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Re: [equineveterinarymedicine] Re: EPM

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  • Rose Ofsandycreek
    Frankie, Thank you so much for the description of your horses symptoms. A very good educational tool I am thinking. I worry so much about my horses getting
    Message 1 of 9 , Jan 1, 2003
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      Frankie,

      Thank you so much for the description of your horses symptoms.  A very good educational tool I am thinking.  I worry so much about my horses getting this.  I lived for many years in Missouri and have now moved to Georgia. (lots of varmets)  We travel a lot and I let them drink on the trail.  I worry about this all the time.  I know what to watch for, somewhat.   The colt that I am most familiar with that had it, the owners didn't know anything about it and it was just a good guess on my part.  They called me wanting me to come look at him and help put him in the trailer.  He would fall down and then waller around some before he finally got help to get up.  this had been getting worse they said.  It was real obvious by the time I saw him.  I missed the earlie symptoms so thank you.  Good luck.  Please keep us posted with your recovery and the clicker training both. 



      Please view my site and let me know what you think.   http://www.geocities.com/listenstohorses2000

       



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    • KYSTOKES@aol.com
      My horse may have EPM.? Has anyone ever dealt with this before?? I have read up on it and know a lot about it know but was wondering if anyone has had a horse
      Message 2 of 9 , Oct 4, 2007
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        My horse may have EPM.  Has anyone ever dealt with this before?  I have read up on it and know a lot about it know but was wondering if anyone has had a horse who recovered from it?  I start treatment on him tonite.

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      • Jim Melton
        I had a horse recover from EPM about 1990. My vet at the time said it was the first one he was able to save. My gelding went on to earn QH points, and he is
        Message 3 of 9 , Oct 4, 2007
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          I had a horse recover from EPM about 1990.  My vet at the time said it was the first one he was able to save.  My gelding went on to earn QH points, and he is now living in my pasture at age 28.  Good luck with your horse.
                                                    Sharon Melton

          KYSTOKES@... wrote:
          My horse may have EPM.  Has anyone ever dealt with this before?  I have read up on it and know a lot about it know but was wondering if anyone has had a horse who recovered from it?  I start treatment on him tonite.

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        • Ryle Dittmar
          Hi, How was your horse diagnosed? What treatment are you starting on? What kind of symptoms have you seen? I know lots of people with horses who have
          Message 4 of 9 , Oct 4, 2007
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            Hi,
              How was your horse diagnosed?  What treatment are you starting on?  What kind of symptoms have you seen?
            I know lots of people with horses who have recovered from EPM.  It's often a very slow process and time off is a really big factor in getting a horse through EPM without ending up with secondary traumatic accidents due to the loss of coordination and balance. 
             
            Cindy D., RVT
            -----Original Message-----
            From: equineveterinarymedicine@yahoogroups.com [mailto:equineveterinarymedicine@yahoogroups.com]On Behalf Of KYSTOKES@...
            Sent: Thursday, October 04, 2007 12:27 PM
            To: equineveterinarymedicine@yahoogroups.com
            Subject: [equineveterinarymedicine] EPM

            My horse may have EPM.  Has anyone ever dealt with this before?  I have read up on it and know a lot about it know but was wondering if anyone has had a horse who recovered from it?  I start treatment on him tonite.


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          • Amy Combs
            My mare was diagnosed with EPM when she was 20. I should rephrase that.........she tested positive for exposure to EPM, which came through having blood work
            Message 5 of 9 , Oct 5, 2007
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              My mare was diagnosed with EPM when she was 20.  I should rephrase that.........she tested positive for exposure to EPM, which came through having blood work done.  From what I remember, we would have needed a spinal done on her to confirm the diagnoses.  I opted not to do that.  She started to get, shall we say wobbling.  Sometimes she had trouble while getting her feel trimmed, but my farrier was very patient and understanding.  My vet and I put her medication--pill form--and I honestly could not tell you what she was on,  it was so long ago.  Slight improvement to the point I could ride her with confidence that I wouldn't be putting myself or her in danger.  It never got worse and never completely went away, and she lived to 32 years old.
               
              Good Luck!!
               
              Amy
              from Wisconsin


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            • Dr Mac Barksdale
              Dr Mac Barksdale wrote:Equine Protozoal Myelitis EPM Intensive Therapy July 07 AAVP I have been prescribing Transfer Factor for
              Message 6 of 9 , Oct 13, 2007
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                Dr Mac Barksdale <skyranger32792@...> wrote:
                Equine Protozoal Myelitis

                EPM  Intensive Therapy  July 07  AAVP

                I have been prescribing Transfer Factor for EPM for six years now.   Some cases have recovered with TF when they did not with repeated courses of Marquis.

                EPM  Intensive Therapy  July 07  AAVP
                Here is the abstract for the Paper using Transfer Factor along with Ponazuril for a 65%  rate of recovery from Neurological EPM.   5 more head were mentioned that were still in rehab.  If those 5 recover completely then the percentage of recovery will be 87%  [20 of 23].  That is quite remarkable.

                Please note that all of these cases were neurological. The horses involved could no longer do their job.  The important thing is that those listed as recovered went back to work showing, racing, eventing or what ever they had done previous to the EPM.  As far as I can find, this it the only study of this type that has been done.

                No controls are mentioned in the abstract.  It is difficult to establish controls as every neurological case is different.  Inconsistent symptoms almost eliminate the comparison between controls and treated patients.

                In addition I do not believe the Microlactin is important or even useful in treating the EPM.  In my opinion it should not be used.    Mac

                An abstract of a paper presented at the American Association of Veterinary Parasitiologists annual meeting July 07.

                Quote:
                EPM:  Intensive Approach to Therapy
                 
                "An Intensive approach to therapy of clinical EPM.  Thomas R Bello, Tammy M. Allen.  Sandhills Equine Center , Southern Pines, NC.
                 
                Equine Protozoal Myeloencephalitis  [EPM] is a serious parasitic disease of horses producing neurological clinical signs.  Sarcocystis neurona is an incriminated pathogen.   If about 50% of US horses are seropositive but only 0.5 to 1% become clinically affected, there is an immunologic influence whether a horse is S. neurona-exposed or in the full EPM syndrome.  This report presents a treatment of 23 performance horses that were serum immunoblot positive for exposure to S. neurona.  This patient population was in full athletic competition, travel or training with associated stress.  We attempted to [1] improve the immunologic status of the horse, [2] protect it against the inflammatory reactions,  [3] and provide medication to kill the protozoa.  The cell-medicated immunity was stimulated by Transfer Factor in the feed for 37 days.  The inflammatory reactions of treatment crises from antiprotozoal activity were prevented by Microlactin [a neutrophil activation inhibitor] in feed for 28 days concurrently.  The antiprotozoal drug Ponazuril was given concurrently for 28 days.  Gait abnormalities, stumbling and behavior change were the most frequent and combined clinical signs [16.23 before treatment.  There were 65% [15/23] of horses that were healed and back at work.  Five horses [22%] are in progress of healing and physical rehabilitation.  Three extremely affected horses [13%] were not helped by the therapy."

                  [page 80  Abstract 70 of Proceedings of the AAVP  American Association of Veterinary Parasitologists,  Washinton DC ,  July 2007]

                Macnote:    If the additional 5 head mentioned do in fact become "recovered"  then the success rate will compute to 87%.

                If there are other questions write me privately.   Or see www.drb.my4life.com  
                EPM  Intensive Therapy  July 07  AAVP

                I have been prescribing Transfer Factor for EPM for six years now.   Some cases have recovered with TF when they did not with repeated courses of Marquis.

                I have been prescribing Transfer Factor for EPM for six years now.   Some cases have recovered with TF when they did not with repeated courses of Marquis.

                EPM  Intensive Therapy  July 07  AAVP
                Here is the abstract for the Paper using Transfer Factor along with Ponazuril for a 65%  rate of recovery from Neurological EPM.   5 more head were mentioned that were still in rehab.  If those 5 recover completely then the percentage of recovery will be 87%  [20 of 23].  That is quite remarkable.

                Please note that all of these cases were neurological. The horses involved could no longer do their job.  The important thing is that those listed as recovered went back to work showing, racing, eventing or what ever they had done previous to the EPM.  As far as I can find, this it the only study of this type that has been done.

                No controls are mentioned in the abstract.  It is difficult to establish controls as every neurological case is different.  Inconsistent symptoms almost eliminate the comparison between controls and treated patients.

                In addition I do not believe the Microlactin is important or even useful in treating the EPM.  In my opinion it should not be used.    Mac

                An abstract of a paper presented at the American Association of Veterinary Parasitiologists annual meeting July 07.

                Quote:
                EPM:  Intensive Approach to Therapy
                 
                "An Intensive approach to therapy of clinical EPM.  Thomas R Bello, Tammy M. Allen.  Sandhills Equine Center , Southern Pines, NC.
                 
                Equine Protozoal Myeloencephalitis  [EPM] is a serious parasitic disease of horses producing neurological clinical signs.  Sarcocystis neurona is an incriminated pathogen.   If about 50% of US horses are seropositive but only 0.5 to 1% become clinically affected, there is an immunologic influence whether a horse is S. neurona-exposed or in the full EPM syndrome.  This report presents a treatment of 23 performance horses that were serum immunoblot positive for exposure to S. neurona.  This patient population was in full athletic competition, travel or training with associated stress.  We attempted to [1] improve the immunologic status of the horse, [2] protect it against the inflammatory reactions,  [3] and provide medication to kill the protozoa.  The cell-medicated immunity was stimulated by Transfer Factor in the feed for 37 days.  The inflammatory reactions of treatment crises from antiprotozoal activity were prevented by Microlactin [a neutrophil activation inhibitor] in feed for 28 days concurrently.  The antiprotozoal drug Ponazuril was given concurrently for 28 days.  Gait abnormalities, stumbling and behavior change were the most frequent and combined clinical signs [16.23 before treatment.  There were 65% [15/23] of horses that were healed and back at work.  Five horses [22%] are in progress of healing and physical rehabilitation.  Three extremely affected horses [13%] were not helped by the therapy."

                  [page 80  Abstract 70 of Proceedings of the AAVP  American Association of Veterinary Parasitologists,  Washinton DC ,  July 2007]

                Macnote:    If the additional 5 head mentioned do in fact become "recovered"  then the success rate will compute to 87%.

                If there are other questions write me privately.   Or see www.drb.my4life.com  
                EPM  Intensive Therapy  July 07  AAVP

                I have been prescribing Transfer Factor for EPM for six years now.   Some cases have recovered with TF when they did not with repeated courses of Marquis.





                Dr Mac Barksdale
                4270 Aloma Ave, Suite 124-33A
                Winter Park, Florida, 32792
                Cell 407 342 0938     mac.barksdale@...
                www.antibioticfailure.com/drmac    
                  www.tlopinternational.com   
                Immunomodulators effective on: Fungal diseases, mycobacterial diseases, protozoal diseases, neuroviral immunological disorders, cancers, autoimmune diseases, nemathelminthes, Platyhelminthes, platyhelminthes flukes, viruses, asthma and bacterial infections.





                Dr Mac Barksdale
                4270 Aloma Ave, Suite 124-33A
                Winter Park, Florida, 32792
                Cell 407 342 0938     mac.barksdale@...
                www.antibioticfailure.com/drmac    
                  www.tlopinternational.com   
                Immunomodulators effective on: Fungal diseases, mycobacterial diseases, protozoal diseases, neuroviral immunological disorders, cancers, autoimmune diseases, nemathelminthes, Platyhelminthes, platyhelminthes flukes, viruses, asthma and bacterial infections.

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