy s black teeth are slowly going away, the black is
            Message 5 of 8 , Nov 16, 2012
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              Interesting!! I forgot to write down the medications our horse got. I
              will try to post them tomorrow. Our guy's black teeth are slowly going
              away, the black is receding again up to the gum line. The vets at A&M
              said pellets can do this, but I don't believe it, the horse was on
              pellets before and this never happened.

              Amy in TX


              On 11/11/12, Missyclare <mybackforty@...> wrote:
              > Amy, I too would be interested in your answers. I have a horse, 14, who is
              > on an analyzed and balanced diet, fully transitioned with rock crushing feet
              > and his teeth are doing the same thing. Its like a heavy, dark buildup of
              > calculus coming down from the gum line. Mine threw out his sacra-illiac
              > joint, was in pain, then needed the antibiotics etc. for 15 stitches above
              > his eye. I noticed the teeth before the eye incident. The one thing we do
              > have in common is two horses in pain, for what its worth.
              > I wonder if changes in the make-up of the saliva could be doing this? Pain
              > can be a wretched enemy indeed.
              >
              > --- In equineveterinarymedicine@yahoogroups.com, Amy B <neatolgart@...>
              > wrote:
              >>
              >> One of the horses at our rescue was sedated recently for some surgical
              >> work on a leg injury. He woke up blind, but since then his sight has
              >> returned. The interesting thing is that now, he has black teeth. I
              >> don't mean the normal brown, I mean they are black, as if someone took
              >> black nail laquor and painted them. Any idea what caused this? He is a
              >> paint stallion about six years old and he gets a diet of 10% horse
              >> pellet, coastal, and alfalfa.
              >>
              >> Amy in TX
              >>
              >
              >
              >
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